Lupine

26 Apr 19
Critical Reading by Rani Nur Aisyah

Chapter 21  : The unknowable room There are a lot of things to be discussed lately in the Gryffindor shared room with a sighting test that looks big, with Ron and Lavender on the rocks, and with the memory of the Horcrux that hasn’t been collected. Kreacher and Dobby reported that Malfoy had used the Room […]

26 Apr 19
Critical Reading by Rani Nur Aisyah

Chapter 14  : Felix felicis In the Herbology class the next morning, Harry, Ron, and Hermione talked too much to be able to focus on making Snargaluff fruit juices. Harry tries to pretend to be busy hunting pods while Hermione and Ron fight about Slughorn’s holiday party. Ron thought Slughorn was ridiculous, especially since he had […]

26 Apr 19
chainstitchx

Just downstream from the Alabama Highway 35 bridge, follow the boardwalk to the bottom of Little River Falls for an easy-access dunk when water levels are low. Cannonball! In summertime, when the mercury taunts the tip of the thermometer like an angry red fist, the best place to cool down is an old-fashioned swimming hole. […]

25 Apr 19
Martin's Home Improvement World

Growing your own natural garden can also supplying yourself with a relaxing, stress-relieving pastime. If this sounds terrific, however you aren't sure where to start, do not worry. Read on to find out how to make your own house garden! Do not eliminate weeds by pulling them. This takes you a lot of time and […]

25 Apr 19
Critical Reading (Risky Anggreani)

Chapter 26 The Cave The Horcrux found by Dumbledore was located in the same cave where Tom Riddle terrorized two orphans. Voldemortwas sentimental like that. Down the steep cliffs, amid the crashing waves, Dumbledore and Harry entered the cave. Dumbledore uses magic to help him find his way to the Horcrux.They arrived in a small […]

25 Apr 19
Kelley's World of DIY

Growing your own natural garden can also offering yourself with a relaxing, stress-relieving pastime. If this sounds terrific, but you aren't sure where to start, do not stress. Continue reading to find out how to make your own house garden! Do not eliminate weeds by pulling them. This takes you a great deal of time […]

25 Apr 19
Critical Reading (Risky Anggreani)

Chapter 16 A very frosty christmas Ron and Harry go to Burrow for vacation. Harry’s thoughts raced about Malfoy and Snape, and he could not help telling everyone what he had learned and about his suspicions. Mr.Weasley told Harry that Snape might just pretend to be on Voldemort’s side so he could find out more […]

25 Apr 19
Kelley's World of DIY

Growing your own organic garden can also offering yourself with a relaxing, stress-relieving hobby. If this sounds fantastic, but you aren't sure where to begin, don't fret. Continue reading to browse around these guys learn how to make your own house garden! Do not eliminate weeds by pulling them. This takes you a lot of […]

25 Apr 19
Lep Log

HIGHLIGHTS:  Frosted Elfin, Cobweb Skipper, Harvester After a spate of new sightings last week, the pace of additional emergents has slowed down a bit this week. Arguably the best sighting of the week was a Harvester reported from the Washington Co./Frederick Co. line. Cobweb Skipper was a new skipper taxon for the season, reported from […]

25 Apr 19
IndieWire
It’s a hard truth, but in the days of binge culture, a lengthy opening credits sequence can feel like a burden for the viewer — if the point is to jump as quickly as possible to the next installment of a story, then two minutes of title cards and abstract imagery will more often than not have people reaching for the fast-forward button. That might be why Netflix created the “Skip Intro” feature for its users — but it’s also why many of the shows on the list below have proven innovative in how they approach their opening sequences. By changing key elements of the opening credits each week, series are able to make watching them essential, while also adding additional insight into the show for attentive viewers. The below list is ranked based on both ingenuity as well as how much the changes enhance the viewing experience. The best shows, after all, make use of every moment to tell their stories. 18. “The X-Files” It’s not the big changes that make us always pay attention to the opening credits of “The X-Files” — it’s the little ones: Specifically the tagline, traditionally “The Truth is Out There,” but for special episodes or the occasional fun gag swapped for some other mysterious catchphrase. Classic examples include “The Erlenmeyer Flask”: “Trust No One,” baseball-themed “The Unnatural”: “In the Big Inning,” and “Trust No 1”: “They’re Watching.” The changes, especially in the early days, felt like secret messages from the show’s creator, which only amplified the show’s innate feeling of conspiracy. 17. “Supernatural” Over the past 14 seasons, “Supernatural” (originating on the WB, now airing on the CW) keeps things relatively simple with its opening credits — really, just a title card. But not only does the visual motif change every season to fit specific themes, special episodes switch things up, especially when the episode in question is riffing on a genre or pop culture staple, from westerns to classic sitcoms to “The X-Files” to “Scooby Doo.” The modified title card approach, by the way, is one emulated by many of the Greg Berlanti-produced DC shows for the CW, with a special shout-out to our bonkers favorite “Legends of Tomorrow“, which has had more opportunity than most to have fun here, at the most random of times. 16. “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” Blink and you might miss why the HBO weekly talk show has made this list, but every episode packs a number of fresh Easter eggs into the opening credits, using fractured Latin to redefine the most chaotic elements of our world. The biggest one, which always appears moments before John Oliver’s signature “WELCOME WELCOME WELCOME!” tends to reflect the most major cultural or political moment of the week: As of writing, the latest episode chose to spotlight Paas egg-dying kits, AKA “Paas Americana” — all too appropriate on a meta level, given it aired on Easter. 15. “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” Between seasons, it’s not uncommon for a show to make some changes to the opening credits. But “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” took it to a whole other extreme by creating a brand new opening title number each year — one deliberately designed to reflect the changes in Rebecca’s (Rachel Bloom) life, and the show’s investment in her personal growth. Fierce debates have waged over which of the four sequences is the best (personally, “I’m Just a Girl In Love” is the most addictive earworm) but all of them represented the show’s unique point-of-view and lack of fear when it came to expressing our worst emotions… in a song. 14. “Jane the Virgin” “Jane the Virgin.” So the titular Jane (Gina Rodriguez) hasn’t officially been a virgin since the beginning of Season 3, but the writers of the CW dramedy found an ingenious way to reflect that while also holding onto their title: Each episode still opens with the title card “Jane the Virgin,” but then “Virgin” is crossed out with whatever phrase might best represent Jane that week: Happy Mom, Roommate, Flirt… It’s a simple solution, but one adds to the show’s best qualities: its meta-comedy, as well as the way in which at the core of the story is Jane’s personal journey to be defined by more than just one word. 13. “Outlander” Over the course of four seasons, the Starz historical time travel drama has spanned space and time, over the course of centuries and continents. And whenever the setting alters, so do the credits, especially in the music. The lyrics of composer Bear McCreary’s theme song change to French a brief time in Paris, while their American adventures are introduced each episode by a banjo-infused variation on the music. And coupled with the shifting visuals, each subtle shift proves to be a reminder that while things might change on the show, some things — like Jamie and Claire’s enduring love — never change. 12. “Silicon Valley” The opening credits of “Silicon Valley” reflect a pixelated community caught up in technology, with plenty of tiny easter eggs packed into the corners of the frame to delight the nerdiest members of the audience. The blend of references to the show’s fictional entities, existing companies, and local industry issues is always changing based on the progress of the show and the progress of the industry it satirizes, and it adds wry dimension to the show’s ever-shifting developments. 11. “Review” “Review.” Over his short tenure as the world’s greatest critic of life on Comedy Central, Forrest MacNeil (Andy Daly) reviewed so many things. But not all of them are fully featured in the show — instead there are many that are just featured in brief moments during the short opening credits, which Daly told Vice was often an opportunity for the writing staff’s most random ideas to get a moment to shine. “Just when did these reviews happen, anyway? How come we don’t get to see them in full? Whatever logical problems are made up for by the fact that it’s fun to see these quick hits.” Daly is a comedic genius, and he happens to be quite right about that. 10. “Archer” As “Archer” continues to reinvent its format every season, so goes its opening credits, mimicking the genre at the center of each new season. From noir to ’80s action to jungle adventure, the credits manage to be unique to “Archer” as a show, thanks to their Saul Bass-inspired silhouettes, while continuing to show that it’s not necessarily the same show you might remember from seasons past. We’re just on the verge of the new season, a sci-fi tribute designated as “Archer: 1999,” and whatever the show’s creators have planned should be dazzling. 9. “Community” “Community’s” opening credits went through a lot of changes over the course of its six seasons due to cast changes, but while the origami paper fortune teller was a relative constant, for special episodes the show would riff both on that as well as the show’s opening theme song, “At Least It Was Here” by the 88. This included a Claymation version for “Abed’s Uncontrollable Christmas,” a Dungeons and Dragons homage, a Saul Bass-styled Western tribute, and an 8-bit animated opening screen. Its high point, however, was the well-studied tribute to “Law and Order” that led off the Season 3 episode “Basic Lupine Urology.” The final shot of them walking down the hallway made it a classic. 8. “Broad City” In 2015, illustrator Mike Perry told Art of the Title that his concept for the short animated sequences that kick off every episode of the Comedy Central favorite was “big, bold, and weird… and wiggly.” And that’s just what he delivered, with bright fresh colors, for each new opening sequence. While the actual animation might change with each episode, Perry’s unique style makes them all feel of a piece, representing the fun chaotic energy of the show in just seven seconds. 7. “The Dick Van Dyke Show” The iconic opening was much like the rest of this 1960s series, as it was often ahead of its time. The earliest entry on this list only changed its credits a few times, but the ways in which Rob Petrie would arrive home to face his greatest nemesis — the living room ottoman — offered up solid pratfalls that still deliver slapstick charm today. 6. “Bob’s Burgers” Every episode of Fox’s long-running animated sitcom finds a way to pack in as many puns as possible, and one reliable source for these comedy nuggets is the “store next door,” which appears to be a terrible place for a retail establishment because the business keeps changing with every episode. The list of store names is epic in length and full of delights, but here are just a few favorites: “Grindecologist Coffee Shop,” “Yadda Yadda Dada Jewish Surrealist Art Gallery,” “That’s What She Sawed: Tools For Women,” and “I Think Therefore I Jam Profound Preserves.” 5. “The Leftovers” The Season 1 opening credits of the HBO drama served as a prelude to the show’s moodiest moments, with its orchestral score and gothic undertones. Season 2 switched things up with a brighter palate and heartfelt new theme song, “Let the Mystery Be” by Iris Dement. Season 3? This already crazy show took it up to the next level. Every episode featured some twist on the opening credits, from forgoing it entirely with the first episode to smashing the Season 2 visuals with an eclectic yet perfectly matched mix of songs, from Wu-Tang Clan to traditional Jewish music to A-ha. Each change represented yet another bold choice by Damon Lindelof and Tom Perotta, in a season rich with nuanced insanity. 4. “Fringe” “Fringe’s” opening sequence was on the surface relatively simple if packed with mysterious and bizarre symbols and phrases, including (in Season 1) “psychokinesis,” “dark matter,” and “transmogrification.” However, as the show evolved beyond its initial roots as a paranormal procedural and into the bonkers sci-fi drama it would eventually become, its opening credits became a symbol of this. First, in Season 2, Episode 16, “Peter,” the show’s flashback storyline was tipped off by a 80s-themed version of the original. Then, in the Season 2 finale, the color scheme shifted from blue to red to represent the characters’ travel to an alternate universe, and it just kept getting crazier from there, as the universes multiplied and the present gave way to a dystopian future — one that never explained just what the deal was with that six-fingered hand. 3. “Game of Thrones” Even before it got a complete refresh for Season 8, this credits sequence proved memorable and eye-catching from the beginning. The visually intricate way in which the camera zooms through this miniature map of George R.R. Martin’s perilous fantasy world, and the way in which the map changes from episode to episode to reveal new kingdoms or the damage done to beloved homes, is perfectly paired with the ever-sweeping frame to establish the HBO drama as a true epic. 2. “The Simpsons” For 30 seasons, “The Simpsons” has been the great-grandaddy of this tradition, packing its opening credits with regular switcharoos, including Bart writing lines at the blackboard, Lisa crooning on her sax, and then of course the infamous couch gag which often showcases the series at its most cartoonish. But while those weekly shifts would be enough to make sure this show made this list, it’s really the guest-directed opening credits which continue to dazzle us, with sequences helmed by artists like Banksy, Bill Plympton, Guillermo del Toro, and Don Hertzfeldt. “The Simpsons” is a show that’s easy to take for granted, but those who work on it seem continually interested in innovating. 1. “BoJack Horseman” Of all the shows one should never “Skip Intro” on, “BoJack Horseman” stands out as one of the most important. Each credits sequence eases you back into the hazy mindset of the titular horseman, but while he keeps wandering through life, the details of his world are constantly changing around him. The biggest elements tend to remain somewhat constant over the course of the season, such as locations like film sets or movie premieres, but the emotional impact of watching people appear in BoJack’s life — and then, an episode or more later, vanish — captures the character’s waxing and waning loneliness and isolation like a gutpunch.
25 Apr 19
Krystal

Thanks to Southern California’s wet winter, the Santa Monica Mountains are alive with luminous purple phacelia and bright blue lupine flowers. But amid the joyful eruption of native wildflowers, an aggressive interloper has also returned. The yellow bloom of the invasive plant Brassica nigra, better… from latimes.com – Los Angeles Times http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-mustard-fire-santa-monica-mountains-20190425-story.html

25 Apr 19
Welcome

A walk in the Idaho Botanical Garden The Idaho Botanical Garden is the perfect place to see plants and wildflowers in the spring, and it’s right in Boise’s backyard. By × The Idaho Botanical Garden is the perfect place to see plants and wildflowers in the spring, and it’s right in Boise’s backyard. By Thanks […]

25 Apr 19
Lyndon and Gardening

I wish it would rain. It has been very windy and very dry here for the last couple of weeks. Of course, last year in April all it did was SNOW and I was close to despair by the time that Spring finally came sauntering in the second week of May. There are many things […]

25 Apr 19
Monterey Herald
Nothing says road trip like California in the spring. Except this year the abundance of rain and snow made it difficult to choose between a sundrenched play date in the Sierra Nevada’s epically beautiful white wonderland or feasting on the valleys’ and headlands’ fantastic and fleeting wildflower show. If California was showing off the best of two worlds in one season this year, I greedily wanted to indulge in the silence and solitude of the snow-covered mountain realm and feast on the rare tsunami of color sweeping the landscape below. The answer was for my husband David, our dog Gem and me to set off on a scenic loop journey across the Central Valley over the northern Sierra Mountains to Mammoth Lakes and across the southern Sierra Range to the coast. The brimming San Luis Reservoir and its skirt of green on Pacheco Pass confirmed last winter’s bounty as we hooked toward HIghway 5 north across the Central Valley to Highway 88. The eastward route quickly morphed from verdant knolls to snow-smothered lakes and a panorama of frosted crowns as we crested on Carson Pass. Joshua Tree bloom against a backdrop of goldfields along Highway178 in the southern Sierra. (David Mullally – Special to the Herald) The road continued to twist down to the high desert floor, where cattle and sheep munched on an early crop of green along the snow-fed streams in the shadow of snow-capped ridges and pinnacles. We weaved in and out of spring and winter along Highway 395’s vast expanse of sage-covered plains. The Walker River rippled and rushed over boulders tracing the base of the winding canyon as we continued to thread toward Mammoth Lakes. The bleaker dormant desert mesa gradually gave way to undulating hills dotted with deep green pine trees bursting with new growth. Clouds of snowflakes on the crags overlooking Mono Lake cast a moody shade of jade over the ancient lake at the northern edge of the geologically famous Long Valley Caldera and the charming enclave of Lee Vining. My pulse quickened with anticipation as we approached Mammoth Lakes and started the climb into the Lakes Basin’s magnificence with the Sherwin Range, Mammoth Crest and Mammoth Mountain framing the surreal postcard scenery. We checked into our favorite dog-friendly studio cabin at Tamarack Lodge on the shores of the frozen Twin Lakes just before sunset. The queen bed, hardwood floors, kitchenette, tiled shower and corner gas fireplace provided the necessary creature comforts for convenience and cocooning. We spent the next two euphoric days floating through the forest on snowshoes atop 10 feet of pristine white snow. The granite cirques and ramparts created a sort of magical citadel isolating us from real world intrusions in this enchanting domain. I devoured the thin pure air, dazzling sunshine and stunning setting. On the last day, we huffed up to 9,000 feet delighted by how the azure blue skies made light dance on McLeod Lake’s virgin snow and the iced crystal cliffs. The southern Sierra dressed in swirls of purple and yellow along Highway 178. (David Mullally – Special to the Herald) The next morning we headed home down along the Owens Valley corridor buttressed by the snow-cloaked Sierra Nevada and White Mountains.  We stopped at Schatz Bakery in Bishop to stock up on their famous hearty turkey and squaw bread sandwich sensing adventure and an ambitious itinerary ahead. Soon after Lone Pine and majestic Mount Whitney, the Sierra’s white crest faded into rocky spines and undulating ridges. The typically arid slopes boasted chutes of mustard yellow buds, while the usually dusty sage was blasted in vibrant green. We veered west on HIghway 14 and up the less traveled Highway 178 over Walker Pass toward Lake Isabella and the Kern River Canyon. This remote 80-mile traverse over the southern Sierra is an amazing transition zone between the Mojave Desert and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We were thrilled to see that the plateau was thriving with a pageant of Joshua Trees adorned in white blooms. The road unfurled through valleys fringed with cottonwood groves, where swales were brushed with swirls of purple, mauve and yellow making the occasional outpost look idyllic rather than forgotten. Mother Nature had cranked the spring color wheel to the max. We dropped out of the mountains tracing the Kern River Canyon’s dramatic tumble around boulders accented by bouquets of blue lupine. The Central Valley’s citrus scent permeated the air as we drove north along Highway 99 and west on Highway 46 to Paso Robles. Heading north on Highway 101 would have been the quicker route home, but we were on a bloom high, so we pushed west on back roads through vineyard hamlets laced with hillside honeysuckle, lilac lupine and blue vetch, riding the swell of grassy oak-studded hills to Cambria and Highway 1. The Big Sur coastal plain explodes with California poppies. (David Mullally – Special to the Herald) We had been fortunate to experience the dazzling white of an epic snow year and a kaleidoscope of blooms in one trip, but my wish list was missing the so far elusive California poppy. The Pacific Ocean gleamed against the lush coastal plains beckoning us to stop for a stroll, but sunset was at our heels and Carmel was still more than two hours up the coast.  As the Sand Dollar Beach day use area came into view just north of Gorda, we decided that Gem deserved a stretch-and-sniff stop on one of our favorite coastal trails. We had barely walked a few yards, before I stumbled on a patch of gold petals fluttering in the cloud-chilled early evening breeze. One lucky sunbeam and the meadow brightened into a sea of poppies. We drove home satiated with beauty and filled with gratitude for the privilege of witnessing a sublime California spring from snow to sea. Linda B. Mullally and husband David share their passion for travel, outdoor recreation and dogs through articles, hiking books and photography at http://www.lindabmullally.com, Falcon.com and Facebook        
24 Apr 19
Michelle Peele

The Maine Homes Magazine article featuring our house in Alna was published earlier this spring, but it was just added online this week. We were so pleased with how this shoot came together and are so thankful that our two dogs, Abby and Mason, who both died late last year, were included in the final […]

24 Apr 19
John Carr Outdoors

Welcome to John Carr Outdoors!  Please visit the blog and follow. The follow button can be found at the bottom of the page.  If you are seeing this on Facebook, click the link to visit the blog to see all of the photos. Lyle Cherry Orchard The promise of warm sunshine on the south-facing slopes […]

24 Apr 19
Million In$ights

Global Dog Collar Market is estimated to grow considerably in the forecast period owing to the increasing awareness among owners for betterment of dogs. A dog collar is specially meant for dog/s worn around the neck. Dog collar helps in manual controlling of dogs since it offers ease of use and safety. Collars are also […]