Metro

20 Mar 19
HEC Design

Arriving in Dehli Our first taste of India Delhi is a whirlwind of contradictions. From the hi-tech, air-conditioned Airport, through the safety of business class Metro we arrived right in the heart of the Paharganj, where people, animals, vehicles, pollution, rubbish, rubble, vendors, wallahs, locals and tourists mix into an intense yet unforgettable melee. One […]

20 Mar 19
metro tulsare

Emphasizing Danny's words “Nothing in particular to fix”, British Digital Marketing News confirmed: “Broad core updates have not targeted anything. Provide it by Social Media Top Secrets

20 Mar 19
Drive Fly Seek

Destination: Lisbon, Portugal (part of the EU) Date: Sunday, March 3rd to Wednesday, March 6th Travel / Tour Time: 48 hours Overall Kid Crankiness: kid-less journey  Surprising pro in Lisbon: cheap Uber rides Portugal had never been on my top ten list of places to visit.  However, the friends I traveled with this past March […]

20 Mar 19
Metro
(Picture: Supplied) Kids want to be superheroes – but this baby thought he was one the minute he was born. Little Harry was born via caesarean section at 40 weeks and four days because he was a large baby. The picture was taken by his dad the moment he was born and shows him with his fist in the air, like a Superman. It was the first time his mum Bree Summers, from New South Wales, Australia, saw her son. Harry is now seven but Bree shared the picture with her friend and doula Jade Jevaratnam, who runs the Instagram account Hello World Birth. She posted a series of pictures of babies born by c-section as part of Caesarean Awareness Month. Described as a ‘little superman entrance’, Bree explained: ‘Harry was welcomed into the world at 40weeks + 4day. ‘Planned cesarean due to position and size of bub. Weighing in 9lbs even and 50cms. ‘The c-section was very calm and relaxed, I was lifted up so I was able to see Harry being pulled out.’ The family now (Picture: Supplied) Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, Bree said: ‘I never showed anyone the photo or thought much of it. ‘But when my friend asked if I had any photos of my boys’ deliveries for C-section awareness and then she published it on Instagram, I had people reaching out to me in support of the picture. She added she is keen to ’empower other women in their birth journey’. ‘I’m proud my photo could be helping other women,’ she said. Jade added the picture had gone further than she could have imagined. Bree and Harry (Picture: Supplied) She said: ‘A year or so ago, I started out asking friends and clients if they would be willing to share their birth story with an image on my social pages, with the hope that it could empower and inspire women and mums, to share and see the excitement, joy, pain and reality of birth in all its ways. ‘This photo I posted in particular has been shared numerous times since. [metro-zone-post-strip] ‘It’s WELL beyond anywhere I could have ever taken it, and it’s pretty cool, cos it just started with an idea, a brave mum, sharing her story and this photo with me and it’s now reaching thousands. ‘Thankful for all the stories I’ve been apart of, heard, been able to share to date and hope for many more.’ [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/baby-spina-bifida-operation-still-inside-womb-8953149/” title=”Baby with spina bifida had an operation while he was still inside the womb”] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/celebrate-festival-colours-holi-events-around-city-8953602/” title=”Celebrate the festival of colours at Holi events around the city”]
20 Mar 19
Metro
The toybox is full for another instalment (Picture: Disney) A new Toy Story trailer has been released, with the fourth instalment proving to be just as much as a rollercoaster ride as the previous three. As well as the usual suspects – like Woody, Buzz, and Jessie – there are also going to plenty of new characters; one of whom will be voiced by Keanu Reeves. The John Wick star has been rumoured to be part of the franchise for some time, but only now do we know which of the toys he’ll be putting his dulcet tones to. His character – Duke Caboom – is in the trailer right at the end, and is a daredevil motorcycle riding stuntman action figure. Caboom storms in at the end of the trailer (Picture: Disney) As for what Duke will be doing in the film, it’s still mostly under wraps. We do know, however, that he’ll bear a fair similarity to Buzz himself. When appearing on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon at the end of last year, Tim Allen who plays Buzz Lightyear gave an insight into the character. He said: ‘Here’s a little inside story, Keanu Reeves, the lovely man that he is, said, “this sounds too much like Buzz Lightyear,” and the character does have a slight edge of that.’ The 65-year-old added: ‘So, we calmed him down a little bit.’ Reeves described the ‘really cool’ moment he got the call from Pixar with Collider. He said: ‘I got a call which was really cool, out of the blue from the lovely people at Pixar and the creators of this continuation of the story. ‘They pitched the character to me and we spoke and they allowed me to, kind of, riff on it and I’ve done four recording sessions with them so far and it’s been a lot of fun.’ [metro-video id=”1886146″] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/derry-girls-fans-notice-gang-wearing-rainbow-pins-support-clare-coming-8955510/” title=”Derry Girls fans notice the gang have been wearing rainbow pins to support Clare after coming out”] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/what-happens-on-tour-taylor-swifts-cheeky-comment-during-fans-surprise-backstage-proposal-revealed-8952123/” title=”What Happens On Tour: Taylor Swift’s cheeky comment during fan’s surprise backstage proposal revealed”]
20 Mar 19
Metro
Harry Redknapp is all for Emily Atack’s new role as he backs Anne Hegerty’s sassy trolling The I’m A Celeb crew has one another’s backs, as Harry Redknapp continued to prove this week. After Anne Hegerty expertly clapped back at one horrible troll targeting fellow camper Emily Atack last week, Harry has also stood in her corner. Emily had previously shared exciting news on Twitter that she’ll be playing the legendary singer Debbie Harry in an upcoming new season of Urban Myths on Sky Arts. Keyboard warrior Steve wasn’t best pleased, however, and took a nasty swipe at the actress’s appearance, writing: ‘Sorry, you’re just not pretty enough.’ Then came in The Chase’s Anne who wasn’t having any of it and quickly leapt to her pal’s defence as she quipped: ‘What a sad c**t you are, Steve.’ Anne Hegerty is irreplaceable on The Chase – and there’s proof (Picture: ITV) The winner of I’m A Celeb and their comrade Harry this week backed Anne’s defense of Emily all the way. ‘Anne was lovely and Emily is very, very talented and can certainly play Debbie Harry,’ he told Metro.co.uk. ‘She’s a beautiful girl as well. It’s doesn’t surprise me and she’ll be amazing. ‘I look forward to seeing it! It’s the first I’ve heard of it. She will be amazing. She can sing, she’s a very talented girl and she looks fantastic.’ When it comes to social media, it’s no secret trolls lurk within and are prepared to take anyone down, no matter the consequence. Just over the weekend we saw the tragic death of Love Island’s Mike Thalassitis, who died by suicide aged 26. Harry’s show was praised (Picture: ITV) Many have come to call for better aftercare of reality shows who are thrust into the spotlight and faced with the harrowing downsides of social media, which soon becomes part of their job. Following praise of Harry’s show, Harry’s Heroes, for how it tackles mental health, he told us he felt lucky he never had to deal with social media at the height of his career and refuses to this day to read anything about himself for the sake of his own sanity. ‘I’ve been very lucky I’ve had my wife [Sandra], she’s really positive so she’s always been there if I’ve ever felt low,’ he said. ‘You do get low in football if things aren’t going well; it can be a very lonely experience as a player or manager. ‘You do need help and you need someone to talk to in times like that.’ He added in terms of what might be said about him: ‘I don’t want to know – what you don’t know don’t hurt you. ‘If you don’t want to see someone slagging you off, don’t go on social media, don’t read it. If you don’t want to see bad news, don’t buy the papers. Don’t bother reading the newspaper.’ The former Chelsea manager admits he’s ‘busier than ever’ after leaving the jungle, despite feeling like at 72-year-old he ‘should be putting his feet up’. ‘Sandra said to me, “we’ll have a quiet life, nice holidays”, then suddenly here we go, busier than ever,’ he said about his latest endeavour. ‘Poor Sandra’s in the kitchen all day and all night making roly polys…’ [metro-video id=”1887072″ video=”https://videos.metro.co.uk/video/met/2019/03/20/7103002562846702691/480x270_MP4_7103002562846702691.mp4” image=”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/03/20/14/11232984-0-image-m-20_1553093943244.jpg“] He’s teamed up with GoDaddy to launch Harry’s Roly Polys  this week, so we can share in his love of the jam pudding from the man himself. Still, if you think this is the chance for long-suffering wife Sandra – who he married in 1967 – to take in the culinary delights her husband has been slaving away in the kitchen over, she’s got no chance of being treated. ‘Sandra’s been in the kitchen making them! I gave her a two-hour rest,’ he laughed, as we nervously joined in. ‘She’s got to do it, we need the money.’ They definitely don’t need the money, but moving on… [metro-tag-post-strip] ‘I couldn’t make a bacon sandwich, but I am doing my little bit in the kitchen,’ he continued. ‘I know the taste and how it should taste so I leave it to other people. But I have the final say by tasting them.’ We can only bet they’re ‘triffic‘. [metro-fact-box id=”7022752″ title=”Got a showbiz story?” icon=”exclamation” /] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/harry-redknapp-still-loves-son-jamies-ex-wife-louise-sad-went-wrong-8954146/” title=”Harry Redknapp ‘still loves’ son Jamie’s ex-wife Louise: ‘I was sad when it all went wrong’”] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/01/17/im-celebs-malique-thompson-dwyer-officially-dating-harry-redknapps-granddaughter-molly-cute-together-8354030/” title=”I’m A Celeb’s Malique Thompson-Dwyer ‘officially’ dating Harry Redknapp’s granddaughter Molly: ‘They’re cute together’”]
20 Mar 19
Metro
Rob’s son Henry died last January (Picture: Rob Delaney/Twitter) Rob Delaney has said he’s a ‘mess’ 14 months after the death of his son Henry. Henry was just two when he died last January after battling cancer, with Rob breaking the devastating news a month later on Facebook. While Rob, 42, has spoken out about Henry’s passing and his experience with the NHS over the past year, he has been his most brutally honest yet in an interview with the Evening Standard. The Catastrophe star said: ‘I’m a mess. My child died 14 months ago and I’m basically a bag of wet rubbish. I need a lot of help. ‘It has been very hard. It comes in waves. I’ve learned to not control how the waves come. Right now I’m sad a lot.’ Rob and his family were helped by the Rainbow Trust (Picture: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images) He added that he was speaking about his feelings so that someone else coping with a bereavement doesn’t ‘feel like some a**hole from TV has it all together’. Delaney was speaking at the Rainbow Trust’s annual fundraiser Trust In Fashion, with the charity, which supports the families of seriously ill children, helping Rob, his wife Leah and their other two sons (they have gone on to welcome another boy) through Henry’s illness. Explaining that they were connected with the Rainbow Trust at the end of a seven-month stint at Great Ormond Street Hospital, Rob said: ‘The care worker assigned to us was a woman named Fiona who was just amazing, and remains so. She still comes and visits us sometimes. ‘At that point we didn’t know Henry was going to die. We knew he was disabled by his tumour and his surgery. Fiona was like a paratrooper who just drops in and has the skill set to help people in unbelievable pain and fear.’ [metro-tag-post-strip] Henry passed away a year and a half after he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. He had surgery to remove the tumour, which left him with significant physical difficulties. However, Henry learned to communicate via sign language, with Rob choosing to read a CBeebies Bedtime Story through Makaton. Rob returned to television this year for the finale of Catastrophe, with his and Sharon Horgan’s characters ending the fourth series in uncertain circumstances – as the couple swim in very dangerous territory, and we don’t see them return to shore. The finale received rave reviews, after four critically acclaimed series. You can get more information about the Rainbow Trust on their website. [metro-fact-box id=”6306324″ title=”Need support? Contact the Samaritans” icon=”exclamation” /] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/derry-girls-fans-notice-gang-wearing-rainbow-pins-support-clare-coming-8955510/” title=”Derry Girls fans notice the gang have been wearing rainbow pins to support Clare after coming out”] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/jade-goodys-bridesmaids-reflect-stars-devastating-wedding-day-10-years-death-8955071/” title=”Jade Goody’s bridesmaids reflect on star’s ‘devastating’ wedding day 10 years after her death”]  
20 Mar 19
Popula
Like every other communist visiting Mexico City for the first time, I set out from my hostel to visit the homes of Frida Kahlo and Leon Trotsky, who had lived in the same neighborhood. I walked down to the Metro Zócalo and, as commuters streamed around me, peered at the large-format map, apprehensive because Mexico City is vast, I did not at the time speak or read any Spanish, and it appeared I would need to change trains and then change trains again in a language I had neglected to learn if I was to reach Coyoacán. This will never work, I thought, already exhausted by my own failure. I was there in 12 minutes. There is much to say about the houses of Frida and Leon—who apparently had an affair though I am not sure that is the right word as I believe that Frida and Diego Rivera were, you know, open-minded, and possibly Leon and Natalia Sedova as well, and that seems like one of the good things about being a revolutionary—but I will perhaps save that for another occasion. The main thing I recall from that day is the effectiveness of the metro system and the elegance of the map, more complex than Boston, more ambitious than the Bay Area, and more apprehensible than New York City, the three systems on which and in which I grew up. A subway map is first of all a matter of utility, designed along with the system it represents to make the city manageable, the city which once seemed alien and hostile to organic life, the city which must have seemed during the advent of metro systems in the 19th and early 20th centuries as daunting and incomprehensible to most everybody as Mexico City did to me. The problem with early subway maps was, oddly, that they were too accurate, tracking each bend and swoop imposed by obstacle and engineering, making it difficult to understand the relationship between various parts. That is, they were more interested in the representational accuracy of any given point than in understanding the whole thing as a unified system. About a third of the way through the 20th century the subway map went through its Copernican shift “from map to diagram” as they say. Designers broadly adopted the rule that all lines would be straight, turns would be in 45° increments with a little smoothing of sharp corners, and this is still more or less where we are today. This advance in clarity allowed for much smaller maps, the kind you could carry in your pocket, even in your wallet. It also had the dramatic effect of detaching the map from the terrestrial surface, sacrificing for the most part the idea that the map itself would orient a traveler once they left the station. It proved easy enough to post neighborhood maps in each station for those emerging. Henceforth the city and the metro would be independent systems. The idea that the city is inorganic or unnatural has its basis in the attachment of agrarian life to the seasons, to “nature,” while the city—or at least, the domination of the city over the countryside—is an artifact of the shift to industry, to great machines gathered in the great forcing houses of labor. Still, it always struck me as wrong. Humans did the great cities, and the less great ones, and humans are organic af. In some sense cities are the achieved form for organizing the social existence of the human organism. At the same time, the experience of alienation, of having no attachment to what you make or to what makes you, is pretty much what we mean when we say the city is cold. And sometimes the city is cold. But it’s also complicated and that is a different matter, even if it sometimes seems to be the same. A great city, with its innumerable relations, is hard to wrap your head around. Baudelaire thought that the prose poem was the best way to capture this impossibly vast condition, but maybe it is the subway map which, unlike the map of the city above, means to capture it as a system: to show the relation between here and there and not just that but show it in such a way that one can understand that if something goes wrong at this station here, it will have effects on these lines but not those, or more here than there, that each of the points is in a relation with all of the others, that there can be local and structural effects, and so on. A subway map is, I’ll say again, a simplification of a simplification. But that seems OK, my mind is grotesquely limited in its capacities. I cannot hold Mexico City in my head, or New York, or even Oakland, cannot hold the causal webs that reshape each city much less the relations among the cities themselves, their relation to the suburbs and the exurbs and the rural redoubts. . . . Moreover, I am not entirely sure cities are really the system in question. If they rose to dominance with the rise of industry and large-scale manufacture, they declined with same. That is to say, if cities could once stand in for “the economy,” could once provide a kind of map of the world that the economy needed, they have begun to lose that power. The whirring pathways of finance, as we learned clearly enough a decade ago if not before, are far more complexified, mysterious, intentionally opaque. But this system too, the global financial system within which cities are concentrations of power but still no more than nodes, stations in a relay, is also organic, in the same sense that it was brought into being by human activity. Not just any human activity, or human activity “as such,” as the philosophers say: like the industrial world from which it springs, it was brought into being by the bloody imposition of a certain set of property relations and fatal hierarchies that we cheerfully call capitalism, which has in its own organic character a tendency to move away from making useful things toward making profit in the most useless ways imaginable. In short, the complexification of the world has two fundamental characteristics. One, as Fredric Jameson famously noted, it has developed far beyond the capacities of our intellects to grasp it as a coherent whole, a system. Two, this development is inescapably entangled with the misery it produces at both global and local levels. It’s not the complexity that does the immiserating; that’s a confusion of correlation and cause. But one is inseparable from the other, as they share a source. The proletariat cannot simply lay hold of the complexity and wield it for its own purposes. In a situation so complicated and so terrible, it is understandable that we would go down to the underworld in search of some explanation. Epics have done it since Homer, and by the time of Alice Notley’s brilliant feminist reimagining The Descent of Alette, it was clear that the underworld was the subway. There’s a joke in that: the subway is hell, especially the C train. But there are other reasons to consult the subway for understanding, and to consult their maps, not just the one for where you are but any subway map, all the maps. Part of it is the simple pleasure of imagining other places, the elegance of the St. Petersburg map with its subtle curves flaunting the 45° rule, the world-making intensity of Tokyo, and so on. But I think as well that the subway map is a visualization of the sensation one necessarily has in a subway station if one is not too blotto from work or other miseries, the sensation one has peering across at the opposite platform at the people in that mirror world, peering down the tunnel for the light of a train and seeing instead the dim glow of the next station, seeing in this the truth that you are connected to every other station, every person, subject to the same forces personal and impersonal, that what happens to them happens as good to you, seeing above all that we are denizens of a system that can never be seen in whole but can nonetheless be conceptualized, modeled, can be understood as having a unity, as having effects that are caused not by someone on your platform or someone on another platform or even by someone in a control room somewhere but by the structure in all its terrible unity, by the way it has been developed, and that if we want to transform it on the grounds that there is too much misery, an obvious fact, then we will have to grasp the system as system and unmake it entirely, no cosmetic fixes, no making our platform more equitable at the expense of others, and anyone who thinks the system should be preserved, well, they’re in our way. Popula is 100% ad-free, reader-supported journalism accountable only to you. Every dollar of your subscription goes straight to our work. Thank you for supporting Popula. Joshua Clover
20 Mar 19
soul of serenity

Austria will always have a near and dear place in my heart. It was my first weekend trip during my study abroad semester. I even invited a girl to come with me for the weekend that I just met a week before at a hike with my study abroad program! We had a great time […]

20 Mar 19
Metro
(Picture: Tim Stubbings Photography for Metro.co.uk) Stephen Gillatt, 40, lives with a phobia of using mirrors. The debilitating fear started four years ago, around the same time he had a mental breakdown. It’s not essentially the mirror that he’s afraid of – it’s his own reflection. Stephen will go months without peering in a mirror, because he cannot bear to look at his face. This doesn’t just affect him when he’s getting ready in the morning. If Stephen goes to get his hair cut he will keep his eyes shut throughout. Walking past large windows when shopping is a nightmare, as all large reflective surfaces make him feel uncomfortable. (Picture: Tim Stubbings Photography for Metro.co.uk) Stephen tells Metro.co.uk: ‘I rarely use a mirror to do my hair. It’s short, so I just leave it how it is, or put some wax on my hands and just rub them all over my head. That’s it. ‘I rarely know what I look like when I go out. I just get dressed and ask my wife, or my eldest daughter – they’re both honest with me! ‘Not using them doesn’t directly affect me; but using them does. It’s actually easier when I don’t use them. So, unless I absolutely have to, I won’t. ‘I envy people who can just use mirrors for aesthetic purposes – to just see how they look, and if they like it. Or want to change it. ‘When I look in a mirror, I see an unsuccessful, emotionally ugly person. I don’t see my physical features, I just look straight through them. ‘I see my failures as a son, husband, father, brother and friend. My inadequacies. How I’ve hurt people, how I’ve let them down. And how much I loathe and hate myself for doing all this. (Picture: Tim Stubbings Photography for Metro.co.uk) ‘It also has links to death anxiety too.’ Stephen says that looking in mirrors makes him panic about his mortality. It’s a reminder that he won’t always be able to look into a mirror and see himself – that he’ll eventually be gone. ‘Eventually it’ll be just darkness and oblivion’, he said. ‘It triggers lots of things in my head. I have a lot of invasive, uncontrollable thoughts, and when I look into a mirror, they are triggered.’ Stephen also hates having his photos taken, as he hates seeing himself on camera. He adds: ‘I wish I could just look in a mirror and think “My hair looks ridiculous, I’ll change it!”‘ Stephen is currently not receiving any help for his phobia. He was in therapy for a couple of years and talked about it during some sessions, but he still lives with his phobia intensely. He said: ‘The problem comes from deeply embedded feeling of low self-worth and self-esteem. And to an extent self-loathing as well. ‘I’ve formed these feelings and views of myself over decades. So, it might take that long for me to truly displace them. And to be honest, living without mirrors isn’t that bad once you get used to it! ‘I’ve had so many challenges – self harm and suicide, addictions, problems with sleep, eating and body image to mention a few. So, I’ve not really talked about it. (Picture: Tim Stubbings Photography for Metro.co.uk) ‘I’ve written a memoir about fatherhood and mental health called Mad, Sad, Dysfunctional Dad which will be published, I hope, at the end of April or early May and I talk about it a lot in there. ‘It shows in more detail how my daily routine and emotions can be affected my both using, and not using mirrors. And how debilitating it can be. ‘I’ve not met anyone who lives with this phobia and could not find anything on the internet in terms of number of people in the UK living with it. [metro-tag-post-strip] ‘I feel it’s met with maybe not disbelief, but a difficulty to empathise. ‘It’s very complex and I can how why people might find it difficult to get their head around, so to speak. ‘The more concerning aspect is the stigma that still exits around mental health and mental illness. ‘I think people are still scared of it, and a lot of this is down to a lack of understanding, misinformation and the way it is portrayed and sensationalised in the media, especially films and news coverage.’ Stephen see a way of battling his phobia, especially because he’s become so used to never using mirrors. He said: ‘I’m not sure I’ll ever use mirrors on a daily basis again. But it’s like anything, you learn to live without something, and the more you do, the easier things become.’ [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/20/is-toxic-positivity-ruining-your-mental-health-8943433/” title=”Is toxic positivity ruining your mental health?”] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/14/working-class-black-men-forgotten-conversation-mental-health-8900583/” title=”Working class, black men are being forgotten in the conversation about mental health”]
20 Mar 19
Jay B The Master

THE RAPPER TALKS TO MTV NEWS ABOUT CREATING ‘DRIP OR DROWN 2’ AND WHAT’S NEXTTREY ALSTON1h ago Gunna scored his first No. 1 on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart earlier this month with his new album, Drip or Drown 2. His previous peak was No. 2 for Drip Harder, his 2018 collaboration with Lil Baby. Before that? Drip Season at No. 25 in February […]

20 Mar 19
Folha Regional Adamantina

A Vigilância Epidemiológica de Adamantina registrou 36 casos positivos de dengue sendo 35 casos autóctones (quando a doença é contraída dentro da cidade) e 01 caso importado. Os bairros que registraram os casos foram: 14 na Vila Jamil de Lima, 12 casos no Jardim Adamantina, dois casos no Centro e um caso importado na Vila […]

20 Mar 19
Metro
Bhavna Limbachia is leaving Corrie – but will she fall victim to the factory collapse? (Picture: ITV) Coronation Street has been pretty dramatic this week in the wake of the factory roof collapse. We know that the incident is set to claim the life of one of the show’s major characters – and there is no list of potential candidates to meet their maker. But one name which keeps coming up as a potential victim is that of Rana Habeeb (Bhavna Limbachia) – even though she was nowhere near the scene at the time the roof caved in. So just why is Rana in the line of fire – and could she be the one to lose her life in the disaster? Here’s what you need to know… Does Rana Habeeb die in Coronation Street? There’s been a whole lot of speculation about how Rana might make her exit from the soap ever since Bhavna Limbacha announced her departure in January. Rumours have been rife that she will die in a heartbreaking storyline on the day of her wedding to Kate Connor (Faye Brookes) – after it was reported that the actress asked for her character to be killed off so she didn’t have to split up with Kate. Could Rana be about to die on her wedding day? (Picture: ITV) Although Rana was not in the factory at the time the roof collapsed, she does have the keys to the factory – which has led to further speculation that if she might somehow find herself there then she’ll be the character who dies. We don’t know any of this for certain of course as it hasn’t been confirmed – and the identity of the victim is being kept very closely under wraps, with other potential candidates including Gina Seddon (Connie Hyde) and Sally Metcalfe (Sally Dynevor). Why is Bhavna Limbachia leaving the soap? The actress – who also starred in BBC One hit Citizen Khan – is leaving to pursue other projects. She broke the news to her fans on Twitter in January, saying: ‘Hi guys I just wanted to give you a little message to say thank you for following Rana’s journey and for the continued support of the storyline. ‘I do have some news – my journey at Coronation Street will be coming to an end but don’t worry guys, I have extended my contract. ‘I’ve had a wonderful time here but there’s still lots more to film and I’m really grateful to Iain, our producer, for respecting my decision to leave and we have collaborated to come up with an amazing exit storyline so thank you so much.’ Despite confirming she was leaving the actress has not specified when she will be departing the cobbles – meaning that the speculation could be just that. So we’ll just have to tune in to see whether the happiest day of Rana’s life is set to end in tragedy. Coronation Street airs weeknights on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 7.30pm.