Manoush

25 Apr 19
ZigZag
Jenn Brandel and Mara Zapeda, the founders of Zebras Unite, compare venture capital investment money to steroids: it’s not healthy. Their “Zebra” network of companies are part of a growing backlash against Silicon Valley’s so-called “unicorns”–the 350 or so companies in the world, largely fueled by VC money, that are valued at over a billion dollars and, some say, hurting society. By finding new ways to fund more sustainable companies, Jenn and Mara say they see more and more companies able to make profits AND do good. It’s a vision that will intrigue anyone who is questioning the current state of capitalism and what responsibilities we all have to communities. This, of course, includes Manoush and Jen (Poyant), who debate whether this new investment model will work to help build their company, Stable Genius Productions.Season 4 of ZigZag is about examining the current culture of business, figuring out what needs to change, and experimenting with new ways to do it. Sign up for our newsletter and subscribe to the podcast for free on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioPublic, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify, or Breaker. CREDITS:Matt Boynton, Audio EngineerDavid Herman, ComposerMaria Wurttele, Production CoordinatorILLUSTRATION: Sara Wong
23 Apr 19
Stratechery by Ben Thompson

More on why giving information to investors often helps companies, then why Luminary, a new service for podcasters, is probably not going to succeed. Building bundles is hard!

22 Apr 19
9to5Mac
A new paid podcast service called Luminary is set to launch tomorrow on iOS, Android, and the web (via The Verge). It got off to a rough start last month as it announced the service with a controversial ad stating “Podcasts don’t need ads,” and tomorrow the premium podcast service will launch without some of the most popular podcasts found on Apple’s platform. However, its CEO, Matt Sacks, thinks that “podcasting has way more than enough room to go around.” As for the marketing tactic last month saying that podcasts don’t need ads, Sacks told The Verge “It was a mistake. It was a miss, and we own that. The bunny put a foot in our mouth.” He further clarified that the intended message was that podcast listeners should have a choice. “We really do feel like what we’re introducing is choice and optionality and trying to help elevate premium and paid podcasting, which would be good for creators and listeners, as well,” he says. But with both The New York Times and Spotify’s recently acquired companies withholding their shows from Luminary, the service will see some hurdles out of the gate. By withholding their shows, the Times and Spotify are setting Luminary up to fail — or at least struggle to get off on the right foot with users. It certainly seems like the first shot fired in the inevitable premium podcast war and could destabilize one of the first buzzy, well-funded entrants before it can make a dent in the industry. When the service launches tomorrow in the US, UK, Canada, and Australia, Luminary will offer users a free tier and a paid tier. The free tier will include many publicly available shows, but not all of them that are found on Apple’s Podcasts app for instance. The paid subscription runs $8/month after a free one-month trial and gives users access to 40 exclusive podcasts. Daily Show host Trevor Noah, Queer Eye star Karamo Brown, and Girls writer and actress Lena Dunham will all release shows, as will already established podcast stars, like Guy Raz of How I Built This, Manoush Zomorodi of Note to Self, and Adam Davidson of Planet Money. The more than 40 ad-free shows that Luminary has planned will come out on a rolling basis, and they won’t be available anywhere else but Luminary. But after the backlash Luminary saw to its “Podcasts don’t need ads” ad and popular shows not signing on, it looks to have an uphill battle building a user base, but CEO Matt Sacks is optimistic. Still, Sacks isn’t discouraged. The podcast industry is projected to grow enormously over the coming years, and Luminary’s subscription model and premium content could be part of that. The entire industry brought in $314 million in revenue in 2017, and it’s expected to grow to $1.6 billion by 2022, according to an Interactive Advertising Bureau / PwC report. Luminary will offer users personalized suggestions and is hoping the home screen of its app will give users a great experience for everything from discovery to finding new episodes of their favorite shows. For more on the podcast war that’s heating up, check out the full article from The Verge. For more about Luminary check out the service’s website here.
21 Apr 19
The Emporium of Lost Thoughts

Figure 1: Attribution: By Author [Fair Use], via Author Web Site I recently finished reading a very interesting book called “Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self” by Manoush Zomorodi. While some of the reviews I’ve seen are rather haughtily negative, I enjoyed this book. I already limit […]

21 Apr 19
paulpens

Much has been said about the limited attention spans of modern day audiences for every form of show business, be it music, television shows or Hollywood films. It takes an inexperienced author a while to realise that they too are entering the cutthroat world of show business, and that their act—which is their book—needs to […]

21 Apr 19
The Most Interesting Thing I've Seen Today

I am behind and have not kept up with my books, so I will work on a few posts today. In February, my goal was to read books in Spanish, but I find them more time-consuming and they slow me down.  I also don’t have notes, so I have to rely on mid-term memory, which […]

11 Apr 19
ZigZag
On the launch episode of Season Four, Jen and Manoush celebrate the first anniversary of their company, Stable Genius Productions, and share the most important and difficult entrepreneurial lessons they’ve learned over the past year. They also explain how, after a year of experimentation with format and blockchain technology, ZigZag is evolving into a podcast that takes an honest look at the culture of business–and what needs to change. Sign up for our newsletter and subscribe to the podcast for free on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioPublic, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify, or Breaker. CREDITS:Matt Boynton, Audio EngineerDavid Herman, ComposerMaria Wurttele, Production CoordinatorILLUSTRATION: Sara Wong
07 Apr 19
Amberlyn Holland

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.19.1″ background_image=”https://www.amberlynholland.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Header-fairy-tale-1.jpg” custom_padding=”229px|0px|0|0px|false|false”][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.19.1″][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.19.1″][et_pb_column type=”3_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″][et_pb_text admin_label=”amberlyn” _builder_version=”3.19.1″] [/et_pb_text][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.20.2″ title_font=”||||||||” title_font_size=”43px” max_width=”61%”] [/et_pb_post_title][et_pb_text _builder_version=”3.20.2″] I hate being bored. I prefer to have a book in my hand, a show playing on the TV, or pen and paper to create with. Sitting in waiting rooms, washing dishes, or twiddling my thumbs […]

06 Apr 19
NadiaCDM

The Idle Mind is the Daydream’s Playground: Inspired by Bertrand Russel’s Essay “In Praise of Idleness” and Manoush Zomorodi’s Book Bored and Brilliant Watercolor, ink and India ink on paper In his essay In Praise of Idleness, philosopher Bertrand Russell writes of the necessary role idleness plays in expansion. And I couldn’t agree more because, […]

01 Apr 19
THE ONLY WEBSITE YOU NEED

Supertransparency in the Age of Social Media This video relates to the concept of ‘supertransparency’ introduced in the paper by Austin and Upton (2016). The plaudits of this concept relate to how valuable and positive ideas can now spread incredibly rapidly and those who are willing to learn will be able to view these ideas […]

31 Mar 19
Measure with Coffee Spoons

Do you eat breakfast with your phone in front of you? Have you picked up your phone in the last 20 minutes? Are you addicted to social media or gaming apps? Do you get panicky if you can’t find your phone (or if the battery is less than 20%)? Chances are, you answered yes to […]

30 Mar 19
stepping on the cracks

You can find the introduction to the Bored and Brilliant experiment here. The first challenge in the Bored and Brilliant experiment is simply to observe your phone usage and to think about what you want to get out of the challenge. The brains behind the experiment, Manoush Zomorodi, suggests downloading the Moment app, which tracks how much […]

28 Mar 19
Press Telegram
Ammatoli Mediterranean Bites sits on a stretch of 3rd Street on the edge of the downtown core that’s gone from notable blankness, to a restaurant row in the making, an extension of the food-heavy Promenade that’s quickly turning downtown Long Beach into a lively destination for those of us who live to eat at the place of the moment. Or in this case, places of the moment, for new restaurants seem to be popping up by the minute. The big boy on the block is the sprawling Table 301, just down the street. But Ammatoli deserves more than short shrift, for despite the modest name, this isn’t just a place to go for “Mediterranean bites.” That phrase makes Ammatoli sound like a fast-food shop where you go for a falafel on pits, with some hummus on the side. And maybe a gyro sandwich as well. Yet the “bites” at Ammatoli add up to a full-service restaurant — a pleasant, sun-washed space, with a sizable following among those who long for mujaddara and grilled halloumi. And some of the best rotisserie chicken around. In the same way that Middle Eastern restaurants have a way with rice that’s nothing short of dazzling, there’s a positive Zen wonder to what they do with chicken. If you’ve ever been to any of the several branches of Zankou Chicken, you know that the birds that emerging from their spinning grills are impossibly juicy, almost obscenely flavorful. This is the sort of chicken where, even if you’ve sworn off the skin for the sake of your health, you find yourself nibbling on a crispy tid here, a crunchy bit there. Life is short — dig in! Getting a rotisserie chicken is certainly one of the easiest ways of ordering at Ammatoli. You have a choice of a quarter white or a quarter dark, a half, a whole, or a family chicken feast of two birds. The first options come with a choice of two side dishes; the last comes with four, drawn from crowd-pleasers like the hummus and the spicy hummus, the tahini salad and (for a bit extra) the tabbouleh, the grape leaves, the baba ghanouj and more. There’s a spicy, garlic, lemon chicken as well, half a bird with rice and two sides, which may actually be even better than the standard-issue rotisserie chicken, Though that does strain credibility. Or at least the capacity of my taste buds. And in terms of the menu, that’s just the proverbial tip of the Middle Eastern iceberg. (I know: A bizarrely mixed metaphor!) Indeed, Ammatoli approaches the encyclopedic in terms of its selection of dishes. One can, of course, as always, make a perfectly good meal out of nothing but the mezza — the small dishes — which come (if you want) as a six-dish combo, or a three-dish combo. A meal of hummus, tabbouleh, grape leaves, fried lamb kibbeh, falafel — what’s not to love? I’m especially fond of the hummus variation, topped with a choice of meats and pine nuts — ground beef, shawarma beef or shawarma chicken, it doesn’t much matter to me, for they’re all good. And I love the way the innate creaminess of the hummus lays off the semi-soft crunch of the pine nuts, and the salty-crispiness of the meats, sort of a celebration on your tongue. And the fried cauliflower, tossed with scallions and parsley makes cauliflower taste about as good as cauliflower can taste. But if you’re in the need of more, certainly the lamb, chicken, beef steak and ground beef kabobs are a source of much happiness. If you want to get away form the familiar, try the dish called samkeh harra, a grilled fish filet marinated in an unexpectedly spicy habanero pepper sauce. Habaneros? In the Middle East? Well, why not? There’s a Moroccan spiced salmon as well, sweetly described on the menu as “Your True Hearty Choice!!” A true hearty odd turn of phrase, complete with double exclamation marks!! There are several soups, more salads, semi-pizzas like the jibneh manoush cheese meted on flatbread, and the zaatar manoush, a flatbread topped with that madcap spice blend called zaatar. There’s a Lebanese beer on the menu, along with two Armenian beers, and sundry Lebanese wines. More great eats: LV Chinese Seafood in Long Beach dishes out nostalgia Desserts — the baklava, and the knafeh jibneh pastry filled with cheese are very sweet, as Middle Eastern desserts always are. The food is spiced and herbed, the desserts are honeyed — the end result is unabashedly pleasurable. This is Mediterranean cooking…with bite. Merrill Shindler is a Los Angeles-based freelance dining critic. Send him email at mreats@aol.com. Ammatoli Mediterranean Bites Rating: 3 stars Address: 285 E. 3rd St., Long Beach Information: 562-435-0808, www.ammatoli.com Cuisine: Middle Eastern When: Lunch and dinner, every day Details: Beer and wine; reservations important Atmosphere: Modernist, glass-fronted Middle Eastern cafe on the newly developed 3rd Street restaurant row, offering a wide selection of very tasty traditional Mediterranean dishes, including some exceptional rotisserie chicken. Prices: About $25 per person Suggested dishes: 19 Mezza (Appetizers) ($3.95-$9.95), Mezza Combinations ($15.95/$24.95), 14 Kebabs and Entrees ($12.95-$24.95), Kebab Feast ($68.95 for five), Rotisserie Chicken ($8.95-$23.95), Chicken Feast ($39.95), 9 Soups and Salads ($5.95-$14.95), 12 Wraps and Flatbreads ($6.95-$11.95) Cards: MC, V What the stars mean: Ratings range from 4 stars to zero. 4 stars is world-class (worth a trip from anywhere). 3 stars is most excellent, even exceptional (worth a trip from anywhere in Southern California). 2 stars is a good place to go for a meal (visit if you’re in the neighborhood). 1 star is a place to go if you’re hungry and it’s nearby. Zero stars is not worth writing about. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
28 Mar 19
SCNG
Ammatoli Mediterranean Bites sits on a stretch of 3rd Street on the edge of the downtown core that’s gone from notable blankness, to a restaurant row in the making, an extension of the food-heavy Promenade that’s quickly turning downtown Long Beach into a lively destination for those of us who live to eat at the place of the moment. Or in this case, places of the moment, for new restaurants seem to be popping up by the minute. The big boy on the block is the sprawling Table 301, just down the street. But Ammatoli deserves more than short shrift, for despite the modest name, this isn’t just a place to go for “Mediterranean bites.” That phrase makes Ammatoli sound like a fast-food shop where you go for a falafel on pits, with some hummus on the side. And maybe a gyro sandwich as well. Yet the “bites” at Ammatoli add up to a full-service restaurant — a pleasant, sun-washed space, with a sizable following among those who long for mujaddara and grilled halloumi. And some of the best rotisserie chicken around. In the same way that Middle Eastern restaurants have a way with rice that’s nothing short of dazzling, there’s a positive Zen wonder to what they do with chicken. If you’ve ever been to any of the several branches of Zankou Chicken, you know that the birds that emerging from their spinning grills are impossibly juicy, almost obscenely flavorful. This is the sort of chicken where, even if you’ve sworn off the skin for the sake of your health, you find yourself nibbling on a crispy tid here, a crunchy bit there. Life is short — dig in! Getting a rotisserie chicken is certainly one of the easiest ways of ordering at Ammatoli. You have a choice of a quarter white or a quarter dark, a half, a whole, or a family chicken feast of two birds. The first options come with a choice of two side dishes; the last comes with four, drawn from crowd-pleasers like the hummus and the spicy hummus, the tahini salad and (for a bit extra) the tabbouleh, the grape leaves, the baba ghanouj and more. There’s a spicy, garlic, lemon chicken as well, half a bird with rice and two sides, which may actually be even better than the standard-issue rotisserie chicken, Though that does strain credibility. Or at least the capacity of my taste buds. And in terms of the menu, that’s just the proverbial tip of the Middle Eastern iceberg. (I know: A bizarrely mixed metaphor!) Indeed, Ammatoli approaches the encyclopedic in terms of its selection of dishes. One can, of course, as always, make a perfectly good meal out of nothing but the mezza — the small dishes — which come (if you want) as a six-dish combo, or a three-dish combo. A meal of hummus, tabbouleh, grape leaves, fried lamb kibbeh, falafel — what’s not to love? I’m especially fond of the hummus variation, topped with a choice of meats and pine nuts — ground beef, shawarma beef or shawarma chicken, it doesn’t much matter to me, for they’re all good. And I love the way the innate creaminess of the hummus lays off the semi-soft crunch of the pine nuts, and the salty-crispiness of the meats, sort of a celebration on your tongue. And the fried cauliflower, tossed with scallions and parsley makes cauliflower taste about as good as cauliflower can taste. But if you’re in the need of more, certainly the lamb, chicken, beef steak and ground beef kabobs are a source of much happiness. If you want to get away form the familiar, try the dish called samkeh harra, a grilled fish filet marinated in an unexpectedly spicy habanero pepper sauce. Habaneros? In the Middle East? Well, why not? There’s a Moroccan spiced salmon as well, sweetly described on the menu as “Your True Hearty Choice!!” A true hearty odd turn of phrase, complete with double exclamation marks!! There are several soups, more salads, semi-pizzas like the jibneh manoush cheese meted on flatbread, and the zaatar manoush, a flatbread topped with that madcap spice blend called zaatar. There’s a Lebanese beer on the menu, along with two Armenian beers, and sundry Lebanese wines. More great eats: LV Chinese Seafood in Long Beach dishes out nostalgia Desserts — the baklava, and the knafeh jibneh pastry filled with cheese are very sweet, as Middle Eastern desserts always are. The food is spiced and herbed, the desserts are honeyed — the end result is unabashedly pleasurable. This is Mediterranean cooking…with bite. Merrill Shindler is a Los Angeles-based freelance dining critic. Send him email at mreats@aol.com. Ammatoli Mediterranean Bites Rating: 3 stars Address: 285 E. 3rd St., Long Beach Information: 562-435-0808, www.ammatoli.com Cuisine: Middle Eastern When: Lunch and dinner, every day Details: Beer and wine; reservations important Atmosphere: Modernist, glass-fronted Middle Eastern cafe on the newly developed 3rd Street restaurant row, offering a wide selection of very tasty traditional Mediterranean dishes, including some exceptional rotisserie chicken. Prices: About $25 per person Suggested dishes: 19 Mezza (Appetizers) ($3.95-$9.95), Mezza Combinations ($15.95/$24.95), 14 Kebabs and Entrees ($12.95-$24.95), Kebab Feast ($68.95 for five), Rotisserie Chicken ($8.95-$23.95), Chicken Feast ($39.95), 9 Soups and Salads ($5.95-$14.95), 12 Wraps and Flatbreads ($6.95-$11.95) Cards: MC, V What the stars mean: Ratings range from 4 stars to zero. 4 stars is world-class (worth a trip from anywhere). 3 stars is most excellent, even exceptional (worth a trip from anywhere in Southern California). 2 stars is a good place to go for a meal (visit if you’re in the neighborhood). 1 star is a place to go if you’re hungry and it’s nearby. Zero stars is not worth writing about. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]