Mike Mayock

27 May 19
ProFootballTalk

The NFL lost a legend Sunday with the passing of Hall of Fame quarterback Bart Starr. In his Football Morning in America column, Peter King tells the story of Starr’s last interview, which showcased the one trait that made Starr an icon in Green Bay and professional football. Plus:

• Jon Gruden, unplugged, on Oakland’s rookie running back, the team’s crazy 2019 schedule and a Raiders edition of Family Feud.

• The one thing Dick Ebersol will be remembered for as the NBC executive makes his way into Canton.

• The annual tradition of sharing some of the more interesting snippets from this year’s commencement speeches

• More thoughts, notes and opinions on Sammy Watkins’ readiness; Gerald McCoy’s farewell; Adam Jones’ retirement; Nick Bosa’s latest injury.

• Plus 10 things, factoids, beernerdness and the interesting things one sees while traveling on U.S. 30 through Pennsylvania and Ohio.

27 May 19
No Sleep Till Football

PICK TEAM ANALYSIS & GRADE #33 Byron Murphy/CB/Washington: A lot of people had Murphy going in the first round so getting him in the top of the 2nd is great value for the Cardinals & also addresses a need. Murphy is an ultra-instinctive player on the outside. He’s a little slight of build in the […]

27 May 19
Sport Archives

Oakland's draft round chose pick Jacob Jacobs from the University of Alabama, not only was the first one running back from the board in the NFL Draft 2019, but he could be a big-time fantasy stud this season as well . Many fantasy experts are looking at Jacobs' success in 2019 as a very high […]

24 May 19
Bucs Wire

Every year, there’s that post-Super Bowl hangover that sets in for NFL fans, who know it’ll be more than half a year before they see their team play a meaningful game again. But the best cure for that depression is the NFL Scouting Combine, which thankfully comes just weeks after the big game. (Because a […]

24 May 19
Raiders Wire

[jwplayer 8PBlJgqD-ThvAeFxT] The Raiders have a rich history of stretching the field vertically on offense, dating back to the early days of the American Football League when quarterback Daryle “The Mad Bomber” Lamonica would hurl the ball deep in virtually any circumstance. After Lamonica were quarterbacks Ken Stabler and Jim Plunkett, who each led the […]

23 May 19
The Reviewing Network

What a way to wrap up the AFC, let’s talk about the Oakland Raiders and…once again, they did absolutely nothing of noteworthiness in the regular season last season. Only winning 1 of their first 8 games and then winning 3 of their next 7 to finish 4-12. It was just not a good year for […]

23 May 19
Dolphins Wire

[jwplayer 88hwqOq5-ThvAeFxT] When Nate Orchard was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the second round of the 2015 NFL draft, it was with the hope that he would develop into a star pass rusher worthy of the high praise heaped upon him by draft analysts, including Mike Mayock, who is now the general manager for […]

22 May 19
High Velocity Sport

Jets’ GM search: Can they finally get one right? Well … https://es.pn/2Hv2qUh FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — One week after a front-office shake-up that confirmed a chasm in the organization and resulted in ugly fallout and behind-the-scenes finger-pointing from rival factions, the New York Jets will attempt to make themselves whole and rebuild their credibility with […]

22 May 19
News Directory

Territory defense Oakland Raiders Arden KeyD. Ross Cameron / Associated Press Key Partners: t Arden Key, Crosby Maxx, Mayowa Benson, Josh Mauro, Quinton Bell Fans raiders should be tired of number 13 to see, which was the team's sack count last year. General manager Mike Mayock and head coach Jon Gruden attempted to address the […]

22 May 19
The Raider Ramble

There different factors the Oakland Raiders need to consider if they want to trade for Jets defensive lineman Leonard Williams. Raider Ramble breaks down the potential trade.

22 May 19
Sport Archives

Derek Carr is still in the center of Oakland Raiders because the front quarter of the team is now starting in June now on the horizon immediately. The Raiders were continuously linked to overall picking No. 1 in the end and with the current retrospective quarter of Kyler Murray Cardinals Murray – among other things […]

21 May 19
The Reporter
Click here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device. ALAMEDA — The clock starts now. All the ticking that was supposedly going on around draft time regarding the future of Derek Carr with the Raiders was nonsense, speculation devoid of logic and common sense. Carr had adapted and learned coach Jon Gruden’s system of football well enough that there was no thought given to drafting an immediate replacement. Certainly not after a single season, and under a coach who has no track record of entrusting his offense to a rookie. Which didn’t stop a glut of “Carr is on his way out” speculation, with Gruden either becoming infatuated with the idea of Kyler Murray or Dwayne Haskins as the man to lead the Raiders in 2019. Carr has kept quiet on the subject other than taking the bait from ESPN’s stir-it-up host Max Kellerman, half-seriously challenging him to a fight on Twitter in late January. Kellerman was pushing for Murray, and opined of Carr, “You can tell when a quarterback doesn’t want it . . . I think Gruden knows they have to move on.” It was surprising in that Carr gets the media game better than most. He was able to laugh off reports he’d actually cried on the field when taking a beating in London against Seattle and playfully fends off queries about his ability to throw deep. Carr was back in midseason form in his first local availability since the end of the 2018 season when asked how he reacted to all the speculation about his hold on the position. After conversations with Gruden, general manager Mike Mayock and owner Mark Davis, Carr felt he knew what to expect. “When I watched the draft, there was like a negative 47 percent of a chance they were going to draft (a quarterback) in my mind . . . I’m honestly going to be here a long time,” Carr said. “Hope that’s OK with you guys, but you’ve got to get used to me.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. One of the most valuable commodities with a Gruden-run offense is time served. Health permitting, Carr in 2019 will quickly become the quarterback with the second most consecutive regular season starts under Gruden . Rich Gannon is atop the list with 48 from 1999 through 2001, followed by Brad Johnson (20) and Brian Griese (16) in Tampa Bay. Carr had his game stripped down and rebuilt to Gruden’s specifications and has been through 16 starts. Given Carr’s progress, Gruden had no intention of starting over again with someone new — let alone a rookie. A year ago, Carr would go home and stand in front of a mirror practicing play calls, learning the system, and then go on the field hoping to execute it. “I thought then I felt good, like, `Oh yeah, I’ve got this,’ ” Carr said. “Standing here now, I’m like, `Oh, my gosh . . . it’s like I’m on another planet. This is the second time in my career I’m getting to say the same things back-to-back.” Coach Jon Gruden and quarterback Derek Carr talk strategy. Carr not only speaks Gruden’s language (leaving out the profanity), but said he thinks the way Gruden thinks. “When he calls a certain play, I know what he wants me to look for and if it’s not there, get to this,” Carr said. I’m already a step ahead with that. I checked a play today, and he’s just sitting back there laughing. We hadn’t even talked about it yet. We’re on that same page and that’s nice.” Gruden has tired of defending Carr, and it’s easy to see why. Mild critiques of his quarterback are treated in some quarters as scathing indictments, and the remaining 95 percent of generally positive talk is often disregarded. Carr passed for 4,049 yards and also had career highs in completion percentage (68.9) and yards per attempt (7.3) while being sacked 51 times on a bad team. Joe Montana in his prime couldn’t have won with the 2018 Raiders. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“I think he’s pretty well respected as one of the best arm talents in football,” Gruden said. “He’s a lot more athletic than people think. If we can get some continuity here in this building with the system and supporting cast and improve the defense, I think he can be one of the best. I’m going to hold him to that standard and I think that’s what he wants.” Given the improvement in the receiving corps and if the offensive line can protect him, there’s every reason to think Carr can attain a level of respect similar to 2016. He was at the time a Most Valuable Player candidate and earned a contract that brings with it additional scrutiny. Of course, if Carr doesn’t reach that level, there are no guarantees he would be the man to lead the Raiders into Las Vegas in 2020. He fully expects to hear exactly that. “No doubt, right?,” Carr said. “Here we go again. Let’s just get through this year first, then we’ll play that game again. And I’ll probably have some fun with it. I’m not going anywhere. This is my team and it will be for however long I want to play.” It seldom works out that way in a year-to-year business, but 2019 belongs to Carr. It always did. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
21 May 19
Paradise Post
Click here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device. ALAMEDA — The clock starts now. All the ticking that was supposedly going on around draft time regarding the future of Derek Carr with the Raiders was nonsense, speculation devoid of logic and common sense. Carr had adapted and learned coach Jon Gruden’s system of football well enough that there was no thought given to drafting an immediate replacement. Certainly not after a single season, and under a coach who has no track record of entrusting his offense to a rookie. Which didn’t stop a glut of “Carr is on his way out” speculation, with Gruden either becoming infatuated with the idea of Kyler Murray or Dwayne Haskins as the man to lead the Raiders in 2019. Carr has kept quiet on the subject other than taking the bait from ESPN’s stir-it-up host Max Kellerman, half-seriously challenging him to a fight on Twitter in late January. Kellerman was pushing for Murray, and opined of Carr, “You can tell when a quarterback doesn’t want it . . . I think Gruden knows they have to move on.” It was surprising in that Carr gets the media game better than most. He was able to laugh off reports he’d actually cried on the field when taking a beating in London against Seattle and playfully fends off queries about his ability to throw deep. Carr was back in midseason form in his first local availability since the end of the 2018 season when asked how he reacted to all the speculation about his hold on the position. After conversations with Gruden, general manager Mike Mayock and owner Mark Davis, Carr felt he knew what to expect. “When I watched the draft, there was like a negative 47 percent of a chance they were going to draft (a quarterback) in my mind . . . I’m honestly going to be here a long time,” Carr said. “Hope that’s OK with you guys, but you’ve got to get used to me.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. One of the most valuable commodities with a Gruden-run offense is time served. Health permitting, Carr in 2019 will quickly become the quarterback with the second most consecutive regular season starts under Gruden . Rich Gannon is atop the list with 48 from 1999 through 2001, followed by Brad Johnson (20) and Brian Griese (16) in Tampa Bay. Carr had his game stripped down and rebuilt to Gruden’s specifications and has been through 16 starts. Given Carr’s progress, Gruden had no intention of starting over again with someone new — let alone a rookie. A year ago, Carr would go home and stand in front of a mirror practicing play calls, learning the system, and then go on the field hoping to execute it. “I thought then I felt good, like, `Oh yeah, I’ve got this,’ ” Carr said. “Standing here now, I’m like, `Oh, my gosh . . . it’s like I’m on another planet. This is the second time in my career I’m getting to say the same things back-to-back.” Coach Jon Gruden and quarterback Derek Carr talk strategy. Carr not only speaks Gruden’s language (leaving out the profanity), but said he thinks the way Gruden thinks. “When he calls a certain play, I know what he wants me to look for and if it’s not there, get to this,” Carr said. I’m already a step ahead with that. I checked a play today, and he’s just sitting back there laughing. We hadn’t even talked about it yet. We’re on that same page and that’s nice.” Gruden has tired of defending Carr, and it’s easy to see why. Mild critiques of his quarterback are treated in some quarters as scathing indictments, and the remaining 95 percent of generally positive talk is often disregarded. Carr passed for 4,049 yards and also had career highs in completion percentage (68.9) and yards per attempt (7.3) while being sacked 51 times on a bad team. Joe Montana in his prime couldn’t have won with the 2018 Raiders. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“I think he’s pretty well respected as one of the best arm talents in football,” Gruden said. “He’s a lot more athletic than people think. If we can get some continuity here in this building with the system and supporting cast and improve the defense, I think he can be one of the best. I’m going to hold him to that standard and I think that’s what he wants.” Given the improvement in the receiving corps and if the offensive line can protect him, there’s every reason to think Carr can attain a level of respect similar to 2016. He was at the time a Most Valuable Player candidate and earned a contract that brings with it additional scrutiny. Of course, if Carr doesn’t reach that level, there are no guarantees he would be the man to lead the Raiders into Las Vegas in 2020. He fully expects to hear exactly that. “No doubt, right?,” Carr said. “Here we go again. Let’s just get through this year first, then we’ll play that game again. And I’ll probably have some fun with it. I’m not going anywhere. This is my team and it will be for however long I want to play.” It seldom works out that way in a year-to-year business, but 2019 belongs to Carr. It always did. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
21 May 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Click here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device. ALAMEDA — The clock starts now. All the ticking that was supposedly going on around draft time regarding the future of Derek Carr with the Raiders was nonsense, speculation devoid of logic and common sense. Carr had adapted and learned coach Jon Gruden’s system of football well enough that there was no thought given to drafting an immediate replacement. Certainly not after a single season, and under a coach who has no track record of entrusting his offense to a rookie. Which didn’t stop a glut of “Carr is on his way out” speculation, with Gruden either becoming infatuated with the idea of Kyler Murray or Dwayne Haskins as the man to lead the Raiders in 2019. Carr has kept quiet on the subject other than taking the bait from ESPN’s stir-it-up host Max Kellerman, half-seriously challenging him to a fight on Twitter in late January. Kellerman was pushing for Murray, and opined of Carr, “You can tell when a quarterback doesn’t want it . . . I think Gruden knows they have to move on.” It was surprising in that Carr gets the media game better than most. He was able to laugh off reports he’d actually cried on the field when taking a beating in London against Seattle and playfully fends off queries about his ability to throw deep. Carr was back in midseason form in his first local availability since the end of the 2018 season when asked how he reacted to all the speculation about his hold on the position. After conversations with Gruden, general manager Mike Mayock and owner Mark Davis, Carr felt he knew what to expect. “When I watched the draft, there was like a negative 47 percent of a chance they were going to draft (a quarterback) in my mind . . . I’m honestly going to be here a long time,” Carr said. “Hope that’s OK with you guys, but you’ve got to get used to me.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. One of the most valuable commodities with a Gruden-run offense is time served. Health permitting, Carr in 2019 will quickly become the quarterback with the second most consecutive regular season starts under Gruden . Rich Gannon is atop the list with 48 from 1999 through 2001, followed by Brad Johnson (20) and Brian Griese (16) in Tampa Bay. Carr had his game stripped down and rebuilt to Gruden’s specifications and has been through 16 starts. Given Carr’s progress, Gruden had no intention of starting over again with someone new — let alone a rookie. A year ago, Carr would go home and stand in front of a mirror practicing play calls, learning the system, and then go on the field hoping to execute it. “I thought then I felt good, like, `Oh yeah, I’ve got this,’ ” Carr said. “Standing here now, I’m like, `Oh, my gosh . . . it’s like I’m on another planet. This is the second time in my career I’m getting to say the same things back-to-back.” Coach Jon Gruden and quarterback Derek Carr talk strategy. Carr not only speaks Gruden’s language (leaving out the profanity), but said he thinks the way Gruden thinks. “When he calls a certain play, I know what he wants me to look for and if it’s not there, get to this,” Carr said. I’m already a step ahead with that. I checked a play today, and he’s just sitting back there laughing. We hadn’t even talked about it yet. We’re on that same page and that’s nice.” Gruden has tired of defending Carr, and it’s easy to see why. Mild critiques of his quarterback are treated in some quarters as scathing indictments, and the remaining 95 percent of generally positive talk is often disregarded. Carr passed for 4,049 yards and also had career highs in completion percentage (68.9) and yards per attempt (7.3) while being sacked 51 times on a bad team. Joe Montana in his prime couldn’t have won with the 2018 Raiders. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“I think he’s pretty well respected as one of the best arm talents in football,” Gruden said. “He’s a lot more athletic than people think. If we can get some continuity here in this building with the system and supporting cast and improve the defense, I think he can be one of the best. I’m going to hold him to that standard and I think that’s what he wants.” Given the improvement in the receiving corps and if the offensive line can protect him, there’s every reason to think Carr can attain a level of respect similar to 2016. He was at the time a Most Valuable Player candidate and earned a contract that brings with it additional scrutiny. Of course, if Carr doesn’t reach that level, there are no guarantees he would be the man to lead the Raiders into Las Vegas in 2020. He fully expects to hear exactly that. “No doubt, right?,” Carr said. “Here we go again. Let’s just get through this year first, then we’ll play that game again. And I’ll probably have some fun with it. I’m not going anywhere. This is my team and it will be for however long I want to play.” It seldom works out that way in a year-to-year business, but 2019 belongs to Carr. It always did. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
21 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Click here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device. ALAMEDA — The clock starts now. All the ticking that was supposedly going on around draft time regarding the future of Derek Carr with the Raiders was nonsense, speculation devoid of logic and common sense. Carr had adapted and learned coach Jon Gruden’s system of football well enough that there was no thought given to drafting an immediate replacement. Certainly not after a single season, and under a coach who has no track record of entrusting his offense to a rookie. Which didn’t stop a glut of “Carr is on his way out” speculation, with Gruden either becoming infatuated with the idea of Kyler Murray or Dwayne Haskins as the man to lead the Raiders in 2019. Carr has kept quiet on the subject other than taking the bait from ESPN’s stir-it-up host Max Kellerman, half-seriously challenging him to a fight on Twitter in late January. Kellerman was pushing for Murray, and opined of Carr, “You can tell when a quarterback doesn’t want it . . . I think Gruden knows they have to move on.” It was surprising in that Carr gets the media game better than most. He was able to laugh off reports he’d actually cried on the field when taking a beating in London against Seattle and playfully fends off queries about his ability to throw deep. Carr was back in midseason form in his first local availability since the end of the 2018 season when asked how he reacted to all the speculation about his hold on the position. After conversations with Gruden, general manager Mike Mayock and owner Mark Davis, Carr felt he knew what to expect. “When I watched the draft, there was like a negative 47 percent of a chance they were going to draft (a quarterback) in my mind . . . I’m honestly going to be here a long time,” Carr said. “Hope that’s OK with you guys, but you’ve got to get used to me.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. One of the most valuable commodities with a Gruden-run offense is time served. Health permitting, Carr in 2019 will quickly become the quarterback with the second most consecutive regular season starts under Gruden . Rich Gannon is atop the list with 48 from 1999 through 2001, followed by Brad Johnson (20) and Brian Griese (16) in Tampa Bay. Carr had his game stripped down and rebuilt to Gruden’s specifications and has been through 16 starts. Given Carr’s progress, Gruden had no intention of starting over again with someone new — let alone a rookie. A year ago, Carr would go home and stand in front of a mirror practicing play calls, learning the system, and then go on the field hoping to execute it. “I thought then I felt good, like, `Oh yeah, I’ve got this,’ ” Carr said. “Standing here now, I’m like, `Oh, my gosh . . . it’s like I’m on another planet. This is the second time in my career I’m getting to say the same things back-to-back.” Coach Jon Gruden and quarterback Derek Carr talk strategy. Carr not only speaks Gruden’s language (leaving out the profanity), but said he thinks the way Gruden thinks. “When he calls a certain play, I know what he wants me to look for and if it’s not there, get to this,” Carr said. I’m already a step ahead with that. I checked a play today, and he’s just sitting back there laughing. We hadn’t even talked about it yet. We’re on that same page and that’s nice.” Gruden has tired of defending Carr, and it’s easy to see why. Mild critiques of his quarterback are treated in some quarters as scathing indictments, and the remaining 95 percent of generally positive talk is often disregarded. Carr passed for 4,049 yards and also had career highs in completion percentage (68.9) and yards per attempt (7.3) while being sacked 51 times on a bad team. Joe Montana in his prime couldn’t have won with the 2018 Raiders. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“I think he’s pretty well respected as one of the best arm talents in football,” Gruden said. “He’s a lot more athletic than people think. If we can get some continuity here in this building with the system and supporting cast and improve the defense, I think he can be one of the best. I’m going to hold him to that standard and I think that’s what he wants.” Given the improvement in the receiving corps and if the offensive line can protect him, there’s every reason to think Carr can attain a level of respect similar to 2016. He was at the time a Most Valuable Player candidate and earned a contract that brings with it additional scrutiny. Of course, if Carr doesn’t reach that level, there are no guarantees he would be the man to lead the Raiders into Las Vegas in 2020. He fully expects to hear exactly that. “No doubt, right?,” Carr said. “Here we go again. Let’s just get through this year first, then we’ll play that game again. And I’ll probably have some fun with it. I’m not going anywhere. This is my team and it will be for however long I want to play.” It seldom works out that way in a year-to-year business, but 2019 belongs to Carr. It always did. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.