Mega Bloks American Girl

02 Oct 18
Mylenium's Brick Corner

While this little blog will quite likely always be primarily focused on LEGO, there’s of course no harm in looking out at other shores. That’s why I’ve decided to start a series of articles looking at some alternate brick-based systems and how they compare to LEGO. This will be limited by how I get my […]

19 Sep 18
Hip2Save
While supplies last, hop on over to Walmart.com where they have select action figures and toys on clearance! This is a great time to be thinking of stocking stuffers or toys to set aside for Christmas gifts! Check out these hot deals… Mega Construx American Girl Mia’s Hockey Practice Building Kit Only $4.71 (regularly $20.40) Mega Construx American Girl Saige’s Balloon Festival Construction Set Only $12.25 (regularly $20.07) Mega Bloks Shimmer and Shine Genie Market Only $12.99 (regularly $29.99) Ultimate Spider-Man vs. The Sinister Six: Titan Hero Series Marvel’s Sandman Only $2.98 (regularly $9.56) Marvel Super Hero Mashers Groot Figure Only $6.90 (regularly $13.80) Star Wars Classic 19″ C-3PO w/ Silver Leg Only $5.98 (regularly $19.99) Jakks Pacific Big-Figs Warcraft Durotan 18″ Action Figure Only $18.99 (regularly $39.99) Now that you have the kid’s toys, how about something for you?
19 Sep 18
Hip2Save

Wow! Lots of toys are marked down including American Girl, Warcraft & more!

19 Sep 18
The Daily Marijuana Observer

With a valuation over $20 billion, Tilray is officially more than double the size of some of the most widely known businesses in the world…

09 Jul 18
reviewsexpert

A selection of the best shopping lists on the web for 7/9/2018

04 Jul 18
iLikeDeals.net

This was $48 earlier in the week and is now just $36.99, the lowest price ever on Amazon with free shipping!         Buildable two-story house with real fabric details Rebuild for two unique play sets in one package Buildable rooms include a living room, kitchen, and garden, or a bakery and bedroom […]

27 Jun 18
Montgomery City-County Public Library

Montgomery City-County Public Library July 2018   Governor’s Square Branch Library Summer Reading Programs Mondays @ 10:00 a.m. Grades K-5th July 2: Movie Day, Brave July 10: Awards Party Preschool Summer Reading Tuesdays @10:00 a.m. Ages 3-5 July 3: Sara Kunau and Callie Patterson,  Alabama Department of Archives and History, will present “Alabama Music’, describing […]

04 Jun 18
Buyer Sage

? 3 unique, highly detailed, fully articulated American Girl(R) mini figures;? Combines with other Mega Bloks(R) American Girl(R) playsets;? Includes 8 hairstyles, 4 skirts, 3 purses, 2 pairs of glasses & a hat;

04 Jun 18
Buyer Sage

? Buildable art studio with easel, paint table & real fabric details;? 1 highly detailed, fully articulated Saige(TM) mini figure with signature outfit;? Combines with other Mega Bloks(R) American Girl(R) playsets;? Includes sliding fabric curtain, sink, paint cans, hanging plants, 3 canvasses, picture frame, rug, foldable book, blender, drink & exclusive story book;

04 Jun 18
Buyer Sage

? Buildable bakery cart with cash register;? 1 highly detailed, fully articulated Grace(TM) mini figure with signature outfit;? Combines with other Mega Bloks(R) American Girl(R) playsets;? Includes fabric apron, buildable menu sign, cupcakes, macaroons, cake slice, donuts, foldable book & exclusive story book;

26 Apr 18
Press Telegram
Mattel, home of Barbie and Thomas the Tank Engine, has struggled for years trying to manage its way out of its problems. Enter Ynon Kreiz, 53, the El Segundo-based toymaker’s fourth chief executive officer in four years. Investors hope he can get Mattel back in the game of making cool toys and, like its rivals Hasbro Inc. and Lego A/S, develop movies, TV shows and online content to sell them. In a hint of what may be coming, Kreiz told employees last week at a town hall at Mattel’s headquarters that he would focus on fostering creativity and expanding how Mattel uses its brands. Kreiz is clearly cast in the savior role. He’ll face Wall Street for the first time Thursday when Mattel reports first-quarter results after the close of U.S. markets. Kreiz kicks off his reign at a time when Mattel faces formidable obstacles. Toys “R” Us Inc., the toymaker’s second-largest customer after Walmart Inc., filed for bankruptcy in September and in March began the liquidation of its U.S. and U.K. operations. And several of Mattel’s big brands, like Fisher-Price and American Girl, are struggling. Investors are looking for a turnaround. “Mattel has a big opportunity over the longer term because they’ve got brands that were under-utilized,” said Gerrick Johnson, a BMO Capital Markets analyst. “But Toys ‘R’ Us is a bigger disruption than investors realize.” At the start of the decade, Mattel executives imported from Kraft Foods Inc. focused on operational efficiency. Product development took a back seat. Wringing out margin gains at the world’s biggest toymaker was what got executives promoted. Evergreen Brands It worked for a while. But by 2014, it became apparent that the sales boost from major acquisitions, such as Thomas and Mega Bloks, was masking the deterioration of evergreen brands like Barbie and Fisher-Price and drying up the pipeline of new, in-house toys. The triumph of management science over creativity had run its course. Shares have dropped 72 percent since the beginning of 2014. Mattel now trails Hasbro and Lego in revenue. Kreiz will be expected to succeed where the last two CEOs, Margo Georgiadis and Chris Sinclair, fell short. Georgiadis, a former McKinsey & Co. consultant, had been running a major sales division for Google. After becoming CEO in February 2017, she diagnosed Mattel’s woes as mostly operational and not having enough playthings that crossed over to the internet and other digital content. After a few months on the job, she slashed the dividend to fund the makeover, which tanked the stock. Georgiadis revamped the executive ranks and recruited Kreiz to the board, calling him a “disruptive thinker” who would help transform intellectual property to create new content and experiences. She also discontinued lackluster toy lines, expanded gaming, enacted a $650 million cost-cutting plan and tried to speed up product cycles that often last a year or longer. But results worsened, and she took to calling 2017 a “reset” year. She left last week for another job. In February, Mattel named Kreiz chairman, effective at the shareholders meeting in May. Just after the announcement, he attended the toy fair in New York to see the company’s latest offerings and get a better sense of its challenges. Content Machines One hurdle for Mattel has been that its strategy on entertainment has been a step slower than Hasbro and Lego. While competitors were morphing into content machines, producing movies, television shows and online video, Mattel, in just one example, spent years trying to get a Barbie feature film made. If Hasbro can transform dormant brands like Transformers and My Little Pony into thriving entertainment franchises, why couldn’t Mattel do the same? Kreiz, an Israeli who’s been described in press accounts as a driven workout junkie, made his first mark in the mid 1990s, just a few years out of business school. Haim Saban, a children’s TV producer known for “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers,” hired him to start Fox Kids Europe from scratch. Within a couple years, the channel was available in 28 countries and had a $1 billion valuation. Coincidentally, Brian Goldner, the Hasbro CEO, also got his start with Saban, adopting for Hasbro the Power Rangers template of first creating entertainment and then selling the toys to kids who watch. Next, Kreiz revamped Endemol, a European producer of reality TV shows like “Big Brother.” He later took the reins at Maker Studios, a digital-video publishing network, after, as was the case with Mattel, starting as a board member. The company was a pioneer in user-generated content on platforms like YouTube, and was acquired in 2014 by Walt Disney Co. for $675 million. “He has precisely the background you’d want,” said Johnson of BMO Capital Markets. “If you’re going to find someone who doesn’t have any toy experience, his resume is probably one of the best resumes you could find.”
26 Apr 18
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Mattel, home of Barbie and Thomas the Tank Engine, has struggled for years trying to manage its way out of its problems. Enter Ynon Kreiz, 53, the El Segundo-based toymaker’s fourth chief executive officer in four years. Investors hope he can get Mattel back in the game of making cool toys and, like its rivals Hasbro Inc. and Lego A/S, develop movies, TV shows and online content to sell them. In a hint of what may be coming, Kreiz told employees last week at a town hall at Mattel’s headquarters that he would focus on fostering creativity and expanding how Mattel uses its brands. Kreiz is clearly cast in the savior role. He’ll face Wall Street for the first time Thursday when Mattel reports first-quarter results after the close of U.S. markets. Kreiz kicks off his reign at a time when Mattel faces formidable obstacles. Toys “R” Us Inc., the toymaker’s second-largest customer after Walmart Inc., filed for bankruptcy in September and in March began the liquidation of its U.S. and U.K. operations. And several of Mattel’s big brands, like Fisher-Price and American Girl, are struggling. Investors are looking for a turnaround. “Mattel has a big opportunity over the longer term because they’ve got brands that were under-utilized,” said Gerrick Johnson, a BMO Capital Markets analyst. “But Toys ‘R’ Us is a bigger disruption than investors realize.” At the start of the decade, Mattel executives imported from Kraft Foods Inc. focused on operational efficiency. Product development took a back seat. Wringing out margin gains at the world’s biggest toymaker was what got executives promoted. Evergreen Brands It worked for a while. But by 2014, it became apparent that the sales boost from major acquisitions, such as Thomas and Mega Bloks, was masking the deterioration of evergreen brands like Barbie and Fisher-Price and drying up the pipeline of new, in-house toys. The triumph of management science over creativity had run its course. Shares have dropped 72 percent since the beginning of 2014. Mattel now trails Hasbro and Lego in revenue. Kreiz will be expected to succeed where the last two CEOs, Margo Georgiadis and Chris Sinclair, fell short. Georgiadis, a former McKinsey & Co. consultant, had been running a major sales division for Google. After becoming CEO in February 2017, she diagnosed Mattel’s woes as mostly operational and not having enough playthings that crossed over to the internet and other digital content. After a few months on the job, she slashed the dividend to fund the makeover, which tanked the stock. Georgiadis revamped the executive ranks and recruited Kreiz to the board, calling him a “disruptive thinker” who would help transform intellectual property to create new content and experiences. She also discontinued lackluster toy lines, expanded gaming, enacted a $650 million cost-cutting plan and tried to speed up product cycles that often last a year or longer. But results worsened, and she took to calling 2017 a “reset” year. She left last week for another job. In February, Mattel named Kreiz chairman, effective at the shareholders meeting in May. Just after the announcement, he attended the toy fair in New York to see the company’s latest offerings and get a better sense of its challenges. Content Machines One hurdle for Mattel has been that its strategy on entertainment has been a step slower than Hasbro and Lego. While competitors were morphing into content machines, producing movies, television shows and online video, Mattel, in just one example, spent years trying to get a Barbie feature film made. If Hasbro can transform dormant brands like Transformers and My Little Pony into thriving entertainment franchises, why couldn’t Mattel do the same? Kreiz, an Israeli who’s been described in press accounts as a driven workout junkie, made his first mark in the mid 1990s, just a few years out of business school. Haim Saban, a children’s TV producer known for “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers,” hired him to start Fox Kids Europe from scratch. Within a couple years, the channel was available in 28 countries and had a $1 billion valuation. Coincidentally, Brian Goldner, the Hasbro CEO, also got his start with Saban, adopting for Hasbro the Power Rangers template of first creating entertainment and then selling the toys to kids who watch. Next, Kreiz revamped Endemol, a European producer of reality TV shows like “Big Brother.” He later took the reins at Maker Studios, a digital-video publishing network, after, as was the case with Mattel, starting as a board member. The company was a pioneer in user-generated content on platforms like YouTube, and was acquired in 2014 by Walt Disney Co. for $675 million. “He has precisely the background you’d want,” said Johnson of BMO Capital Markets. “If you’re going to find someone who doesn’t have any toy experience, his resume is probably one of the best resumes you could find.”
26 Apr 18
Orange County Register
Mattel, home of Barbie and Thomas the Tank Engine, has struggled for years trying to manage its way out of its problems. Enter Ynon Kreiz, 53, the El Segundo-based toymaker’s fourth chief executive officer in four years. Investors hope he can get Mattel back in the game of making cool toys and, like its rivals Hasbro Inc. and Lego A/S, develop movies, TV shows and online content to sell them. In a hint of what may be coming, Kreiz told employees last week at a town hall at Mattel’s headquarters that he would focus on fostering creativity and expanding how Mattel uses its brands. Kreiz is clearly cast in the savior role. He’ll face Wall Street for the first time Thursday when Mattel reports first-quarter results after the close of U.S. markets. Kreiz kicks off his reign at a time when Mattel faces formidable obstacles. Toys “R” Us Inc., the toymaker’s second-largest customer after Walmart Inc., filed for bankruptcy in September and in March began the liquidation of its U.S. and U.K. operations. And several of Mattel’s big brands, like Fisher-Price and American Girl, are struggling. Investors are looking for a turnaround. “Mattel has a big opportunity over the longer term because they’ve got brands that were under-utilized,” said Gerrick Johnson, a BMO Capital Markets analyst. “But Toys ‘R’ Us is a bigger disruption than investors realize.” At the start of the decade, Mattel executives imported from Kraft Foods Inc. focused on operational efficiency. Product development took a back seat. Wringing out margin gains at the world’s biggest toymaker was what got executives promoted. Evergreen Brands It worked for a while. But by 2014, it became apparent that the sales boost from major acquisitions, such as Thomas and Mega Bloks, was masking the deterioration of evergreen brands like Barbie and Fisher-Price and drying up the pipeline of new, in-house toys. The triumph of management science over creativity had run its course. Shares have dropped 72 percent since the beginning of 2014. Mattel now trails Hasbro and Lego in revenue. Kreiz will be expected to succeed where the last two CEOs, Margo Georgiadis and Chris Sinclair, fell short. Georgiadis, a former McKinsey & Co. consultant, had been running a major sales division for Google. After becoming CEO in February 2017, she diagnosed Mattel’s woes as mostly operational and not having enough playthings that crossed over to the internet and other digital content. After a few months on the job, she slashed the dividend to fund the makeover, which tanked the stock. Georgiadis revamped the executive ranks and recruited Kreiz to the board, calling him a “disruptive thinker” who would help transform intellectual property to create new content and experiences. She also discontinued lackluster toy lines, expanded gaming, enacted a $650 million cost-cutting plan and tried to speed up product cycles that often last a year or longer. But results worsened, and she took to calling 2017 a “reset” year. She left last week for another job. In February, Mattel named Kreiz chairman, effective at the shareholders meeting in May. Just after the announcement, he attended the toy fair in New York to see the company’s latest offerings and get a better sense of its challenges. Content Machines One hurdle for Mattel has been that its strategy on entertainment has been a step slower than Hasbro and Lego. While competitors were morphing into content machines, producing movies, television shows and online video, Mattel, in just one example, spent years trying to get a Barbie feature film made. If Hasbro can transform dormant brands like Transformers and My Little Pony into thriving entertainment franchises, why couldn’t Mattel do the same? Kreiz, an Israeli who’s been described in press accounts as a driven workout junkie, made his first mark in the mid 1990s, just a few years out of business school. Haim Saban, a children’s TV producer known for “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers,” hired him to start Fox Kids Europe from scratch. Within a couple years, the channel was available in 28 countries and had a $1 billion valuation. Coincidentally, Brian Goldner, the Hasbro CEO, also got his start with Saban, adopting for Hasbro the Power Rangers template of first creating entertainment and then selling the toys to kids who watch. Next, Kreiz revamped Endemol, a European producer of reality TV shows like “Big Brother.” He later took the reins at Maker Studios, a digital-video publishing network, after, as was the case with Mattel, starting as a board member. The company was a pioneer in user-generated content on platforms like YouTube, and was acquired in 2014 by Walt Disney Co. for $675 million. “He has precisely the background you’d want,” said Johnson of BMO Capital Markets. “If you’re going to find someone who doesn’t have any toy experience, his resume is probably one of the best resumes you could find.”