Margaret Howell

15 Jun 19
The Mountain-Ear

Sara Sandstrom-Kobi, Nederland. The Nederland Middle Senior High School Theater Department spent an evening celebrating their accomplishments. The evening started with some special thanks to parents and volunteers who helped make this year’s productions a success.  The people recognized were: Theresa Bradley, volunteer coordinator. Kim and Mark Patterson, ticket coordinators, Angela Delsanter, aerial dance choreographer, […]

13 Jun 19
Graham and Val go Coast to Coast

Eyebrows were raised when we announced that we were planning spend a couple of weeks sampling the delights of Norfolk and Suffolk. Comments were made on the lines of, “Isn’t that a bit flat?” and by implication, a bit boring too. Well, there were a number of reasons for the choice. We hadn’t been to […]

12 Jun 19
Deadline

Now in its 37th year, Outfest serves up an inclusive and intersectional slate of programming, two-thirds of which includes content directed by women, people of color and trans filmmakers. The fest, which will be held July 18-28 in Los Angeles, will open with Rachel Mason’s documentary Circus of Books which spotlights L.A.’s iconic brick-and-mortar gay […]

12 Jun 19
GoldDerby
The made-for-TV movie was a programming staple for the broadcast networks in the 1970s and 1980s. While it fell out of favor in the 1990s and was even dropped as an Emmy Awards category for three years beginning in 2011, it has been on an upswing as of late. This year, 21 telefilms are in contention for the five nominations that will be revealed on July 12. All 22,000 plus voting members of the TV academy have until June 24 to cast their 2019 Emmy Awards nominations ballots for their favorite TV movies. In the past, voters were limited in the number of telefilms that they could put forth. In 2017 that cap (which was usually 10 per category) was lifted.  And, as opposed to the Oscars, voters for the Emmys do not rank their choices and nominees are determined by a simple tally. SEE 2019 Emmy nominations ballot: 732 programs vie for your consideration (that is 4 more than last year) Unlike comedy and drama series, which are simply listed on the ballot by name, the television movie submissions include the air date, plot description and cast list. “Agatha Raisin And The Curious Curate” – January 28, 2019 The arrival of a handsome new curate causes a stir in the village, but when murder strikes, one of Agatha’s friends becomes the prime suspect. As she works to clear her friend’s name, Agatha’s love life gets in the way of her investigation. Starring: Ashley Jensen, Jamie Glover, Mathew Horne, Matt McCooey, Lucy Liemann, Jason Merrells “Amor Vincit Omnia” (Sense8) – June 08, 2018 Passions run high as the Sensates and their closest allies fight to save the cluster and stop their enemies for good. Starring: Max Riemelt, Jamie Clayton, Brian J. Smith, Toby Onwumere, Freema Agyeman, Doona Bae, Tina Desai, Tuppence Middleton, Miguel Angel Silvestre, Naveen Andrews “The Bad Seed” – September 09, 2018 Executive producer, director and star Rob Lowe reimagines the iconic 1956 psychological horror film, The Bad Seed. Lowe stars as a single father who is forced to question the innocence of his daughter Emma when a terrible tragedy takes place. Starring: Rob Lowe, McKenna Grace, Patty McCormack “Bandersnatch” (Black Mirror) – December 28, 2018 In 1984, a young programmer begins to question reality as he adapts a dark fantasy novel into a video game. A mind-bending tale with multiple endings. Starring: Fionn Whitehead, Will Poulter, Asim Chaudhry, Craig Parkinson, Alice Lowe “Brexit” – January 19, 2019 Benedict Cumberbatch stars as the director of the ‘Vote Leave’ campaign for the Brexit referendum. A referendum which caused a political earthquake, laying waste to the normally stable British establishment, and laid the groundwork for tactics that proved vital to the year’s other political earthquake: the election of Donald Trump. Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Rory Kinnear “Deadwood” – May 31, 2019 In the “Deadwood” film, the indelible characters of the series are reunited after ten years to celebrate South Dakota’s statehood. Former rivalries are reignited, alliances are tested and old wounds are reopened, as all are left to navigate the inevitable changes that modernity and time have wrought. Starring: Ian McShane, Timothy Olyphant, Molly Parker, Paula Malcomson, Robin Weigert, Kim Dickens, Anna Gunn, Gerald McRaney, John Hawkes “End Of The Line” (The Romanoffs) – November 16, 2018 On a trip abroad to pursue their legacy, a couple faces destruction. Starring: Jay R. Ferguson, Kathryn Hahn, Clea DuVall, Annet Mahendru “Escaping The Madhouse: The Nellie Bly Story” – January 19, 2019 On a mission to expose the deplorable conditions and mistreatment of patients at the Women’s Lunatic Asylum, investigative reporter Nellie Bly feigns mental illness in order to be institutionalized to report from the inside. Starring: Christina Ricci, Judith Light, Josh Bowman “House Of Special Purpose” (The Romanoffs) – October 19, 2018 A movie star and a director go head to head in a battle over what is real. Starring: Isabelle Huppert, Christina Hendricks, Jack Huston “I Am Somebody’s Child: The Regina Louise Story” – April 20, 2019 The journey of a young African American girl who navigates the broken foster care system and the woman, Jeanne, who believes in her. After Jeanne’s unsuccessful attempt to adopt Regina due to a racially motivated ruling, their bond is forced apart, but 25 years later, they are reunited. Starring: Ginnifer Goodwin, Angela Fairley, Monique Coleman, Kim Hawthorne, Sherri Saum SEE 2019 Emmy nominations ballot: 2,313 performers vie for your consideration (that is 59 fewer than last year) “Icebox” – December 07, 2018 Fleeing gang violence, twelve-year-old Óscar leaves Honduras in search of his uncle in the United States. Óscar is apprehended by Border Patrol and placed in a processing center for migrant children. Trapped inside the “icebox” and a rigid immigration system, Óscar struggles for a chance at childhood. Starring: Anthony Gonzalez, Omar Leyva and Genesis Rodriguez “Kim Possible” – February 15, 2019 In this live-action adaptation of the hit animated series, Kim Possible learns that her famous crime- fighting history won’t help her navigate the perils of high school. When her arch-enemies Shego and Drakken strike, Kim must overcome her insecurities and team up with her friends and family to save the day. Starring: Sadie Stanley, Sean Giambrone, Ciara Riley Wilson, Taylor Ortega, Connie Ray, Issac Ryan Brown, Erika Tham, Maxwell Simkins “King Lear” – September 28, 2018 80-year-old King Lear divides his kingdom among his daughters, Goneril, Regan and Cordelia, according to their affection for him. When his youngest daughter, Cordelia, refuses to flatter him, hurt and angry Lear banishes her. With that fateful decision, family and state collapse into chaos and warfare. Starring: Anthony Hopkins, Jim Broadbent, Tobias Menzies, Jim Carter, John MacMillan, Andrew Scott, Emily Watson, Florence Pugh, Emma Thompson “Love You To Death” – January 26, 2019 Love You to Death is the shocking tale of a mother and daughter whose tumultuous relationship ends in murder. Camile seems the perfect mother to the sickly, wheelchair-bound Esme until Camile is found stabbed to death in her home, and Esme has vanished. Starring: Marcia Gay Harden, Emily Skeggs, Tate Donovan “My Dinner With Hervé” – October 20, 2018 Inspired by real events, My Dinner with Hervé explores an unlikely friendship that evolves over one wild night in L.A. between struggling journalist Danny Tate (Jamie Dornan) and actor Hervé Villachaize (Peter Dinklage), the Fantasy Island star who took his own life only days after his interview. Starring: Peter Dinklage, Jamie Dornan, David Strathairn “Native Son” – April 06, 2019 Bigger Thomas, a young African-American living in Chicago who is hired as a chauffeur for affluent- businessman Will Dalton enters a seductive new world of money and power — including a precarious relationship with Dalton’s daughter, Mary— facing unforeseen choices and perilous circumstances that alter the course of his life forever. Starring: Starring Ashton Sanders, Bill Camp, Margaret Qualley, Nick Robinson, KiKi Layne, and Sanaa Lathan. “New Year, New You” (Into the Dark) – December 28, 2018 In the era of “self-care” mania, a group of friends gather for a girls’ night reunion on New Year’s Eve. But as they rehash old memories and revisit an old party game of “Never, Have I Ever,” gripes and secrets they’ve been harboring manifest in nefarious and surprising ways. Starring: Suki Waterhouse, Carly Chaikin, Kirby Howell-Baptiste, Melissa Bergland “No One Would Tell” – September 16, 2018 An update of the 1996 movie, No One Would Tell explores physical and emotional abuse in teen relationships. Laura Collins, single mom to daughter Sarah, is thrilled when Sarah begins dating popular Rob Tennison. But later it becomes clear that Rob has a darker, threatening side. Starring: Shannen Doherty, Mira Sorvino, Matreya Scarrwener, Callan Potter “O.G.” – February 23, 2019 Filmed in a maximum-security prison, Louis is a retired leader of a prison gang, now in the final weeks of a 24-year sentence. His impending release is upended when he takes new arrival Beecher under his wing, and Louis finds his freedom hanging in the balance. Starring: Jeffrey Wright, Theothus Carter, William Fichtner “Victoria Gotti: My Father’s Daughter” – February 09, 2019 Narrated by Victoria Gotti, the movie takes us deep into what it was like to grow up as the daughter of mob boss John Gotti, revealing the glamour, glitz and unique hardships of Victoria’s world. Starring: Chelsea Frei, Maurice Benard “The Violet Hour” (The Romanoffs) – October 12, 2018 Set in Paris, an ancestral home holds the key to a family’s future. Starring: Aaron Eckhart, Marthe Keller, Inés Melab SEE 2019 Emmys calendar: Two-week voting starts June 10, nominations on July 16, ceremony on September 22 Be sure to make your Emmy predictions today so that Hollywood insiders can see how their TV shows and performers are faring in our odds. You can keep changing your predictions as often as you like until just before nominees are announced on July 16. And join in the fun debate over the 2018 Emmy taking place right now with Hollywood insiders in our television forums. Read more Gold Derby entertainment news. SIGN UP for Gold Derby’s free newsletter with latest predictions
11 Jun 19
Walter FitzGilbert de Hamilton

The original kinship groups that colonised early Virginia had intermarried in the eighteenth century, leading people to trace those associated with them to one strand or other of an original group. An example of this is the Kennon and Eppes intermarriages, which gave birth to a Harris family being assigned to those associated with Eppes, […]

10 Jun 19
Eliza Howell Nature Walks

Even when someone is able to locate a bird nest, that nest is usually in a location that does not allow for a good look inside; it may be in a tree cavity, high in a tree, or deep in a thicket. In my walks in Eliza Howell Park, I have, however, on occasion found […]

10 Jun 19
dru's book musings

Whitney Bloom first appeared in Cherry Pies & Deadly Lies and one of the best ways to learn about a person is by asking questions, so let’s get to know Whit. What is your name? Whitney Bloom, but my friends call me Whit. Back in high school, friend and academic nemesis, Jack MacLaren, used to […]

09 Jun 19
houseoffreudstein

BD. Severin. Region Free. Unrated. “We’ve got an emergency here… a break out of psycho patients!” Mad scientists…. a crazy bunch of bastards! Am I right or am I right? From Frankenstein to Moreau, Butcher to Dolittle, they’ve actually done very little to improve the human condition (which is generally their professed intention), more often […]

09 Jun 19
The Brighton Oratory

“And they continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and in prayers.” Acts 2:42 Kalendar DAY DATE OFFICE Notes SUN 09.06 PENTECOST SUNDAY . 07:30 Morning Prayers Chapel 08:30 Mass & homily Chapel 10:00 Breaking Fast Cosy Cafe MON 10.06 In the Octave of Pentecost St Margaret. 07:30 Morning […]

11 Jun 19
PhillyLacrosse.com

Phillylacrosse.com, Posted 6/10/19 The 2019 New Jersey South US Lacrosse All-Americans: Name High School Position Grad Year Ashley Vernon Shawnee High School Goalie 2019 Wayden Ay Haddonfield Memorial High School Midfield 2019 Mackenzie Boyle Red Bank Catholic Attack 2019 Ashley Campo Haddonfield Memorial High School Midfield 2019 Danielle Donoghue Ocean City High School Midfield 2019 […]

05 Jun 19
Robb Report

Plus, the best tasting room, wine festival, and up-and-coming winemaker.

05 Jun 19
Veronica Scott

I have another new release to report too! As always, I recommend sampling before you buy! I have not read most of the new releases listed (although I always end up one-clicking a bunch as I prepare these posts LOL). ***************************************************** BADARI WARRIOR’S BABY: MEGAN AND MATEER (SECTORS NEW ALLIES SERIES BOOK 8) by Veronica […]

04 Jun 19
East Bay Times
By Manuel Roig-Franzia and Beth Reinhard | Washington Post Jack Burkman and Jacob Wohl – a pair of boundlessly eager, profoundly unrepentant aspirants to the dankest depths of political chicanery – were watching television together the other day when something caught Burkman’s eye. There on the screen was Don McGahn, President Donald Trump’s former White House counsel. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] It was at that very moment when Burkman remembered that McGahn had connected the unlikely duo – Burkman, the 53-year-old Washington lobbyist, and Wohl, a 21-year-old Californian trailed by investment scandals. Yes, it was McGahn, they agreed, who had put them together a year ago by sharing Wohl’s cellphone number with Burkman before their spree of bungled smears – including a disappearing sex assault accuser against special counsel Robert Mueller (announced at a news conference that Burkman conducted with his pants zipper down) and a botched attempt last month to paint Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg as a sexual predator. Alas, Burkman’s juicy origin story about the formation of their partnership didn’t check out. That tends to happen a lot in their world. McGahn said through his attorney that he doesn’t know Wohl or Burkman. As it turns out, the truth or falsity of a Burkman-Wohl-concocted story is merely an inconvenience. Let the media’s “puritanical” fact-checkers puzzle it out: That’s the view of this twosome who fancy themselves as sub rosa players in the 2020 presidential contest and busy themselves trafficking in internet rumors they hope will damage Democratic candidates. Like notorious dirty tricksters before them, they operate in a realm where it matters little whether their claims are proved – they hardly ever are – but only whether they somehow slip into a corpuscle or two of the national bloodstream. But today it’s a more dangerous game: They operate in an era when notions about truth and fiction have been upended and in which many Americans get their information from self-affirming, partisan silos, making their brand of political cyberwarfare hyper-relevant. Though he wasn’t involved, Wohl speaks admiringly of the fringe effort to undermine Sen. Ted Cruz’s 2016 presidential campaign with loopy claims that the Texas Republican’s father was involved in President John Kennedy’s assassination. “That was good stuff,” Wohl says. “That was brilliant.” McGahn’s reaction to Wohl and Burkman claiming an association with him was similar to that of former House speaker Paul Ryan, whom Burkman had described over a recent lunch as his “best friend in Congress.” Ryan’s spokesman said simply, “That is not true.” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland, who Burkman had called his “only Democratic friend” in Congress, said through a spokeswoman that he doesn’t know Burkman, either. Burkman had also claimed to keep in touch with Kellyanne Conway, one of Trump’s most visible White House counselors. Via text, Conway said: “I’ve not seen or talked to him in years. Maybe 10-15-20 years??? We were in TV green rooms during Clinton impeachment. Be careful with that one!” And then there is Donald Trump Jr., the president’s son. Wohl claimed to be in contact with him. “Don wouldn’t be able to pick this guy out of a lineup if his life depended on it,” Trump Jr.’s spokesman said. Burkman’s role in the tag team is a bit convoluted – while claiming he seeks to hurt Trump’s Democratic opponents, he has also hinted that he might mount a primary challenge against Trump over his dissatisfaction with the president’s progress on building a border wall. During the 2016 campaign, Burkman took out a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Daily News condemning Trump, then later scheduled a fundraiser for the likely GOP nominee, even though campaign staffers said they didn’t know him. Burkman eventually canceled the event after receiving a stern letter of disapproval from none other than McGahn. Wohl, on the other hand, has appointed himself as an unaffiliated booster of Trump’s re-election effort. He talks of “amplifying” a speck of information here and there that would be helpful to the president’s campaign. “That detail could be true,” he says. “Or false.” ‘I never lose money on watches’ In his short, busy life so far, Wohl has been declared a teenage hedge-fund wunderkind, “the Wohl of Wall Street,” in media reports, and been barred from membership in a national futures trading association that looked disapprovingly at his alleged refusal to be interviewed about fraud allegations. One of his firms has been investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission in a case in which the agency decided not to bring charges, while adding that the decision “should not be considered an exoneration,” according to an SEC document. Wohl’s firm also agreed to a cease-and-desist order and paid a $5,000 fine and $32,000 in restitution after an Arizona regulatory commission concluded he had committed securities fraud via two hedge funds and a house-flipping venture. Wohl says he’s never faced a criminal charge or a lawsuit. “I think those are good indications that I’ve never done anything wrong with respect to any of my business ventures,” he says. Wohl also has boasted of launching several businesses, though their provenances are vague and their client lists even vaguer, and he has been banned from Twitter for allegedly creating fake accounts. (Before he was banned, Wohl says, his most cherished follower was Ivanka Trump – an assertion that actually appears to be true.) On Instagram, Wohl is prone to posting images of himself shirtless, staring into the camera with a come-hither look. He says he wants “what any other young man wants – fame and fortune.” In his public appearances, he favors tight-fitting suits and cultivates a serious demeanor. He swears by Garnier Fructis styling gel to shape his dark brown hair into a follicular architectural form with a gravity-defying ledge in the front. On his wrist, he wears a pricey Richard Mille RM 63 watch that he says he bought for a cut-rate price from an NBA player (whom he won’t name) in dire financial straits. “I flip watches,” Wohl says. “I never lose money on watches.” Wohl – whose father, David Wohl, was a Trump 2016 campaign surrogate – says he lives in Irvine but he has become a regular presence and active selfie-taker in the lobby at the Trump hotel in Washington. He is also a frequent guest at Burkman’s spacious Arlington townhouse, which they call “2020 Election Central” and say they plan to use as headquarters for a campaign to vet Democratic presidential candidates. The home is decorated with glass chandeliers, busts of Roman emperors and a lavender-accented four-poster canopy bed with sequined throw pillows. The aesthetic is a mishmash of ideas from the succession of women who Burkman says have come in and out of his life, staying for ill-defined lengths of time: “As long as anyone could like me.” The only room Burkman decorated himself is a nook with forest-scene wallpaper, a couch, stuffed animals and children’s books. That’s the domain of his irascible dachshund and almost constant companion, Jack Jr. Burkman says he is engaged to Margaret Howell, who has been an on-air reporter for the Kremlin-backed RT television network, the conspiracy site Infowars and Right Side Broadcasting, a Trump-loving live-streaming outfit. Burkman, who has faced at least one attempt on his life, is ever-shadowed by a security man named Luis armed with a Glock pistol. “Margaret is afraid somebody is going to come with a machine gun and take us out,” he says. Howell did not respond to an interview request. On his podcast, “Behind the Curtain with Jack Burkman,” Burkman opined not long ago about the “terrible rise of feminism” as one of the great dangers facing America. “If you ask a young girl in a big city like Washington or New York or Boston what’s on her mind, she doesn’t say, ‘Sexual harassment.’ She doesn’t say, ‘Workplace opportunity.’ You know what she says? ‘I can’t find me a man. Find me a rich man.’ “ Burkman has been equally explicit about the rules of engagement at his home. “I’ve made clear to Margaret,” he says, “that she must produce a boy.” ‘How does he get so many clients?’ Burkman grew up in Swissvale, Pennsylvania, a small town outside Pittsburgh. He says his father was active in local Democratic politics and his mother, whose family hailed from Sicily, was an arch conservative. “She had a picture of Mussolini in the house,” Burkman says. His brother, Jim Burkman, says that’s not so. In the 1990s and early 2000s, Jack Burkman, who had graduated from Georgetown Law, looked a lot like an establishment Republican. He was a Capitol Hill staffer for GOP congressman Rick Lazio of New York. He worked at Holland & Knight, a major law firm, lobbying on behalf of big corporate clients. He also worked briefly as a Fox News contributor and appeared as a pundit on CNN and MSNBC, leveraging a TV-ready look with a square jaw and a baritone voice. Once he formed his own firm, he built what became a thriving lobbying practice. In 2013, he signed more clients than any registered lobbyist, according to tracking by the media outlet the Hill. His firm’s revenue peaked that year at $3.52 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. “It’s always a curiosity to me – how does he get so many clients?” says his friend and law school classmate Raga Elim, who is now a lobbyist. Burkman was still far from a household name in 2014 when he hit on a topic that put him in the headlines and on news programs across the country. He proposed banning gay players in the National Football League around the time an openly gay football player, Michael Sam, was coming to prominence. Burkman formed an organization called American Decency and claimed to have signed up more than 3 million members. (Looking back, Burkman says that “it could be the case” that his claim about having that many members “wasn’t true.”) The next few weeks would play out like a preview of the next few years of Burkman’s life. Confusion ensued. A conservative group with an almost identical name issued a news release insisting it was not involved, but it took the opportunity to say it did “not condone the lifestyle of Michael Sam.” Burkman’s brother Jim, who is gay, took to Twitter to say Burkman was “being an ass.” The proposal went nowhere. For Jim, it was telling to watch his brother reveling in the attention. “That,” Jim says, “was when I realized he loved it.” Escaped an attack with his dog in his arms “I’m a lobbyist, and I couldn’t tell you a single congressman from Nebraska,” Jack Burkman says one afternoon. “And that’s the point.” Lobbying, after all these years, he says, has become a bore. He’s much more enthused about conspiracy theories, especially about the murder of Seth Rich, a Democratic National Committee staffer killed during the 2016 campaign. D.C. police and Rich’s parents say he was the victim of a robbery gone bad, but many right-wing sites remain fixated on the entirely unproven notion that Rich was the source of leaked DNC emails that roiled the 2016 campaign and that he was killed as a result. Burkman has a standing $155,000 reward for information about the killing. It was an endeavor that has been followed by all sorts of weirdness, including a break with Rich’s family, who initially appeared at a news conference with Burkman before becoming suspicious and disenchanted, and later disavowing his efforts. Glenn Selig, Burkman’s public-relations representative for the Rich project, was one of 22 people killed in January 2018 in a terrorist siege of a hotel in Afghanistan. “I don’t know who killed Glenn,” Burkman says. “It wouldn’t surprise me if the U.S. government was involved.” Later, Burkman asks a favor: “I don’t want you to call me a conspiracy theorist.” Then he pauses a beat. “Oh, go ahead,” he says. Two months after Selig’s death, Burkman nearly lost his own life. A onetime Marine whom Burkman had enlisted to investigate the Rich slaying lured him to a parking garage with promises of newly found clues, then shot him twice in the buttocks and rammed him with his vehicle before Burkman escaped with his dog Jack Jr. in his arms. Burkman has said that he and the attacker, Kevin Doherty, had a falling-out over their operation to crack the Rich case. Doherty was sentenced to nine years in prison. Burkman’s firm has gotten less business as he has shifted his focus to being a media personality, including hosting a show for a time on the conservative network Newsmax. In 2018, it logged $884,000 in fees, its smallest total in seven years, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. (Now, he says, he makes most of his income as a silent partner in West Coast gyms that he refuses to identify.) Denver Darling, president of California-based Darco Construction – which has paid Burkman’s firm $218,000 since 2018 for “a variety of bills and issues” that he declined to detail – said he’s “really not interested in any of that stuff” Burkman does in politics. Burkman has worked with companies seeking government contracts, but usually, he says, it’s more along the lines of “some rich guy in Idaho wants to come in (to a congressional office) and talk about the ‘deep state.’ “ Duo tried to bring down Robert Mueller The spectacle that is the Burkman-Wohl partnership launched late last year. The duo hyped a news conference promising to introduce a woman who allegedly claimed to have been raped by Mueller, the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. The woman was a no-show. Mueller asked the FBI to investigate allegations that women were offered money to make sexual assault claims against him. Burkman and Wohl no longer want to say much about their Mueller probe but have denied offering money for testimony. A few months later, on April 29, a shocking post went up on Medium, the self-publishing website. It was purportedly written by a 21-year-old gay college student named Hunter Kelly who claimed Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg had sexually assaulted him. Just hours later, the story started to unravel. “I WAS NOT SEXUALLY ASSAULTED,” Kelly posted on Facebook. In an interview with The Washington Post, Kelly said he met Wohl via Instagram and got a message from him asking, “Do you want to be part of a political operation?” Wohl’s pitch, according to Kelly, was to work on a Trump-backed project scrutinizing Buttigieg’s record on race relations. Burkman booked a plane ticket for Kelly, a student at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan. After they got to Burkman’s home, Kelly said, under pressure from Wohl and Burkman he reluctantly signed a statement alleging that Buttigieg had assaulted him in a room at the Washington’s Mayflower Hotel in February. Kelly claimed that he had not seen the Medium post before it went online and had not approved its publication. The whole story, he said, was entirely made up. “Those two are willing to do whatever it takes and to hurt whomever they have to hurt so they can keep the spotlight on them and get what they want,” Kelly told The Post. Kelly said he grew uncomfortable and called a relative to pick him up so he could slip out of Burkman’s house. Burkman and Wohl have mocked that suggestion, saying they took Kelly to get his hair cut at an expensive salon and bought him a caramel Frappuccino at Starbucks. Wohl and Burkman went ahead with a news conference even after Kelly recanted. Later Burkman expressed great delight that video of the event being interrupted by a loud garbage truck was widely shared on the internet. Burkman and Wohl dispute Kelly’s claim that they told him they were working at the behest of the administration or the Trump campaign, and they say he recanted only under pressure from family members. A Trump campaign spokeswoman said “this had nothing to do with the campaign.” But last month, Burkman tweeted: “Yes, President Trump is well aware of our efforts to investigate the 2020 field of Dem Presidential candidates.” A document published by the Daily Beast has laid out a plan of Wohl’s to raise $1 million for a business that would disseminate false information about Democratic presidential candidates to swing political betting markets. Wohl told the Daily Beast he had nothing to do with the document outlining the business plan for the “Arlington Center for Political Intelligence.” But, in an interview with The Post, Wohl acknowledged that the document was in fact a draft of his plan and that he had purposely misled the online publication because he believed it would not write about the document if he told it the truth. In this fact-challenged epoch, Wohl and Burkman feel they accomplished their goal of damaging Buttigieg, pointing to a dip in his valuation in European betting markets. Wohl says he tipped some “miscellaneous rich people in Newport Beach” – whom he refused to name – and they “profited handsomely” by shorting Buttigieg in advance of their allegations against the South Bend, Indiana, mayor. Asked whether that was akin to insider-trading scams in equities markets, Wohl says, “If this were stocks, you couldn’t do that.” Experts on political betting are skeptical, and they also note that it is illegal for Americans to trade on European prediction markets. “There is just no indication that anything they were doing influenced the price,” said David Rothschild, an economist who specializes in prediction markets. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Burkman’s prediction about his own future seems the unlikeliest of all. He claims he could self-fund a presidential campaign until Super Tuesday. Pressed about the long odds of his mounting a viable campaign, given his entanglements in scandal and his total lack of party support, Burkman thinks about it for a moment. Then he says, “You start with the fundamental truth that they think I’m nuts.” Yet, he says, he recently traveled to Iowa and attempted to meet with some Republican muckety-mucks. “I reached out,” he says. “Nobody returned my call.” The Washington Post’s Carol D. Leonnig, Alice Crites and Andrew Ba Tran contributed to this report.
04 Jun 19
The Mercury News
By Manuel Roig-Franzia and Beth Reinhard | Washington Post Jack Burkman and Jacob Wohl – a pair of boundlessly eager, profoundly unrepentant aspirants to the dankest depths of political chicanery – were watching television together the other day when something caught Burkman’s eye. There on the screen was Don McGahn, President Donald Trump’s former White House counsel. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] It was at that very moment when Burkman remembered that McGahn had connected the unlikely duo – Burkman, the 53-year-old Washington lobbyist, and Wohl, a 21-year-old Californian trailed by investment scandals. Yes, it was McGahn, they agreed, who had put them together a year ago by sharing Wohl’s cellphone number with Burkman before their spree of bungled smears – including a disappearing sex assault accuser against special counsel Robert Mueller (announced at a news conference that Burkman conducted with his pants zipper down) and a botched attempt last month to paint Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg as a sexual predator. Alas, Burkman’s juicy origin story about the formation of their partnership didn’t check out. That tends to happen a lot in their world. McGahn said through his attorney that he doesn’t know Wohl or Burkman. As it turns out, the truth or falsity of a Burkman-Wohl-concocted story is merely an inconvenience. Let the media’s “puritanical” fact-checkers puzzle it out: That’s the view of this twosome who fancy themselves as sub rosa players in the 2020 presidential contest and busy themselves trafficking in internet rumors they hope will damage Democratic candidates. Like notorious dirty tricksters before them, they operate in a realm where it matters little whether their claims are proved – they hardly ever are – but only whether they somehow slip into a corpuscle or two of the national bloodstream. But today it’s a more dangerous game: They operate in an era when notions about truth and fiction have been upended and in which many Americans get their information from self-affirming, partisan silos, making their brand of political cyberwarfare hyper-relevant. Though he wasn’t involved, Wohl speaks admiringly of the fringe effort to undermine Sen. Ted Cruz’s 2016 presidential campaign with loopy claims that the Texas Republican’s father was involved in President John Kennedy’s assassination. “That was good stuff,” Wohl says. “That was brilliant.” McGahn’s reaction to Wohl and Burkman claiming an association with him was similar to that of former House speaker Paul Ryan, whom Burkman had described over a recent lunch as his “best friend in Congress.” Ryan’s spokesman said simply, “That is not true.” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland, who Burkman had called his “only Democratic friend” in Congress, said through a spokeswoman that he doesn’t know Burkman, either. Burkman had also claimed to keep in touch with Kellyanne Conway, one of Trump’s most visible White House counselors. Via text, Conway said: “I’ve not seen or talked to him in years. Maybe 10-15-20 years??? We were in TV green rooms during Clinton impeachment. Be careful with that one!” And then there is Donald Trump Jr., the president’s son. Wohl claimed to be in contact with him. “Don wouldn’t be able to pick this guy out of a lineup if his life depended on it,” Trump Jr.’s spokesman said. Burkman’s role in the tag team is a bit convoluted – while claiming he seeks to hurt Trump’s Democratic opponents, he has also hinted that he might mount a primary challenge against Trump over his dissatisfaction with the president’s progress on building a border wall. During the 2016 campaign, Burkman took out a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Daily News condemning Trump, then later scheduled a fundraiser for the likely GOP nominee, even though campaign staffers said they didn’t know him. Burkman eventually canceled the event after receiving a stern letter of disapproval from none other than McGahn. Wohl, on the other hand, has appointed himself as an unaffiliated booster of Trump’s re-election effort. He talks of “amplifying” a speck of information here and there that would be helpful to the president’s campaign. “That detail could be true,” he says. “Or false.” ‘I never lose money on watches’ In his short, busy life so far, Wohl has been declared a teenage hedge-fund wunderkind, “the Wohl of Wall Street,” in media reports, and been barred from membership in a national futures trading association that looked disapprovingly at his alleged refusal to be interviewed about fraud allegations. One of his firms has been investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission in a case in which the agency decided not to bring charges, while adding that the decision “should not be considered an exoneration,” according to an SEC document. Wohl’s firm also agreed to a cease-and-desist order and paid a $5,000 fine and $32,000 in restitution after an Arizona regulatory commission concluded he had committed securities fraud via two hedge funds and a house-flipping venture. Wohl says he’s never faced a criminal charge or a lawsuit. “I think those are good indications that I’ve never done anything wrong with respect to any of my business ventures,” he says. Wohl also has boasted of launching several businesses, though their provenances are vague and their client lists even vaguer, and he has been banned from Twitter for allegedly creating fake accounts. (Before he was banned, Wohl says, his most cherished follower was Ivanka Trump – an assertion that actually appears to be true.) On Instagram, Wohl is prone to posting images of himself shirtless, staring into the camera with a come-hither look. He says he wants “what any other young man wants – fame and fortune.” In his public appearances, he favors tight-fitting suits and cultivates a serious demeanor. He swears by Garnier Fructis styling gel to shape his dark brown hair into a follicular architectural form with a gravity-defying ledge in the front. On his wrist, he wears a pricey Richard Mille RM 63 watch that he says he bought for a cut-rate price from an NBA player (whom he won’t name) in dire financial straits. “I flip watches,” Wohl says. “I never lose money on watches.” Wohl – whose father, David Wohl, was a Trump 2016 campaign surrogate – says he lives in Irvine but he has become a regular presence and active selfie-taker in the lobby at the Trump hotel in Washington. He is also a frequent guest at Burkman’s spacious Arlington townhouse, which they call “2020 Election Central” and say they plan to use as headquarters for a campaign to vet Democratic presidential candidates. The home is decorated with glass chandeliers, busts of Roman emperors and a lavender-accented four-poster canopy bed with sequined throw pillows. The aesthetic is a mishmash of ideas from the succession of women who Burkman says have come in and out of his life, staying for ill-defined lengths of time: “As long as anyone could like me.” The only room Burkman decorated himself is a nook with forest-scene wallpaper, a couch, stuffed animals and children’s books. That’s the domain of his irascible dachshund and almost constant companion, Jack Jr. Burkman says he is engaged to Margaret Howell, who has been an on-air reporter for the Kremlin-backed RT television network, the conspiracy site Infowars and Right Side Broadcasting, a Trump-loving live-streaming outfit. Burkman, who has faced at least one attempt on his life, is ever-shadowed by a security man named Luis armed with a Glock pistol. “Margaret is afraid somebody is going to come with a machine gun and take us out,” he says. Howell did not respond to an interview request. On his podcast, “Behind the Curtain with Jack Burkman,” Burkman opined not long ago about the “terrible rise of feminism” as one of the great dangers facing America. “If you ask a young girl in a big city like Washington or New York or Boston what’s on her mind, she doesn’t say, ‘Sexual harassment.’ She doesn’t say, ‘Workplace opportunity.’ You know what she says? ‘I can’t find me a man. Find me a rich man.’ ” Burkman has been equally explicit about the rules of engagement at his home. “I’ve made clear to Margaret,” he says, “that she must produce a boy.” ‘How does he get so many clients?’ Burkman grew up in Swissvale, Pennsylvania, a small town outside Pittsburgh. He says his father was active in local Democratic politics and his mother, whose family hailed from Sicily, was an arch conservative. “She had a picture of Mussolini in the house,” Burkman says. His brother, Jim Burkman, says that’s not so. In the 1990s and early 2000s, Jack Burkman, who had graduated from Georgetown Law, looked a lot like an establishment Republican. He was a Capitol Hill staffer for GOP congressman Rick Lazio of New York. He worked at Holland & Knight, a major law firm, lobbying on behalf of big corporate clients. He also worked briefly as a Fox News contributor and appeared as a pundit on CNN and MSNBC, leveraging a TV-ready look with a square jaw and a baritone voice. Once he formed his own firm, he built what became a thriving lobbying practice. In 2013, he signed more clients than any registered lobbyist, according to tracking by the media outlet the Hill. His firm’s revenue peaked that year at $3.52 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. “It’s always a curiosity to me – how does he get so many clients?” says his friend and law school classmate Raga Elim, who is now a lobbyist. Burkman was still far from a household name in 2014 when he hit on a topic that put him in the headlines and on news programs across the country. He proposed banning gay players in the National Football League around the time an openly gay football player, Michael Sam, was coming to prominence. Burkman formed an organization called American Decency and claimed to have signed up more than 3 million members. (Looking back, Burkman says that “it could be the case” that his claim about having that many members “wasn’t true.”) The next few weeks would play out like a preview of the next few years of Burkman’s life. Confusion ensued. A conservative group with an almost identical name issued a news release insisting it was not involved, but it took the opportunity to say it did “not condone the lifestyle of Michael Sam.” Burkman’s brother Jim, who is gay, took to Twitter to say Burkman was “being an ass.” The proposal went nowhere. For Jim, it was telling to watch his brother reveling in the attention. “That,” Jim says, “was when I realized he loved it.” Escaped an attack with his dog in his arms “I’m a lobbyist, and I couldn’t tell you a single congressman from Nebraska,” Jack Burkman says one afternoon. “And that’s the point.” Lobbying, after all these years, he says, has become a bore. He’s much more enthused about conspiracy theories, especially about the murder of Seth Rich, a Democratic National Committee staffer killed during the 2016 campaign. D.C. police and Rich’s parents say he was the victim of a robbery gone bad, but many right-wing sites remain fixated on the entirely unproven notion that Rich was the source of leaked DNC emails that roiled the 2016 campaign and that he was killed as a result. Burkman has a standing $155,000 reward for information about the killing. It was an endeavor that has been followed by all sorts of weirdness, including a break with Rich’s family, who initially appeared at a news conference with Burkman before becoming suspicious and disenchanted, and later disavowing his efforts. Glenn Selig, Burkman’s public-relations representative for the Rich project, was one of 22 people killed in January 2018 in a terrorist siege of a hotel in Afghanistan. “I don’t know who killed Glenn,” Burkman says. “It wouldn’t surprise me if the U.S. government was involved.” Later, Burkman asks a favor: “I don’t want you to call me a conspiracy theorist.” Then he pauses a beat. “Oh, go ahead,” he says. Two months after Selig’s death, Burkman nearly lost his own life. A onetime Marine whom Burkman had enlisted to investigate the Rich slaying lured him to a parking garage with promises of newly found clues, then shot him twice in the buttocks and rammed him with his vehicle before Burkman escaped with his dog Jack Jr. in his arms. Burkman has said that he and the attacker, Kevin Doherty, had a falling-out over their operation to crack the Rich case. Doherty was sentenced to nine years in prison. Burkman’s firm has gotten less business as he has shifted his focus to being a media personality, including hosting a show for a time on the conservative network Newsmax. In 2018, it logged $884,000 in fees, its smallest total in seven years, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. (Now, he says, he makes most of his income as a silent partner in West Coast gyms that he refuses to identify.) Denver Darling, president of California-based Darco Construction – which has paid Burkman’s firm $218,000 since 2018 for “a variety of bills and issues” that he declined to detail – said he’s “really not interested in any of that stuff” Burkman does in politics. Burkman has worked with companies seeking government contracts, but usually, he says, it’s more along the lines of “some rich guy in Idaho wants to come in (to a congressional office) and talk about the ‘deep state.’ ” Duo tried to bring down Robert Mueller The spectacle that is the Burkman-Wohl partnership launched late last year. The duo hyped a news conference promising to introduce a woman who allegedly claimed to have been raped by Mueller, the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. The woman was a no-show. Mueller asked the FBI to investigate allegations that women were offered money to make sexual assault claims against him. Burkman and Wohl no longer want to say much about their Mueller probe but have denied offering money for testimony. A few months later, on April 29, a shocking post went up on Medium, the self-publishing website. It was purportedly written by a 21-year-old gay college student named Hunter Kelly who claimed Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg had sexually assaulted him. Just hours later, the story started to unravel. “I WAS NOT SEXUALLY ASSAULTED,” Kelly posted on Facebook. In an interview with The Washington Post, Kelly said he met Wohl via Instagram and got a message from him asking, “Do you want to be part of a political operation?” Wohl’s pitch, according to Kelly, was to work on a Trump-backed project scrutinizing Buttigieg’s record on race relations. Burkman booked a plane ticket for Kelly, a student at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan. After they got to Burkman’s home, Kelly said, under pressure from Wohl and Burkman he reluctantly signed a statement alleging that Buttigieg had assaulted him in a room at the Washington’s Mayflower Hotel in February. Kelly claimed that he had not seen the Medium post before it went online and had not approved its publication. The whole story, he said, was entirely made up. “Those two are willing to do whatever it takes and to hurt whomever they have to hurt so they can keep the spotlight on them and get what they want,” Kelly told The Post. Kelly said he grew uncomfortable and called a relative to pick him up so he could slip out of Burkman’s house. Burkman and Wohl have mocked that suggestion, saying they took Kelly to get his hair cut at an expensive salon and bought him a caramel Frappuccino at Starbucks. Wohl and Burkman went ahead with a news conference even after Kelly recanted. Later Burkman expressed great delight that video of the event being interrupted by a loud garbage truck was widely shared on the internet. Burkman and Wohl dispute Kelly’s claim that they told him they were working at the behest of the administration or the Trump campaign, and they say he recanted only under pressure from family members. A Trump campaign spokeswoman said “this had nothing to do with the campaign.” But last month, Burkman tweeted: “Yes, President Trump is well aware of our efforts to investigate the 2020 field of Dem Presidential candidates.” A document published by the Daily Beast has laid out a plan of Wohl’s to raise $1 million for a business that would disseminate false information about Democratic presidential candidates to swing political betting markets. Wohl told the Daily Beast he had nothing to do with the document outlining the business plan for the “Arlington Center for Political Intelligence.” But, in an interview with The Post, Wohl acknowledged that the document was in fact a draft of his plan and that he had purposely misled the online publication because he believed it would not write about the document if he told it the truth. In this fact-challenged epoch, Wohl and Burkman feel they accomplished their goal of damaging Buttigieg, pointing to a dip in his valuation in European betting markets. Wohl says he tipped some “miscellaneous rich people in Newport Beach” – whom he refused to name – and they “profited handsomely” by shorting Buttigieg in advance of their allegations against the South Bend, Indiana, mayor. Asked whether that was akin to insider-trading scams in equities markets, Wohl says, “If this were stocks, you couldn’t do that.” Experts on political betting are skeptical, and they also note that it is illegal for Americans to trade on European prediction markets. “There is just no indication that anything they were doing influenced the price,” said David Rothschild, an economist who specializes in prediction markets. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Burkman’s prediction about his own future seems the unlikeliest of all. He claims he could self-fund a presidential campaign until Super Tuesday. Pressed about the long odds of his mounting a viable campaign, given his entanglements in scandal and his total lack of party support, Burkman thinks about it for a moment. Then he says, “You start with the fundamental truth that they think I’m nuts.” Yet, he says, he recently traveled to Iowa and attempted to meet with some Republican muckety-mucks. “I reached out,” he says. “Nobody returned my call.” The Washington Post’s Carol D. Leonnig, Alice Crites and Andrew Ba Tran contributed to this report.