Men's College Basketball

25 May 19
The Denver Post
Where Larry Scott goes, Phil DiStefano follows. Or vice versa, if the reports over the past few months are on the level. When the Pac-12 rearranges the deck chairs, as it did this past week with new men’s basketball scheduling rules and other mandates, it does so now with the blessing of DiStefano, Colorado’s chancellor who became chair of the Pac-12’s CEO group last year. Given the tumult that’s shaken the Pac-12 since the autumn— from jaw-dropping reports on Scott’s spending habits to a league administrator overruling an officiating call in a critical football game — The Post met with DiStefano recently to get his thoughts on a number of topics, most notably: Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott’s job performance “It’s been a rough time, you know. And he still has two, three more years on his contract (which was extended through 2022). As I’ve said, we’ll certainly take a (look) at that. “Right now, the focus is with the Raine Group and our media rights, and what are some possibilities (there). Because I think we ought to be in a position in 2023 and 2024 when our contracts with ESPN and FOX run out, to be able to make the best deals possible. “(He’s) very open to (more administrator involvement). He’s been very open to it. And again, it’s really getting Larry as a commissioner getting direction from the chancellors and presidents and I use the term — things have evolved in the Pac-12. And Larry’s been very open to looking at different ways of doing things. So I think it’s been very positive.” Where the Pac-12 Network went wrong “It’s hard to say. One is, five or six years ago, should we have sold a piece of the network? It probably would’ve been to an ESPN or a FOX at that time. Should we have done that? Maybe. Maybe not. “But I look at where we are now, and given what has happened in the media in the last five to seven years, are we in a better position owning 100 percent of the network, so that we can really go out and look at creative options which, if we had made a (partnered) deal earlier, we might not have been able to do? I wish I had the answer.” Closing the revenue gap on the Big Ten, SEC and Big 12 “It goes back to filling our stadiums. There are media rights (issues), but then what can we do as campuses? And how can we be much more entrepreneurial in making sure that (they generate revenue)? “Obviously, if we’re winning, we’re going to get more people in the stadium — that’s going to produce more revenue. And there are other things we can do. For example, it’s not a bake sale, but we have summer concerts now in Folsom (Field) with the Grateful Dead (Dead & Company); I think they’re coming back for the third year or fourth year. “And our facilities are (unique) there as far as opening them up to the public for wedding receptions, and other gatherings to get people on to campus. Obviously, each individual campus has to look at ways of increasing revenue. But as a conference, really, the revenue that comes in is from three sources: Our media deal; the NCAA basketball March Madness — and again, getting more teams in will help on that — and football and the College Football Playoff. So it’s those combinations.” A Pac-12 executive overturning a call in last fall’s Washington State-USC game “Well, I think the officiating has been an issue for the ADs for the last year — the last couple of years. “(The call in the Wazzu-USC game) concerned us all, of having a staff member changing a call. But again, I think (when) issues come up, we look at them directly, figure out a way of fixing them and move on. And I think that’s what this external (officiating) consultant will help us with.” Expectations for new CU football coach Mel Tucker: “I think Mel said this when he visited and saw the facilities that we have, and where we live in Colorado, and he said, ‘I can recruit,’ and ‘I can recruit the best players (to come) here.’ And he’s obviously been at Georgia, Alabama, Ohio State. “So he believes we can win championships. And so it’s all about recruiting. And he has the same values that (athletic director) Rick (George) and I have about bringing in young men with character who can be successful both in the classroom but also on the field. And he really talks about our football players as student-athletes. And Rick (stresses) this as well: Getting degrees, but competing. And I don’t think, if you do one, you can’t do the other, right? You can do them both.” Initial impressions of Mel Tucker “I called him the day he accepted the position and he said, ‘What do I call you?’ I said, ‘You can call me Phil, and I’ll call you Mel, how does that sound?’ And he said, ‘Great.’ “We have these ties — we’re both from Ohio. He’s worked under some of the best coaches in the country, both college and pro. And what I’ve been most impressed with is his willingness to go out and meet with alumni, friends of the university. In February, he and Rick and I did a trip to California, where of course we have many alumni in Southern California. And Mel was just great interacting with our alums and donors, parents, friends of the university. He’s very easy-going to talk with, has never said, ‘No.’ “We had a lunch at the Bel Air Country Club, one of our alums hosted us, and we had about 45-50 alums at the luncheon. And every one of them said, ‘Wow, he is so engaging.’ And they kept asking him questions and he stayed and wanted to know about them just as much as they wanted to know about him. And that shows how engaging he is with our alums. The feedback that I’m getting is extremely positive.” Fixing Pac-12 football, men’s basketball “(Slumps) are cyclical. Those are obviously the two sports that we talk about: men’s basketball and football. And I look at the coaches now around the Pac-12, including our new coach. And it’s not going to happen immediately. Washington has had the same coach (Chris Petersen) for a while. But you start looking at some of the new coaches coming in, including ours, and I do think you’re going to see it is cyclical. “And with basketball, you know (the Buffs) had one senior this year that didn’t play. And we get our 7-footer back next year with Dallas (Walton) and we were one or two games away, in my mind, from being in the NCAA Tournament. And we showed up in the NIT. So I think there are other basketball teams doing the same thing — Oregon, for example. No one expected Oregon to do what it did in the NCAA Tournament. “Everyone wants to win. And it’s about recruiting, and it’s about bringing in the best talent that can be successful. And I do believe it’s cyclical. And I do think we’ll see a change.”
25 May 19
USA TODAY Sports Brackets

If you were to write a song about the SEC spring meetings, you could call it “Booze, Gambling & Transfers.” Those topics will be on the menu again this year when the four-day conference meetings begin Tuesday, with athletics directors, coaches and university brass gathering at Hilton Sandestin Beach in Destin, Fla. Here are four […]

25 May 19
Auntie Rona's Trans Blog

The LGBTQ Center – Facebook Today’s Profound Thoughts and Items of Interest Michiana Daily News Update Trans News Updates Weather: Today’s High 78 Low 62 partly cloudy/t-storms with a 51% chance of rain. Local News Breaking News Headline Google News Drudge Report ABC News CBS News CNN Fox News NBC News MSN Jayme Closs’ kidnapper sentenced to […]

25 May 19
L & L Beacon

Lapaz North Township Fire Department – Home | Facebook Town of Lapaz Indiana | Facebook Town of Lakeville Laville Jr Sr High School | Facebook Activities The Newton Center Lakeville, Indiana Michiana Daily News Update Weather: Today’s High 78 Low 62 partly cloudy/t-storms with a 51% chance of rain. Local News Breaking News Headline Google News Drudge […]

25 May 19
Daily Republic

May 25– May 25–OLD LYME — Bella Arias scored six goals and Lydia Tinnerello had four goals and six assists as the 12th-seeded Old Lyme High School girls’ lacrosse team beat No. 21 Berlin 18-3 in the qualifying round of the CIAC Class S tournament Friday afternoon. Old Lyme (11-7) plays Shoreline Conference tournament champion […]

24 May 19
USA TODAY High School Sports

Penny Hardaway thinks Memphis men’s basketball is ready to compete with its class headlined by Chosen 25 players James Wiseman, Precious Achiuwa and Boogie Ellis.

24 May 19
Daily Republic

Saturday’s TV sports Baseball College •Big Ten Tournament, semifinals, BIG TEN, 7 a.m. •Big South Tournament, championship, ESPNU, 9 a.m. •SEC Tournament, semifinals, SEC, 10 a.m. •Big Ten Tournament, semifinals, BIG TEN, 11 a.m. •Teams TBA, Pac-12, noon •SEC Tournament, semifinals, SEC, 1:30 p.m. •Big Ten Tournament, semifinals, BIG TEN, 3 p.m., if necessary •UCLA at […]

24 May 19
Daily Republic

Editor’s note: To have an announcement run in Signups, send information to sports@dailyrepublic.net. FAIRFIELD INDIANS SUMMER COLLEGIATE BASEBALL PLAYER SEARCH — The Fairfield Indians are looking for players for their 2019 summer season. Prospective players must be between 18 and 24 and have high school and/or college experience. Graduating high school seniors and current college […]

24 May 19
Flagrant

“Flagrant” is a strong word, reserved for the harshest and most violent penalties in the game of basketball. But it’s an appropriate adjective to describe the fouls committed against NCAA athletes today. My name is Katie Lever and I am a former Division 1 athlete and a current Ph. D student at the University of […]

24 May 19
Luke's Blog

            This week we will be discussing Contingency Leadership, which I find to be a popular theory because it’s a lot like businesses today. I am a believer that for a business to be successful it must be willing to adapt to the market, customer and economy. This is very similar to contingency leadership because […]

24 May 19
VOICE OF THE HWY

CLOSE A look back at the history of Juwan Howard, the former Michigan basketball star, on the national stage. Wochit, Wochit Juwan Howard has made his first personnel decision as head coach of Michigan basketball. Howard, who was hired as the Wolverines’ head coach on Wednesday, announced in a tweet on Friday that longtime strength-and-conditioning coach […]

24 May 19
BuffZone
The University of Colorado and its athletic department have made the health and well being of their students and student-athletes a higher priority than ever before. In particular, there has been an increased focus on mental health recently. CU is now hoping to learn more about its alumni, and how that knowledge can benefit current and future Buffaloes. Funded by a two-year, $200,000 grant from the Pac-12 Conference, the CU Boulder research faculty and the athletic department are beginning a study of 2,000 alumni who have graduated from the school in the past 25 years. “There is a group of us that have been talking about this for a while,” said Theresa Hernandez, a professor of psychology and neuroscience and associate dean for research at the College of Arts and Sciences, who will lead the study. “Really thinking about, we have a good idea of how we’re doing for student-athletes here, but how are we – or how have we been doing – for our alums? We thought it would be good to do that, to ask them.” Among the group who came up with the study is Hernandez; Miguel Rueda, who is a senior associate athletic director and leader of the department’s health and wellness programs; Dr. Sourav Poddar, the director of primary care sports medicine; and associate professors of integrative physiology Williams Byrnes and Matthew McQueen. The group is aiming to study 1,000 former student-athletes and 1,000 alums who were not athletes at CU. Miguel Rueda Athletes from six different sports will be targeted for the study – two contact sports (football and women’s soccer), two mid-range contact sports (men’s and women’s basketball) and two non-contact sports (men’s and women’s cross country) – allowing researchers to see the impact of contact or non-contact sports. “It’s a constant quest of, are we doing good enough?” Rueda said. “Are we doing enough for our student-athletes and are we getting the right information?” CU athletics and the campus have collected more information about current students and student-athletes as it strives to meet their health and wellness needs. This new study could enhance that even more. “Maybe this information we get back from our study will help us say, ‘Hey, we’re missing something. Let’s add it to what we’re doing now,’” Rueda said. The study, which will include graduates from two, five, 10, 15, 20 and 25 years ago, will include a set of questions that will take about an hour to complete, Hernandez said. “It will get at physical health, psychological health, any diagnoses they have, history of concussion, access to medical care, income – all the things that let us know their perception of how they’re doing,” Hernandez said. “This is one of those studies that, whichever way the results come out, it’s going to be interesting and important.” While other studies have been done, this one as it is constructed is unique, and the group is hoping the information will be beneficial not only to CU, but to other schools in the Pac-12 and around the country. “The idea is that it doesn’t occur in a vacuum,” Hernandez said. “We do it at CU first, but if we do it well, the Pac-12 might say, ‘We want you to take this model’ – if we’ve created a good model – ‘that then we’re going to pilot four other schools to do it in the next year.’” Funding came through the Pac-12 Student-Athlete Health and Well-being Initiative, a landmark initiative which was created in 2014. Through that initiative, the Pac-12 provides $3.6 million per year for schools to use to fund research projects. Earlier this week, the Pac-12 announced a five-year extension of that initiative. At CU, Rueda said there has been a significant improvement in recent years with the cooperation between campus and athletics to work Theresa Hernandez together on these issues. “Between (athletic director Rick George) and chancellor (Philip DiStefano), everybody wants to address the issues of overall health and particularly mental health, as well,” Rueda said. “We’ve done some pretty fun collaboration with campus.” For this study, the first step is identifying the 2,000 alums. That’s a process that will take time, but Rueda said many people are already reaching out to CU and wanting to get involved. To learn more about the study or to express interest in being notified when recruitment for the study begins, see CU’s website at http://www.colorado.edu/research/buffs-health-alumni-study/. Hernandez said it will take a collaborative effort to find the 2,000 eligible alums and said it will take several months to do that. “It’s really about partnering with the community and campus entities who can help us determine who is eligible,” she said. Once the group has its list of alums, it will collect data that it hopes will help to improve the health and well-being of its current and future Buffs. It’s another positive step in an area that CU has made a priority. “There’s a handful of places that probably invest similarly to what we invest in health and well-being of the student-athletes,” Rueda said. “I really believe we’re doing it the best, from the top down – just a true focus on trying to do what’s right.”
24 May 19
4:38 Tee Time

Most of us play golf casually with our friends as a way to sneak out of work in the afternoon when we’re trying to make our 4:38 tee time (see what I did there?) or as a relaxing way to spend a Saturday or Sunday when the weather gets nice. We head out, full of […]

24 May 19
Augusta Free Press

UVA director of athletics Carla Williams has announced the appointment of Brittney Whiteside as executive associate athletics director.

24 May 19
THE CAROLINIAN

Andrew SalmonSports Editor It’s the last issue of the semester. Normally, there’s a farewell piece from the editor (me) or a writer who’s graduating, but there isn’t a single senior on the sports staff. Instead, we’ll acknowledge a few graduating seniors who went above and beyond for this University and this community. We’re all thinking […]