Mary Kay

19 Jul 19
Daily Democrat
CHICO — It was standing room only at the Butte County Association of Government Chambers on Thursday, while the California Public Utilities Commission heard public comment on Pacific Gas & Electric Corp.’s request to charge its customers nearly $2 billion more over the next three years. The utility company says it plans to use the money to help pay for wildfire safety improvements and other costs. “The 2020 GRC proposal, which is the focus of Thursday’s public participation hearings, does not include costs associated with the 2017 and 2018 wildfires, said PG&E spokeswoman Kristi Jourdan in an email the day before the meeting. “PG&E has the authority to track costs from these fires, including costs associated with repairs, restoration, damages and third-party claims, in memorandum accounts but would have to seek authorization from the (public utilities commission) through a separate application to recover those costs.” The request for a rate raise must be approved by the commission and would give the utility company $1 billion above current rates in 2020, $454 million more in 2021 and $486 million more for 2022. For the average customer, Jourdan said, the rate raise would be approximately $10.50 more per month — $8.75 for electricity and $1.84 for gas. The meetings were held at 1 and 6 p.m., and numerous protestors showed up to make their voices heard against the utility giant, that Cal Fire found sparked the Camp Fire in November which killed 85 people. William Bynum, of Oroville, spoke to assembled protesters before the meeting began, telling them that he did not believe the state public utilities commission represented the interests of the public. “The bottom line is people should not be making profit off electricity or water or whatever people need to exist,” Bynum said. Chico City Councilwoman Ann Schwab also spoke in front of the protesters, saying that “it was time for PG&E to look for other ways to repair the damage and repair their infrastructure — not on the backs of us, who have been so damaged by their actions.” “Why are they allowed to be kings of our country? And you guys allow it,” says Oroville resident Helen Dennis. “Knock them down off that throne!” pic.twitter.com/27Lj0uDmJ8 — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 Inside the meeting, speakers ranged from stoically outraged to emotional, and many shared stories of their survival during the Camp Fire. “It can’t not be emotional,” Camp Fire survivor Susan Sullivan told the commission. “How do any of you sleep at night with what you’ve done?” She suggested to them that PG&E needed to be broken up and managed on a local level. Many were angry at the commissioners themselves for not providing better oversight of conditions that led to the Camp Fire and other fires in the past several years. Several speakers said they would be going with solar energy as soon as they could. Representatives from PG&E spoke before the public comment section and assured those assembled that the money from the rate raise would go toward wildfire prevention — not executive salaries or wildfire victim compensation. Outside the @PGE4Me rate raise meeting, Casey Parks with Chico’s Sunrise Movement places 85 black shoes in long rows — representing those who died in the Camp Fire last November. pic.twitter.com/NWq9RCYNax — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 State Senator Jim Neilsen, R-Tehama, who represents Butte County among others in the state legislature, also attended the meeting, and several speakers said they would not have known about it if not for the work of his office to get the word out. Thursday’s comments — and the comments from the meetings that have yet to be held in other areas of the state — will be entered into the record and considered as the commission makes a decision. However, Jourdan said the general rate case proposals have never failed at the CPUC hearing, and the proposal submitted is based on information that PG&E alone decides to include. “You know that what you’re doing is killing people, and that means you’re all serial killers,” Mary Kay Benson told the commissioners Thursday afternoon. “We are not going to just lay down and be collateral damage.” Similar meetings will be held in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, Santa Rosa, Bakersfield and Fresno. Members of the public can send comments by email to public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov.
19 Jul 19
New Delhi Times

House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, transforming an issue that once splintered the party into a benchmark for the 2020 election. Even though the bill has little chance of passing the Republican-led Senate, or being signed into law by […]

19 Jul 19
RochesterFirst
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, transforming an issue that once splintered the party into a benchmark for the 2020 election. Even though the bill has little chance of passing the Republican-led Senate, or being signed into law by President Donald Trump, the outcome pushes the phased-in rate to the forefront as the new standard, one already in place at some leading U.S. corporations. While the increase would boost pay for some 30 million low-wage workers, intended as one answer to income inequality, passage was assured only after centrist Democrats won adjustments to the bill. Reluctant to embrace the party’s left flank, they pushed for changes, including a slower six-year phase-in of the wage. It’s a reminder of moderates’ influence on policy, but also the limits. “We’re testing candidates from the presidential all the way down to the school board,” said Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union whose members cheered passage from the House gallery. To address stark income inequality, she said, “they have to raise wages.” A hike in the $7.25 hourly wage has been a top Democratic campaign promise, and what Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland called Thursday the “right thing to do.” “America’s workers deserve a raise,” said Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a press conference with labor leaders and employees ahead of voting. Lifting a young girl into her arms, Pelosi said, “This is what it’s all about… It’s about family.” The last increase in the federal minimum occurred 10 years ago, the longest stretch without an adjustment since the wage floor was first enacted during the 1930s. The wage protection covers millions of low-wage workers in all types of jobs. Under the House bill, for the first time, tipped workers would be required to be paid the same as others earning the minimum, boosting their pay to $15 an hour, too. It’s now $2.13, in what labor scholars call a jarring remnant from the legacy of slavery, when newly freed workers received only tips. Republicans in the House balked at the wage hike, which would be the first since Democrats last controlled the majority. Just three Republicans joined most Democrats in passage, on a 231-199 vote. During the floor debate, Rep. Ronald Wright, R-Texas, called it a “disastrous bill.” Republicans have long maintained that states and municipalities are already able to raise the wage beyond the federal minimum, and many have done so. They warn higher wages will cost jobs, especially among smaller business owners. Wright said the bill should be renamed the “Raising Unemployment for American Workers Act.” While opponents have long said higher minimum wages lead to job losses, economists say new studies are casting doubt on those long-held theories. A report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office sent mixed messages. It said more than 30 million workers would see bigger paychecks with a higher wage, lifting more than 1 million workers from poverty. It also said between 1 million and 3 million jobs could be lost. At time of wage stagnation and grave income inequality that’s playing out on the campaign trail, Democrats led by Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, are willing to accept that tradeoff. But swift passage earlier this year ran into trouble when centrists and those Democrats from rural regions and Southern states raised concerns. While the new Democratic majority is often seen as pushing the House leftward, many of the freshmen are actually moderates from districts won by Trump in 2016. Those same freshmen will face some of the toughest reelection races in 2020. The moderate Blue Dog Coalition, led by Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., advocated for changes to the wage bill. With some two dozen members, the caucus has enough votes to deny Pelosi a majority and sink the legislation. They wanted the longer phase of six years instead of five. And they included an amendment requiring a report from the General Accountability Office, after the first phases of the wage hike, to assess the economic impact on jobs and whether wages should be fully raised to $15. “I’ve always been one to believe compromise is not a dirty word,” Murphy said in an interview. “It has helped us get things done.” Most members of the Blue Dogs and another centrist caucus, the New Democratic Coalition, ended up voting for the bill. They also held the line against a Republican alternative. Progressives and labor leaders said they could live with the changes. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said the bill is popular back home and far from Trump’s characterization of Democrats as “socialists.” The idea of a $15 hourly wage, “somehow that’s an out-of-the-mainstream thought?” he said. “Of course not.” Advocates who have been trying to boost wages for workers for years said they were stunned at how quickly the debate shifted. Sara Jayaraman, president of the Restaurant Opportunities Center United, group founded with displaced workers from the World Trade Center after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, said boosting the tipped wages in particular, for waiters and other tipped workers, was a milestone. It’s “historic moment and a historic bill,” she said. “Once you start raising workers’ wages it’s hard to go back.”
19 Jul 19
Sendrak

Kartel by Pricetagg Lyrics (feat. Don Pao) Welcome sa kartel May collection at connection May action damig tulak pero di to kariton Sa sobrang daming runner kala mo may marathon Puro pasa sa scorer tawag sakin ay Lebron Bago ka ma tiktikan unahan mo nang tiktikin Bawat gramo timbangin taryahin sa salamin Di nyo pwedeng […]

19 Jul 19
KRQE News 13
LOS LUNAS/ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – An Albuquerque woman who fought a major legal battle with the city of Albuquerque has been found murdered. The Valencia County Sheriff’s Office says 54-year-old Mary Kay Brizzee’s body was found two weeks ago in a remote area west of Los Lunas. The department identified Brizzee Thursday through missing persons reports and dental records. KRQE News 13 profiled Brizzee in December 2018 as she was living in her home near Central and Eubank for roughly five months without electricity, running water or gas. “I want stability and by having my home, I feel safe,” said Brizzee in a December 2018 interview with KRQE News 13. At the time, the city was trying to evict Brizzee from her home. Brizzee eventually took the city to U.S. Federal Court, arguing it was her civil right to live in her home. “She told the city, ‘well, there’s homeless people out here now and you want to make another one,’” said Nathan Phillips, one of Brizze’s former neighbors. Phillips, who lived next to Brizzee for around 20 years, told KRQE News 13 Thursday he remembers his former neighbor as a nice, friendly, trusting person. “She trusted everybody,” said Phillips. The circumstances surrounding Brizzee’s killing are still unclear, however, some neighbors suspect that it may have been related to money. Neighbors say Brizzee gave up the legal battle over her home in April 2019, opting to trade in her now empty 20-year home for some cash. Court records show the case was dismissed after Brizzee, who was representing herself, failed to file a response in the case. “That was her plan, was to get this (equity of) redemption money, go buy a car and leave town,” said Phillips, who said Brizzee wanted a fresh start. Neighbors last saw Brizzee in late June. They filed a missing persons report when no one heard from her. Valencia County Sheriff’s deputies found Brizzee’s body on July 2 along the remote AT&T Road, west of Los Lunas. Deputies haven’t said exactly how they believe Brizzee was killed. “Well, I was sad for her,” said Phillips. “Obviously she ran into some people somewhere that weren’t as trusting, you know, and kind as she was.” The Valencia County Sheriff’s Office says so far, no suspects have been arrested or even named in the case. Investigators say they are looking into several persons of interest. If you have any information, contact the Valencia County Sheriff’s Office at 505-866-2400. Related Coverage: Homeowner fights city to stay in house without utilities
19 Jul 19
WTAJ
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, transforming an issue that once splintered the party into a benchmark for the 2020 election. Even though the bill has little chance of passing the Republican-led Senate, or being signed into law by President Donald Trump, the outcome pushes the phased-in rate to the forefront as the new standard, one already in place at some leading U.S. corporations. While the increase would boost pay for some 30 million low-wage workers, intended as one answer to income inequality, passage was assured only after centrist Democrats won adjustments to the bill. Reluctant to embrace the party’s left flank, they pushed for changes, including a slower six-year phase-in of the wage. It’s a reminder of moderates’ influence on policy, but also the limits. “We’re testing candidates from the presidential all the way down to the school board,” said Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union whose members cheered passage from the House gallery. To address stark income inequality, she said, “they have to raise wages.” A hike in the $7.25 hourly wage has been a top Democratic campaign promise, and what Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland called Thursday the “right thing to do.” “America’s workers deserve a raise,” said Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a press conference with labor leaders and employees ahead of voting. Lifting a young girl into her arms, Pelosi said, “This is what it’s all about… It’s about family.” The last increase in the federal minimum occurred ten years ago, the longest stretch without an adjustment since the wage floor was first enacted during the 1930s. The wage protection covers millions of low-wage workers in all types of jobs. Under the House bill, for the first time, tipped workers would be required to be paid the same as others earning the minimum, boosting their pay to $15 an hour, too. It’s now $2.13, in what labor scholars call a jarring remnant from the legacy of slavery when newly freed workers received only tips. Republicans in the House balked at the wage hike, which would be the first since Democrats last controlled the majority. Just three Republicans joined most Democrats in passage, on a 231-199 vote. During the floor debate, Rep. Ronald Wright, R-Texas, called it a “disastrous bill.” Republicans have long maintained that states and municipalities are already able to raise the wage beyond the federal minimum, and many have done so. They warn higher wages will cost jobs, especially among smaller business owners. Wright said the bill should be renamed the “Raising Unemployment for American Workers Act.” While opponents have long said higher minimum wages lead to job losses, economists say new studies are casting doubt on those long-held theories. A report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office sent mixed messages. It said more than 30 million workers would see bigger paychecks with a higher wage, lifting more than 1 million workers from poverty. It also said between 1 million and 3 million jobs could be lost. At time of wage stagnation and grave income inequality that’s playing out on the campaign trail, Democrats led by Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, are willing to accept that tradeoff. But swift passage earlier this year ran into trouble when centrists and those Democrats from rural regions and Southern states raised concerns. While the new Democratic majority is often seen as pushing the House leftward, many of the freshmen are actually moderates from districts won by Trump in 2016. Those same freshmen will face some of the toughest reelection races in 2020. The moderate Blue Dog Coalition, led by Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., advocated for changes to the wage bill. With some two dozen members, the caucus has enough votes to deny Pelosi a majority and sink the legislation. They wanted the longer phase of six years instead of five. And they included an amendment requiring a report from the General Accountability Office, after the first phases of the wage hike, to assess the economic impact on jobs and whether wages should be fully raised to $15. “I’ve always been one to believe compromise is not a dirty word,” Murphy said in an interview. “It has helped us get things done.” Most members of the Blue Dogs and another centrist caucus, the New Democratic Coalition, ended up voting for the bill. They also held the line against a Republican alternative. Progressives and labor leaders said they could live with the changes. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said the bill is popular back home and far from Trump’s characterization of Democrats as “socialists.” The idea of a $15 hourly wage, “somehow that’s an out-of-the-mainstream thought?” he said. “Of course not.” Advocates who have been trying to boost wages for workers for years said they were stunned at how quickly the debate shifted. Sara Jayaraman, president of the Restaurant Opportunities Center United, group founded with displaced workers from the World Trade Center after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, said boosting the tipped wages in particular, for waiters and other tipped workers, was a milestone. It’s “historic moment and a historic bill,” she said. “Once you start raising workers’ wages, it’s hard to go back.” Follow Mascaro at http://twitter.com/@lisamascaro.
19 Jul 19
Chowder Brand

Mary Kay TimeWise Age- Fighting Moisturizer Combination to Oily Skin https://t.co/wuXVEJNJr5 — Chowder Brand (@ChowderBrand) July 19, 2019 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/ChowderBrand

19 Jul 19
Paradise Post
CHICO — It was standing room only at the Butte County Association of Government Chambers on Thursday, while the California Public Utilities Commission heard public comment on Pacific Gas & Electric Corp.’s request to charge its customers nearly $2 billion more over the next three years. The utility company says it plans to use the money to help pay for wildfire safety improvements and other costs. “The 2020 GRC proposal, which is the focus of Thursday’s public participation hearings, does not include costs associated with the 2017 and 2018 wildfires, said PG&E spokeswoman Kristi Jourdan in an email the day before the meeting. “PG&E has the authority to track costs from these fires, including costs associated with repairs, restoration, damages and third-party claims, in memorandum accounts but would have to seek authorization from the (public utilities commission) through a separate application to recover those costs.” #gallery-1027256-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1027256-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1027256-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1027256-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ PG&E represenatives listen to Brad Nichols as he voices his concrens from the lectern during the PG&E rates hearing Thursday in Chico. (Matt Bates — Enterprise-Record) Protesters use signs and shoes to get their opinion across to PG&E officials outside the PG&E rates hearing Thursday in Chico. (Matt Bates — Enterprise-Record) Bob Mulholland uses handcuffs to emphasize his feelings that PG&E is criminally responsible for causing the Camp Fire during the PG&E rates hearing Thursday in Chico. (Matt Bates — Enterprise-Record) The request for a rate raise must be approved by the commission and would give the utility company $1 billion above current rates in 2020, $454 million more in 2021 and $486 million more for 2022. For the average customer, Jourdan said, the rate raise would be approximately $10.50 more per month — $8.75 for electricity and $1.84 for gas. The meetings were held at 1 p.m. and again at 6 p.m., and numerous protestors showed up to make their voices heard against the utilities giant, that Cal Fire found sparked the deadly Camp Fire in November which killed 85 people. William Bynum, of Oroville, spoke to assembled protesters before the meeting began, telling them that he did not believe the state public utilities commission represented the interests of the public. “The bottom line is people should not be making profit off electricity or water or whatever people need to exist,” Bynum said. Chico Councilor Ann Schwab also spoke in front of the protesters, saying that “it was time for PG&E to look for other ways to repair the damage and repair their infrastructure — not on the backs of us, who have been so damaged by their actions.” “Why are they allowed to be kings of our country? And you guys allow it,” says Oroville resident Helen Dennis. “Knock them down off that throne!” pic.twitter.com/27Lj0uDmJ8 — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 Inside the meeting, speakers ranged from stoically outraged to emotional, and many shared stories of their survival during the Camp Fire. “It can’t not be emotional,” Camp Fire survivor Susan Sullivan told the commission. “How do any of you sleep at night with what you’ve done?” She suggested to them that PG&E needed to be broken up and managed on a local level. Many were angry at the commissioners themselves for not providing better oversight of conditions that led to the Camp Fire and other fires in the past several years. Several speakers said they would be going with solar energy as soon as they could. Representatives from PG&E spoke before the public comment section and assured those assembled that the money from the rate raise would go toward wildfire prevention — not executive salaries or wildfire victim compensation. Outside the @PGE4Me rate raise meeting, Casey Parks with Chico’s Sunrise Movement places 85 black shoes in long rows — representing those who died in the Camp Fire last November. pic.twitter.com/NWq9RCYNax — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 State Senator Jim Neilsen, R-Tehama, who represents Butte County among others in the state legislature, also attended the meeting, and several speakers said they would not have known about it if not for the work of his office to get the word out.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Thursday’s comments — and the comments from the meetings that have yet to be held in other areas of the state — will be entered into the record and considered as the commission makes a decision. However, Jourdan said the general rate case proposals have never failed at the CPUC hearing, and the proposal submitted is based on information that PG&E alone decides to include. “You know that what you’re doing is killing people, and that means you’re all serial killers,” Mary Kay Benson told the commissioners Thursday afternoon. “We are not going to just lay down and be collateral damage.” Similar meetings will be held in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, Santa Rosa, Bakersfield and Fresno. Members of the public can send comments by email to public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov.
19 Jul 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
CHICO — It was standing room only at the Butte County Association of Government Chambers on Thursday, while the California Public Utilities Commission heard public comment on Pacific Gas & Electric Corp.’s request to charge its customers nearly $2 billion more over the next three years. The utility company says it plans to use the money to help pay for wildfire safety improvements and other costs. “The 2020 GRC proposal, which is the focus of Thursday’s public participation hearings, does not include costs associated with the 2017 and 2018 wildfires, said PG&E spokeswoman Kristi Jourdan in an email the day before the meeting. “PG&E has the authority to track costs from these fires, including costs associated with repairs, restoration, damages and third-party claims, in memorandum accounts but would have to seek authorization from the (public utilities commission) through a separate application to recover those costs.” #gallery-1390889-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1390889-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1390889-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1390889-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ PG&E represenatives listen to Brad Nichols as he voices his concrens from the lectern during the PG&E rates hearing Thursday in Chico. (Matt Bates — Enterprise-Record) Protesters use signs and shoes to get their opinion across to PG&E officials outside the PG&E rates hearing Thursday in Chico. (Matt Bates — Enterprise-Record) Bob Mulholland uses handcuffs to emphasize his feelings that PG&E is criminally responsible for causing the Camp Fire during the PG&E rates hearing Thursday in Chico. (Matt Bates — Enterprise-Record) The request for a rate raise must be approved by the commission and would give the utility company $1 billion above current rates in 2020, $454 million more in 2021 and $486 million more for 2022. For the average customer, Jourdan said, the rate raise would be approximately $10.50 more per month — $8.75 for electricity and $1.84 for gas. The meetings were held at 1 p.m. and again at 6 p.m., and numerous protestors showed up to make their voices heard against the utilities giant, that Cal Fire found sparked the deadly Camp Fire in November which killed 85 people. William Bynum, of Oroville, spoke to assembled protesters before the meeting began, telling them that he did not believe the state public utilities commission represented the interests of the public. “The bottom line is people should not be making profit off electricity or water or whatever people need to exist,” Bynum said. Chico Councilor Ann Schwab also spoke in front of the protesters, saying that “it was time for PG&E to look for other ways to repair the damage and repair their infrastructure — not on the backs of us, who have been so damaged by their actions.” “Why are they allowed to be kings of our country? And you guys allow it,” says Oroville resident Helen Dennis. “Knock them down off that throne!” pic.twitter.com/27Lj0uDmJ8 — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 Inside the meeting, speakers ranged from stoically outraged to emotional, and many shared stories of their survival during the Camp Fire. “It can’t not be emotional,” Camp Fire survivor Susan Sullivan told the commission. “How do any of you sleep at night with what you’ve done?” She suggested to them that PG&E needed to be broken up and managed on a local level. Many were angry at the commissioners themselves for not providing better oversight of conditions that led to the Camp Fire and other fires in the past several years. Several speakers said they would be going with solar energy as soon as they could. Representatives from PG&E spoke before the public comment section and assured those assembled that the money from the rate raise would go toward wildfire prevention — not executive salaries or wildfire victim compensation. Outside the @PGE4Me rate raise meeting, Casey Parks with Chico’s Sunrise Movement places 85 black shoes in long rows — representing those who died in the Camp Fire last November. pic.twitter.com/NWq9RCYNax — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 State Senator Jim Neilsen, R-Tehama, who represents Butte County among others in the state legislature, also attended the meeting, and several speakers said they would not have known about it if not for the work of his office to get the word out.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Thursday’s comments — and the comments from the meetings that have yet to be held in other areas of the state — will be entered into the record and considered as the commission makes a decision. However, Jourdan said the general rate case proposals have never failed at the CPUC hearing, and the proposal submitted is based on information that PG&E alone decides to include. “You know that what you’re doing is killing people, and that means you’re all serial killers,” Mary Kay Benson told the commissioners Thursday afternoon. “We are not going to just lay down and be collateral damage.” Similar meetings will be held in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, Santa Rosa, Bakersfield and Fresno. Members of the public can send comments by email to public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov.
19 Jul 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
CHICO — It was standing room only at the Butte County Association of Government Chambers on Thursday, while the California Public Utilities Commission heard public comment on Pacific Gas & Electric Corp.’s request to charge its customers nearly $2 billion more over the next three years. The utility company says it plans to use the money to help pay for wildfire safety improvements and other costs. “The 2020 GRC proposal, which is the focus of Thursday’s public participation hearings, does not include costs associated with the 2017 and 2018 wildfires, said PG&E spokeswoman Kristi Jourdan in an email the day before the meeting. “PG&E has the authority to track costs from these fires, including costs associated with repairs, restoration, damages and third-party claims, in memorandum accounts but would have to seek authorization from the (public utilities commission) through a separate application to recover those costs.” This slideshow requires JavaScript. The request for a rate raise must be approved by the commission and would give the utility company $1 billion above current rates in 2020, $454 million more in 2021 and $486 million more for 2022. For the average customer, Jourdan said, the rate raise would be approximately $10.50 more per month — $8.75 for electricity and $1.84 for gas. The meetings were held at 1 p.m. and again at 6 p.m., and numerous protestors showed up to make their voices heard against the utilities giant, that Cal Fire found sparked the deadly Camp Fire in November which killed 85 people. William Bynum, of Oroville, spoke to assembled protesters before the meeting began, telling them that he did not believe the state public utilities commission represented the interests of the public. “The bottom line is people should not be making profit off electricity or water or whatever people need to exist,” Bynum said. Chico Councilor Ann Schwab also spoke in front of the protesters, saying that “it was time for PG&E to look for other ways to repair the damage and repair their infrastructure — not on the backs of us, who have been so damaged by their actions.” “Why are they allowed to be kings of our country? And you guys allow it,” says Oroville resident Helen Dennis. “Knock them down off that throne!” pic.twitter.com/27Lj0uDmJ8 — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 Inside the meeting, speakers ranged from stoically outraged to emotional, and many shared stories of their survival during the Camp Fire. “It can’t not be emotional,” Camp Fire survivor Susan Sullivan told the commission. “How do any of you sleep at night with what you’ve done?” She suggested to them that PG&E needed to be broken up and managed on a local level. Many were angry at the commissioners themselves for not providing better oversight of conditions that led to the Camp Fire and other fires in the past several years. Several speakers said they would be going with solar energy as soon as they could. Representatives from PG&E spoke before the public comment section and assured those assembled that the money from the rate raise would go toward wildfire prevention — not executive salaries or wildfire victim compensation. Outside the @PGE4Me rate raise meeting, Casey Parks with Chico’s Sunrise Movement places 85 black shoes in long rows — representing those who died in the Camp Fire last November. pic.twitter.com/NWq9RCYNax — Robin Epley (@robin_epley) July 18, 2019 State Senator Jim Neilsen, R-Tehama, who represents Butte County among others in the state legislature, also attended the meeting, and several speakers said they would not have known about it if not for the work of his office to get the word out.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Thursday’s comments — and the comments from the meetings that have yet to be held in other areas of the state — will be entered into the record and considered as the commission makes a decision. However, Jourdan said the general rate case proposals have never failed at the CPUC hearing, and the proposal submitted is based on information that PG&E alone decides to include. “You know that what you’re doing is killing people, and that means you’re all serial killers,” Mary Kay Benson told the commissioners Thursday afternoon. “We are not going to just lay down and be collateral damage.” Similar meetings will be held in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, Santa Rosa, Bakersfield and Fresno. Members of the public can send comments by email to public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov.
19 Jul 19
WTRF
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, transforming an issue that once splintered the party into a benchmark for the 2020 election. Even though the bill has little chance of passing the Republican-led Senate, or being signed into law by President Donald Trump, the outcome pushes the phased-in rate to the forefront as the new standard, one already in place at some leading U.S. corporations. While the increase would boost pay for some 30 million low-wage workers, intended as one answer to income inequality, passage was assured only after centrist Democrats won adjustments to the bill. Reluctant to embrace the party’s left flank, they pushed for changes, including a slower six-year phase-in of the wage. It’s a reminder of moderates’ influence on policy, but also the limits. “We’re testing candidates from the presidential all the way down to the school board,” said Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union whose members cheered passage from the House gallery. To address stark income inequality, she said, “they have to raise wages.” A hike in the $7.25 hourly wage has been a top Democratic campaign promise, and what Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland called Thursday the “right thing to do.” “America’s workers deserve a raise,” said Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a press conference with labor leaders and employees ahead of voting. Lifting a young girl into her arms, Pelosi said, “This is what it’s all about… It’s about family.” The last increase in the federal minimum occurred 10 years ago, the longest stretch without an adjustment since the wage floor was first enacted during the 1930s. The wage protection covers millions of low-wage workers in all types of jobs. Under the House bill, for the first time, tipped workers would be required to be paid the same as others earning the minimum, boosting their pay to $15 an hour, too. It’s now $2.13, in what labor scholars call a jarring remnant from the legacy of slavery, when newly freed workers received only tips. Republicans in the House balked at the wage hike, which would be the first since Democrats last controlled the majority. Just three Republicans joined most Democrats in passage, on a 231-199 vote. During the floor debate, Rep. Ronald Wright, R-Texas, called it a “disastrous bill.” Republicans have long maintained that states and municipalities are already able to raise the wage beyond the federal minimum, and many have done so. They warn higher wages will cost jobs, especially among smaller business owners. Wright said the bill should be renamed the “Raising Unemployment for American Workers Act.” While opponents have long said higher minimum wages lead to job losses, economists say new studies are casting doubt on those long-held theories. A report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office sent mixed messages. It said more than 30 million workers would see bigger paychecks with a higher wage, lifting more than 1 million workers from poverty. It also said between 1 million and 3 million jobs could be lost. At time of wage stagnation and grave income inequality that’s playing out on the campaign trail, Democrats led by Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, are willing to accept that tradeoff. But swift passage earlier this year ran into trouble when centrists and those Democrats from rural regions and Southern states raised concerns. While the new Democratic majority is often seen as pushing the House leftward, many of the freshmen are actually moderates from districts won by Trump in 2016. Those same freshmen will face some of the toughest reelection races in 2020. The moderate Blue Dog Coalition, led by Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., advocated for changes to the wage bill. With some two dozen members, the caucus has enough votes to deny Pelosi a majority and sink the legislation. They wanted the longer phase of six years instead of five. And they included an amendment requiring a report from the General Accountability Office, after the first phases of the wage hike, to assess the economic impact on jobs and whether wages should be fully raised to $15. “I’ve always been one to believe compromise is not a dirty word,” Murphy said in an interview. “It has helped us get things done.” Most members of the Blue Dogs and another centrist caucus, the New Democratic Coalition, ended up voting for the bill. They also held the line against a Republican alternative. Progressives and labor leaders said they could live with the changes. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said the bill is popular back home and far from Trump’s characterization of Democrats as “socialists.” The idea of a $15 hourly wage, “somehow that’s an out-of-the-mainstream thought?” he said. “Of course not.” Advocates who have been trying to boost wages for workers for years said they were stunned at how quickly the debate shifted. Sara Jayaraman, president of the Restaurant Opportunities Center United, group founded with displaced workers from the World Trade Center after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, said boosting the tipped wages in particular, for waiters and other tipped workers, was a milestone. It’s “historic moment and a historic bill,” she said. “Once you start raising workers’ wages it’s hard to go back.” ___ Follow Mascaro at http://twitter.com/@lisamascaro
18 Jul 19
WSPA 7News
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, transforming an issue that once splintered the party into a benchmark for the 2020 election. Even though the bill has little chance of passing the Republican-led Senate, or being signed into law by President Donald Trump, the outcome pushes the phased-in rate to the forefront as the new standard, one already in place at some leading U.S. corporations. While the increase would boost pay for some 30 million low-wage workers, intended as one answer to income inequality, passage was assured only after centrist Democrats won adjustments to the bill. Reluctant to embrace the party’s left flank, they pushed for changes, including a slower six-year phase-in of the wage. It’s a reminder of moderates’ influence on policy, but also the limits. “We’re testing candidates from the presidential all the way down to the school board,” said Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union whose members cheered passage from the House gallery. To address stark income inequality, she said, “they have to raise wages.” A hike in the $7.25 hourly wage has been a top Democratic campaign promise, and what Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland called Thursday the “right thing to do.” “America’s workers deserve a raise,” said Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a press conference with labor leaders and employees ahead of voting. Lifting a young girl into her arms, Pelosi said, “This is what it’s all about… It’s about family.” The last increase in the federal minimum occurred 10 years ago, the longest stretch without an adjustment since the wage floor was first enacted during the 1930s. The wage protection covers millions of low-wage workers in all types of jobs. Under the House bill, for the first time, tipped workers would be required to be paid the same as others earning the minimum, boosting their pay to $15 an hour, too. It’s now $2.13, in what labor scholars call a jarring remnant from the legacy of slavery, when newly freed workers received only tips. Republicans in the House balked at the wage hike, which would be the first since Democrats last controlled the majority. Just three Republicans joined most Democrats in passage, on a 231-199 vote. During the floor debate, Rep. Ronald Wright, R-Texas, called it a “disastrous bill.” Republicans have long maintained that states and municipalities are already able to raise the wage beyond the federal minimum, and many have done so. They warn higher wages will cost jobs, especially among smaller business owners. Wright said the bill should be renamed the “Raising Unemployment for American Workers Act.” While opponents have long said higher minimum wages lead to job losses, economists say new studies are casting doubt on those long-held theories. A report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office sent mixed messages. It said more than 30 million workers would see bigger paychecks with a higher wage, lifting more than 1 million workers from poverty. It also said between 1 million and 3 million jobs could be lost. At time of wage stagnation and grave income inequality that’s playing out on the campaign trail, Democrats led by Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, are willing to accept that tradeoff. But swift passage earlier this year ran into trouble when centrists and those Democrats from rural regions and Southern states raised concerns. While the new Democratic majority is often seen as pushing the House leftward, many of the freshmen are actually moderates from districts won by Trump in 2016. Those same freshmen will face some of the toughest reelection races in 2020. The moderate Blue Dog Coalition, led by Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., advocated for changes to the wage bill. With some two dozen members, the caucus has enough votes to deny Pelosi a majority and sink the legislation. They wanted the longer phase of six years instead of five. And they included an amendment requiring a report from the General Accountability Office, after the first phases of the wage hike, to assess the economic impact on jobs and whether wages should be fully raised to $15. “I’ve always been one to believe compromise is not a dirty word,” Murphy said in an interview. “It has helped us get things done.” Most members of the Blue Dogs and another centrist caucus, the New Democratic Coalition, ended up voting for the bill. They also held the line against a Republican alternative. Progressives and labor leaders said they could live with the changes. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said the bill is popular back home and far from Trump’s characterization of Democrats as “socialists.” The idea of a $15 hourly wage, “somehow that’s an out-of-the-mainstream thought?” he said. “Of course not.” Advocates who have been trying to boost wages for workers for years said they were stunned at how quickly the debate shifted. Sara Jayaraman, president of the Restaurant Opportunities Center United, group founded with displaced workers from the World Trade Center after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, said boosting the tipped wages in particular, for waiters and other tipped workers, was a milestone. It’s “historic moment and a historic bill,” she said. “Once you start raising workers’ wages it’s hard to go back.” ___ Follow Mascaro at http://twitter.com/@lisamascaro
18 Jul 19
Black America Web

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats approved legislation Thursday to raise the federal minimum wage for the first time in a decade, to $15 an hour, showcasing the progress and challenge of a signature issue for the party ahead of the 2020 election. The increase, which would boost pay for some 30 million low-wage workers, is […]