Living With Ibs

20 Mar 19
PROJECT SRI LANKA

There are days when I find myself walking around the school and wondering why I have essentially just swapped one classroom for another. Last year my world had shrunk to the size of my English school’s campus, as it does for most people in that gruelling final year. I studied the IB, you see. And […]

20 Mar 19
TeachingCare.com Online Live Tuition

Chapter 1- The Living World   Post by TEACHINGCARE.COM – ONLINE TUITION. ONLINE LIVE HOME TUITION. ONLINE TUTORS, COACHING & TUTORIALS for English, Mathematics, Science, Physics, Chemistry Biology, Accountancy, Business Studies, Economics for CBSE, ICSE, IGCSE, IB, STATE BOARDS, NTSE, OLYMPIADS, JEE main, JEE advanced, NEET by QUALITY TEACHERS. TWO WAY INTERACTIVE CLASSES WITH ONLINE […]

19 Mar 19
News Archives Uk

A pregnant woman had her disabling symptoms wrongly diagnosed as postnatal depression – while she was actually living with ovarian cancer. Claire Thompson, 38, began struggling with extreme fatigue, bloating and low mood after giving birth to her daughter, Eirwen. Press Agency Claire Thompson was diagnosed with postnatal depression while she was actually living with […]

19 Mar 19
myshaolinkempo

Oftentimes the word “master” will incite a flare up quicker than someone with chronic IBS at a Indian restaurant. The internet is saturated with keyboard warriors who are quick to snap your literary neck and put you in your place if you even think of placing that word before your name. This is the day […]

19 Mar 19
TODAY NEWS

A MUM had her crippling symptoms misdiagnosed as postnatal depression –…

19 Mar 19
Best Online Shopping website

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19 Mar 19
The Irish Sun
HALF a million Brits are living with an undiagnosed bowel disease – that is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome, experts have warned. Coeliac disease is a serious autoimmune condition that can cause bloating, stomach cramps, diarrhoea or constipation and feeling exhausted. Towie star Megan McKenna has spoken out about her battle with coeliac disease But these symptoms are so similar to IBS that researchers found as many as one in four sufferers had been misdiagnosed, a recent survey found. In fact, ninety-seven per cent of people don’t realise their symptoms could be coeliac disease. Just some of the possible symptoms include: severe or occasional diarrhoea, excessive wind and/or constipation persistent or unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting recurrent stomach pain, cramping or bloating tiredness sudden or unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases) mouth ulcers Coeliac diesase is where the small intestine becomes inflamed and unable to absorb nutrients. It’s caused by the immune system mistaking substances found inside gluten as a threat to the body and attacking them. [quote credit=”Norma McGough” credit-meta=”Coeliac UK”]Thousands of people are not getting the necessary testing and are being left undiagnosed including those with IBS symptoms[/quote] There is no cure or medication and the only treatment is a strict gluten free diet for life. Reality star Megan McKenna and US actress Zoey Deschanel are among the celebrities who have coeliac disease. Megan previously opened up about battling the condition after being cruelly trolled about her sudden weight loss. She told Sun Online back in 2017: “I’m always going to have Coeliac disease, it’s a serious thing and it’s life changing. “It can lead to bowel cancer if you don’t control your diet, so this is a serious thing I have to live with and people need to stop trolling me.” Experts estimate that one in 100 people in the UK are coeliac, but only thirty per cent have been diagnosed. [quote credit=”Megan McKenna” credit-meta=”speaking about coeliac disease in 2017″]This is a serious thing I have to live with and people need to stop trolling me[/quote] The average time it takes for someone to get a diagnosis is 13 years from the onset of symptoms. If left untreated, coeliac disease can lead to a number of serious complications, including anaemia, osteoporosis, infertility and some neurological conditions. Anyone who has symptoms such as ongoing bloating, diarrhoea or constipation or IBS who haven’t been tested for coeliac disease are being urged to ask their GP for a blood test. Norma McGough, Coeliac UK director of policy, research and campaigns said: “The first step to diagnosing coeliac disease is a simple, inexpensive blood test done in primary care, but thousands of people are not getting the necessary testing and are being left undiagnosed including those with IBS symptoms. [boxout headline=”What is coeliac disease and how is it treated?”]Coeliac disease is an autoimmune digestive condition where the intestines react to gluten and become inflamed. The adverse reaction can come from the dietary protein which is often found in three cereals: wheat, barley and rye. The gluten damages the lining of the intestines making the body unable to absorb important nutrients. Coeliac disease is a life-long condition that can lead to bloating, nausea and tiredness, and is only treated by a change in diet. There are many symptoms for the disease including mouth ulcers, crippling fatigue, stomach pain, regular diarrhoea, weight loss and indigestion. It is fairly common and affects one in every 100 people in the UK including a number of celebrities, such as reality star Megan McKenna and actress Zoey Deschanel. Coeliac UK have come up with an online assessment to see if you are at risk of coeliac disease and whether you should consider getting tested for it. [/boxout] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN HEALTH” posts_category=”42″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] “This not only causes years of unnecessary suffering but also wasted costs to the NHS with repeated appointments and investigations. “We urge anyone who has symptoms such as ongoing bloating, diarrhoea or constipation and has been given a diagnosis of IBS but not been tested for coeliac disease to ask their GP to test them. “However, it is essential to keep eating gluten until all tests are completed as otherwise these tests may give a false negative result.” Actress Zoey Deschanel suffers with coeliac disease [bc_video video_id=”5570755484001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Telling your date about IBS is the least sexy bingo you’ll ever play”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
19 Mar 19
The Scottish Sun
HALF a million Brits are living with an undiagnosed bowel disease – that is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome, experts have warned. Coeliac disease is a serious autoimmune condition that can cause bloating, stomach cramps, diarrhoea or constipation and feeling exhausted. Towie star Megan McKenna has spoken out about her battle with coeliac disease But these symptoms are so similar to IBS that researchers found as many as one in four sufferers had been misdiagnosed, a recent survey found. In fact, ninety-seven per cent of people don’t realise their symptoms could be coeliac disease. Just some of the possible symptoms include: severe or occasional diarrhoea, excessive wind and/or constipation persistent or unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting recurrent stomach pain, cramping or bloating tiredness sudden or unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases) mouth ulcers Coeliac diesase is where the small intestine becomes inflamed and unable to absorb nutrients. It’s caused by the immune system mistaking substances found inside gluten as a threat to the body and attacking them. [quote credit=”Norma McGough” credit-meta=”Coeliac UK”]Thousands of people are not getting the necessary testing and are being left undiagnosed including those with IBS symptoms[/quote] There is no cure or medication and the only treatment is a strict gluten free diet for life. Reality star Megan McKenna and US actress Zoey Deschanel are among the celebrities who have coeliac disease. Megan previously opened up about battling the condition after being cruelly trolled about her sudden weight loss. She told Sun Online back in 2017: “I’m always going to have Coeliac disease, it’s a serious thing and it’s life changing. “It can lead to bowel cancer if you don’t control your diet, so this is a serious thing I have to live with and people need to stop trolling me.” Experts estimate that one in 100 people in the UK are coeliac, but only thirty per cent have been diagnosed. [quote credit=”Megan McKenna” credit-meta=”speaking about coeliac disease in 2017″]This is a serious thing I have to live with and people need to stop trolling me[/quote] The average time it takes for someone to get a diagnosis is 13 years from the onset of symptoms. If left untreated, coeliac disease can lead to a number of serious complications, including anaemia, osteoporosis, infertility and some neurological conditions. Anyone who has symptoms such as ongoing bloating, diarrhoea or constipation or IBS who haven’t been tested for coeliac disease are being urged to ask their GP for a blood test. Norma McGough, Coeliac UK director of policy, research and campaigns said: “The first step to diagnosing coeliac disease is a simple, inexpensive blood test done in primary care, but thousands of people are not getting the necessary testing and are being left undiagnosed including those with IBS symptoms. [boxout headline=”What is coeliac disease and how is it treated?”]Coeliac disease is an autoimmune digestive condition where the intestines react to gluten and become inflamed. The adverse reaction can come from the dietary protein which is often found in three cereals: wheat, barley and rye. The gluten damages the lining of the intestines making the body unable to absorb important nutrients. Coeliac disease is a life-long condition that can lead to bloating, nausea and tiredness, and is only treated by a change in diet. There are many symptoms for the disease including mouth ulcers, crippling fatigue, stomach pain, regular diarrhoea, weight loss and indigestion. It is fairly common and affects one in every 100 people in the UK including a number of celebrities, such as reality star Megan McKenna and actress Zoey Deschanel. Coeliac UK have come up with an online assessment to see if you are at risk of coeliac disease and whether you should consider getting tested for it. [/boxout] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN HEALTH” posts_category=”35″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] “This not only causes years of unnecessary suffering but also wasted costs to the NHS with repeated appointments and investigations. “We urge anyone who has symptoms such as ongoing bloating, diarrhoea or constipation and has been given a diagnosis of IBS but not been tested for coeliac disease to ask their GP to test them. “However, it is essential to keep eating gluten until all tests are completed as otherwise these tests may give a false negative result.” Actress Zoey Deschanel suffers with coeliac disease [bc_video video_id=”5570755484001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Telling your date about IBS is the least sexy bingo you’ll ever play”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
19 Mar 19
The Sun
HALF a million Brits are living with an undiagnosed bowel disease – that is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome, experts have warned. Coeliac disease is a serious autoimmune condition that can cause bloating, stomach cramps, diarrhoea or constipation and feeling exhausted. Towie star Megan McKenna has spoken out about her battle with coeliac disease But these symptoms are so similar to IBS that researchers found as many as one in four sufferers had been misdiagnosed, a recent survey found. In fact, ninety-seven per cent of people don’t realise their symptoms could be coeliac disease. Just some of the possible symptoms include: severe or occasional diarrhoea, excessive wind and/or constipation persistent or unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting recurrent stomach pain, cramping or bloating tiredness sudden or unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases) mouth ulcers Coeliac diesase is where the small intestine becomes inflamed and unable to absorb nutrients. It’s caused by the immune system mistaking substances found inside gluten as a threat to the body and attacking them. [quote credit=”Norma McGough” credit-meta=”Coeliac UK”]Thousands of people are not getting the necessary testing and are being left undiagnosed including those with IBS symptoms[/quote] There is no cure or medication and the only treatment is a strict gluten free diet for life. Reality star Megan McKenna and US actress Zoey Deschanel are among the celebrities who have coeliac disease. Megan previously opened up about battling the condition after being cruelly trolled about her sudden weight loss. She told Sun Online back in 2017: “I’m always going to have Coeliac disease, it’s a serious thing and it’s life changing. “It can lead to bowel cancer if you don’t control your diet, so this is a serious thing I have to live with and people need to stop trolling me.” Experts estimate that one in 100 people in the UK are coeliac, but only thirty per cent have been diagnosed. [quote credit=”Megan McKenna” credit-meta=”speaking about coeliac disease in 2017″]This is a serious thing I have to live with and people need to stop trolling me[/quote] The average time it takes for someone to get a diagnosis is 13 years from the onset of symptoms. If left untreated, coeliac disease can lead to a number of serious complications, including anaemia, osteoporosis, infertility and some neurological conditions. Anyone who has symptoms such as ongoing bloating, diarrhoea or constipation or IBS who haven’t been tested for coeliac disease are being urged to ask their GP for a blood test. Norma McGough, Coeliac UK director of policy, research and campaigns said: “The first step to diagnosing coeliac disease is a simple, inexpensive blood test done in primary care, but thousands of people are not getting the necessary testing and are being left undiagnosed including those with IBS symptoms. [boxout headline=”What is coeliac disease and how is it treated?”]Coeliac disease is an autoimmune digestive condition where the intestines react to gluten and become inflamed. The adverse reaction can come from the dietary protein which is often found in three cereals: wheat, barley and rye. The gluten damages the lining of the intestines making the body unable to absorb important nutrients. Coeliac disease is a life-long condition that can lead to bloating, nausea and tiredness, and is only treated by a change in diet. There are many symptoms for the disease including mouth ulcers, crippling fatigue, stomach pain, regular diarrhoea, weight loss and indigestion. It is fairly common and affects one in every 100 people in the UK including a number of celebrities, such as reality star Megan McKenna and actress Zoey Deschanel. Coeliac UK have come up with an online assessment to see if you are at risk of coeliac disease and whether you should consider getting tested for it. [/boxout] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN HEALTH” posts_category=”341″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] “This not only causes years of unnecessary suffering but also wasted costs to the NHS with repeated appointments and investigations. “We urge anyone who has symptoms such as ongoing bloating, diarrhoea or constipation and has been given a diagnosis of IBS but not been tested for coeliac disease to ask their GP to test them. “However, it is essential to keep eating gluten until all tests are completed as otherwise these tests may give a false negative result.” Actress Zoey Deschanel suffers with coeliac disease [bc_video video_id=”5570755484001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Telling your date about IBS is the least sexy bingo you’ll ever play”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
19 Mar 19
The Scottish Sun
FOR three years Claire Thompson was told she was suffering postnatal depression. The 38-year-old started struggling with extreme tiredness, bloating and low mood after giving birth to her daughter, Eirwen. Claire Thompson was diagnosed with postnatal depression when she was really living with ovarian cancer She eventually needed to have a full hysterectomy The mum-of-one, from Conway, Wales, claims that her concerns were dismissed – even after she started to suffer such horrific periods that she needed to take spare changes of clothes to work and wear layers and layers of incontinence pads. Docs said she simply had a case of postnatal depression. But years later, tests revealed she actually had ovarian cancer. “Something changed after the birth of my daughter,” she said. “At the time I was told it was postnatal depression and was just part of me getting used to being a new mum. She says that her debilitating symptoms were dismissed by docs It took over 20 trips to A&E before docs properly investigated “I felt really low and my stomach was extremely bloated and even when my periods stopped for a short while I was told I was probably just depressed.” Claire went to A&E over 20 times, fearing that she’d “bleed to death”, before finally being referred for further tests. By this point, the civil servant says that her swollen belly made her look seven months pregnant. “Looking back, I had all the symptoms of ovarian cancer but it was all just passed off as part of my new life as a mum. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of ovarian cancer”]Ovarian cancer affects about 7,000 women each year – making it one of the most common types of the disease in women. Terrifyingly, 20 per cent of women are diagnosed when they’re at stage 4, meaning that it’s too far gone to treat. Many symptoms of ovarian cancer are hard to recognise as they are similar to conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Others have mistakenly thought that the swelling is a result of pregnancy. Things to look out for include: A swollen stomach Feeling bloated constantly Needing to urinate frequently Discomfort in your tummy or pelvic area Feeling full quickly when eating [/boxout] “Gradually my periods became heavier and I was using two layered maxi size incontinence pads every hour. At one point I was visiting my A&E department every two to three weeks for around 18 months.” Medics eventually found a 10cm mass on her left ovary and fallopian tube but Claire claims they reassured her that it was likely to be a cyst. It was only after she pushed for more tests that she was later diagnosed with ovarian cancer and had a full hysterectomy in 2016. She said the diagnosis had made her want to “scream from the rooftop”. She’s now sharing her story to warn other women that they know their own bodies best “After the initial diagnosis, my whole world crashed around me, I didn’t know where to turn” “I wanted to scream from the rooftops, ‘I have been telling you this for years, why didn’t you listen?’ “The word cancer is such a huge thing. After the initial diagnosis, my whole world crashed around me, I didn’t know where to turn.” The brave mum is now celebrating being three years cancer-free by sharing her story in a bid to raise awareness of the often devastating disease. Claire had to have three tumours removed. She named her biggest Gerald. The hysterectomy forced Claire’s body into early menopause She’s now been cancer-free for three years “When I got told I was in remission, we threw a Christmas party to celebrate – in September!” she recalled. “I decorated the entire house and left it up for the rest of the year. I want my daughter to look back and remember that as the year her mum was crazy enough to celebrate Christmas for four months, rather than the year mummy was ill.” She said she wanted other women to know that they know their own bodies better than anyone else – even doctors. “If you know something is wrong, go back and question things. You know your body better than any doctor,” she stressed. She says that she’s not angry about her misdiagnosis but she hopes her story will help other women “I didn’t have postnatal depression, I had cancer. “I’m not angry about my misdiagnosis but I hope my story helps other women in the future.” Claire is being supported by Target Ovarian Cancer – a leading UK charity for the disease. Alexandra Holden, Director of Communications, Target Ovarian Cancer, said: “11 women die every day from ovarian cancer in the UK. There is no screening and one in five women is too ill to treat by the time they receive a diagnosis. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON OVARIAN CANCER” term_id=”6342″ posts_number=”12″ /] “Raising awareness of the disease and its symptoms is key, so this March, for Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Target Ovarian Cancer is calling for a government-funded symptoms awareness campaign. “Our research shows that one in five women mistakenly think a smear test can detect ovarian cancer. “In reality, with no screening programme, it is even more important that women know the symptoms.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours
19 Mar 19
The Sun
A MUM had her crippling symptoms misdiagnosed as postnatal depression – when she had really been living with ovarian cancer. Claire Thompson, 38, started struggling with extreme tiredness, bloating and low mood after giving birth to her daughter, Eirwen. Claire Thompson was diagnosed with postnatal depression when she was really living with ovarian cancer She eventually needed to have a full hysterectomy The mum-of-one, from Conway, Wales, claims that her concerns were dismissed – even after she started to suffer such horrific periods that she needed to take spare changes of clothes to work and wear layers and layers of incontinence pads. Docs said she simply had a case of postnatal depression. “Something changed after the birth of my daughter,” she said. “At the time I was told it was postnatal depression and was just part of me getting used to being a new mum. She says that her debilitating symptoms were dismissed by docs It took over 20 trips to A&E before docs properly investigated “I felt really low and my stomach was extremely bloated and even when my periods stopped for a short while I was told I was probably just depressed.” Claire went to A&E over 20 times, fearing that she’d “bleed to death”, before finally being referred for further tests. By this point, the civil servant says that her swollen belly made her look seven months pregnant. “Looking back, I had all the symptoms of ovarian cancer but it was all just passed off as part of my new life as a mum. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of ovarian cancer”]Ovarian cancer affects about 7,000 women each year – making it one of the most common types of the disease in women. Terrifyingly, 20 per cent of women are diagnosed when they’re at stage 4, meaning that it’s too far gone to treat. Many symptoms of ovarian cancer are hard to recognise as they are similar to conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Others have mistakenly thought that the swelling is a result of pregnancy. Things to look out for include: A swollen stomach Feeling bloated constantly Needing to urinate frequently Discomfort in your tummy or pelvic area Feeling full quickly when eating [/boxout] “Gradually my periods became heavier and I was using two layered maxi size incontinence pads every hour. At one point I was visiting my A&E department every two to three weeks for around 18 months.” Medics eventually found a 10cm mass on her left ovary and fallopian tube but Claire claims they reassured her that it was likely to be a cyst. It was only after she pushed for more tests that she was later diagnosed with ovarian cancer and had a full hysterectomy in 2016. She said the diagnosis had made her want to “scream from the rooftop”. She’s now sharing her story to warn other women that they know their own bodies best “After the initial diagnosis, my whole world crashed around me, I didn’t know where to turn” “I wanted to scream from the rooftops, ‘I have been telling you this for years, why didn’t you listen?’ “The word cancer is such a huge thing. After the initial diagnosis, my whole world crashed around me, I didn’t know where to turn.” The brave mum is now celebrating being three years cancer-free by sharing her story in a bid to raise awareness of the often devastating disease. Claire had to have three tumours removed. She named her biggest Gerald. The hysterectomy forced Claire’s body into early menopause She’s now been cancer-free for three years “When I got told I was in remission, we threw a Christmas party to celebrate – in September!” she recalled. “I decorated the entire house and left it up for the rest of the year. I want my daughter to look back and remember that as the year her mum was crazy enough to celebrate Christmas for four months, rather than the year mummy was ill.” She said she wanted other women to know that they know their own bodies better than anyone else – even doctors. “If you know something is wrong, go back and question things. You know your body better than any doctor,” she stressed. She says that she’s not angry about her misdiagnosis but she hopes her story will help other women “I didn’t have postnatal depression, I had cancer. “I’m not angry about my misdiagnosis but I hope my story helps other women in the future.” Claire is being supported by Target Ovarian Cancer – a leading UK charity for the disease. Alexandra Holden, Director of Communications, Target Ovarian Cancer, said: “11 women die every day from ovarian cancer in the UK. There is no screening and one in five women is too ill to treat by the time they receive a diagnosis. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON OVARIAN CANCER” term_id=”6342″ posts_number=”12″ /] “Raising awareness of the disease and its symptoms is key, so this March, for Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Target Ovarian Cancer is calling for a government-funded symptoms awareness campaign. “Our research shows that one in five women mistakenly think a smear test can detect ovarian cancer. “In reality, with no screening programme, it is even more important that women know the symptoms.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours
19 Mar 19
The Irish Sun
FOR three years Claire Thompson was told she was suffering postnatal depression. The 38-year-old started struggling with extreme tiredness, bloating and low mood after giving birth to her daughter, Eirwen. Claire Thompson was diagnosed with postnatal depression when she was really living with ovarian cancer She eventually needed to have a full hysterectomy The mum-of-one, from Conway, Wales, claims that her concerns were dismissed – even after she started to suffer such horrific periods that she needed to take spare changes of clothes to work and wear layers and layers of incontinence pads. Docs said she simply had a case of postnatal depression. But years later, tests revealed she actually had ovarian cancer. “Something changed after the birth of my daughter,” she said. “At the time I was told it was postnatal depression and was just part of me getting used to being a new mum. She says that her debilitating symptoms were dismissed by docs It took over 20 trips to A&E before docs properly investigated “I felt really low and my stomach was extremely bloated and even when my periods stopped for a short while I was told I was probably just depressed.” Claire went to A&E over 20 times, fearing that she’d “bleed to death”, before finally being referred for further tests. By this point, the civil servant says that her swollen belly made her look seven months pregnant. “Looking back, I had all the symptoms of ovarian cancer but it was all just passed off as part of my new life as a mum. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of ovarian cancer”]Ovarian cancer affects about 7,000 women each year – making it one of the most common types of the disease in women. Terrifyingly, 20 per cent of women are diagnosed when they’re at stage 4, meaning that it’s too far gone to treat. Many symptoms of ovarian cancer are hard to recognise as they are similar to conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Others have mistakenly thought that the swelling is a result of pregnancy. Things to look out for include: A swollen stomach Feeling bloated constantly Needing to urinate frequently Discomfort in your tummy or pelvic area Feeling full quickly when eating [/boxout] “Gradually my periods became heavier and I was using two layered maxi size incontinence pads every hour. At one point I was visiting my A&E department every two to three weeks for around 18 months.” Medics eventually found a 10cm mass on her left ovary and fallopian tube but Claire claims they reassured her that it was likely to be a cyst. It was only after she pushed for more tests that she was later diagnosed with ovarian cancer and had a full hysterectomy in 2016. She said the diagnosis had made her want to “scream from the rooftop”. She’s now sharing her story to warn other women that they know their own bodies best “After the initial diagnosis, my whole world crashed around me, I didn’t know where to turn” “I wanted to scream from the rooftops, ‘I have been telling you this for years, why didn’t you listen?’ “The word cancer is such a huge thing. After the initial diagnosis, my whole world crashed around me, I didn’t know where to turn.” The brave mum is now celebrating being three years cancer-free by sharing her story in a bid to raise awareness of the often devastating disease. Claire had to have three tumours removed. She named her biggest Gerald. The hysterectomy forced Claire’s body into early menopause She’s now been cancer-free for three years “When I got told I was in remission, we threw a Christmas party to celebrate – in September!” she recalled. “I decorated the entire house and left it up for the rest of the year. I want my daughter to look back and remember that as the year her mum was crazy enough to celebrate Christmas for four months, rather than the year mummy was ill.” She said she wanted other women to know that they know their own bodies better than anyone else – even doctors. “If you know something is wrong, go back and question things. You know your body better than any doctor,” she stressed. She says that she’s not angry about her misdiagnosis but she hopes her story will help other women “I didn’t have postnatal depression, I had cancer. “I’m not angry about my misdiagnosis but I hope my story helps other women in the future.” Claire is being supported by Target Ovarian Cancer – a leading UK charity for the disease. Alexandra Holden, Director of Communications, Target Ovarian Cancer, said: “11 women die every day from ovarian cancer in the UK. There is no screening and one in five women is too ill to treat by the time they receive a diagnosis. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON OVARIAN CANCER” term_id=”6342″ posts_number=”12″ /] “Raising awareness of the disease and its symptoms is key, so this March, for Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Target Ovarian Cancer is calling for a government-funded symptoms awareness campaign. “Our research shows that one in five women mistakenly think a smear test can detect ovarian cancer. “In reality, with no screening programme, it is even more important that women know the symptoms.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours
19 Mar 19
Mama Jenn Living

You would not have seen me today, nor hear from me. It was not a surgery, disease or violence that could’ve taken my life. It would have been a silent killer. The ‘one’ that runs in your mind. The ‘one’ that grips your heart and tells you to take your own life. I read an […]