Mole Richardson

31 Dec 17
Fest Food

On tour the most important meal of the day might be the only proper one you eat over the Phish run – a nice, big brunch. Here’s a handpicked list of breakfast and lunch recs from locals in and around Brooklyn, where many people are staying this weekend. Click here for a Google Map of […]

16 Feb 19
News Archives Uk

A TODDLER was crushed to death after a fireplace fell on him while being mum nipped to the loo. The 60kg fireplace was dislodged from the wall and "hanging by a thread" when it fell on two-year-old Bram Radcliffe. Just giving Bram Radcliffe, two who dropped a 60kg fell on top of him His mum […]

12 Feb 19

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the publication of Hellboy: Seed of Destruction, Oregon’s Gigantic Brewing and Dark Horse Comics are teaming up to create 666 cases of Hellboy beer, based on award-winning cartoonist Mike Mignola’s legendary character.

12 Feb 19
GeekandGear.com

This year marks a quarter century since the publication of Mike Mignola and John Byrne’s Hellboy: Seed of Destruction (the first comic book miniseries featuring the iconic titular character), and to celebrate, Dark Horse Comics is teaming up with Gigantic Brewing to release six limited edition beers based on characters from the Hellboy comic books, with each beer […]

30 Jan 19
Fan Fest | For Fans, By Fans

If you are into movies and plan to visit theaters a lot more this year get excited because 2019 has some great features coming out this time around. I’ve compiled a list of 2019 film releases that will thrill any type of movie goer. Below I picked the top most anticipated movies to add to […]

27 Jan 19
THE IP FA©TOR

Once a patent has issued, claim can still be amended to correct errors or to narrow the scope of the claims. Such narrowing amendments must, however, be supported by the specification. No new material can be added. Often such claim amendments are requested due to cancelation or opposition proceedings, but they can also be ex-partes […]

24 Jan 19
The Scottish Sun
THE rivalry between two notorious London gangsters dubbed “The Robin Hood of the East End” and “The Boss of the Underworld” will be immortalised in a film. Once Upon a Time in London depicts the violent reign of Jack “Spot” Comer and then Billy Hill in the capital that lasted until the mid-fifties – and includes a cameo from ex-footballer Jamie O’Hara. Gangster Jack ‘Spot’ Comer, pictured after he was attacked by ‘Mad’ Frankie Fraser Billy Hill, Jack Spot’s one-time partner who was admired by the Kray twins Before the Kray twins and The Richardson “Torture” Gang in the 1960s, Spot and Hill were the razor-blade wielding faces of organised crime in the capital. Infamous bruiser Spot is said to have joined his first gang aged seven when boys from the Jewish side of his Whitechapel street fought the Catholic lads from the Irish end of the road. As his influence grew, he recruited crooks to enforce a protection racket that took in most of England’s major racecourses. Raised in a ghetto street he was soon living in a palatial Marylebone flat and being driven around London in a Cadillac convertible. He was coined “Spot” either because of the mole on his cheek or because whenever there was trouble he was always on the spot (his version). Spot described himself as the “Robin Hood of the East End”, who would travel up to Leeds, Manchester or Glasgow to fight rivals who threatened Jewish businesses. He and his mob would reportedly deal with rivals by using cut-throat razors. Spot also told of his preference for punching men as they stood at a pub’s urinals. He said: “Bump, down he goes, into the piss”. Hill was jailed for his part in the London Airport robbery and released in 1952 Jack ‘Spot’ Comer and his wife Rita receive congratulations outside the court after his acquittal Reggie Kray said Hill was his criminal role model because of his physicality and quick mind Spot was known for his anti-fascist activities and was allegedly behind a £1.25m heist on a warehouse at London Airport (now Heathrow) in July 1948 that was intercepted by Scotland Yard’s Flying Squad. From the mid 1940s Spot worked with Hill, making huge profits from brothels, drinking clubs and gaming rooms, as well as taking “protection” cash from businesses across the capital. Hill was jailed for his part in the London Airport robbery but by the time he was released, in 1952, he was ready to usurp his former partner. That year Hill masterminded the famous 1952 Eastcastle Street robbery of £230,000 from a Post Office van just off Oxford Street – equivalent to around £7.5m today. [quote credit=”London gangster Billy Hill “]I was always careful to draw my knife down on the face, never across or upwards[/quote] Hill published an autobiography titled ‘Boss of Britain’s Underworld’ where he detailed how he “striped” his rivals with a blade or “chiv”. He liked to carve a “V for victory” sign on his victims’ faces but insisted “chivving” was only deployed as a last resort. He wrote: “I was always careful to draw my knife down on the face, never across or upwards. Always down. So that if the knife slips you don’t cut an artery. “After all, chivving is chivving, but cutting an artery is usually murder. Only mugs do murder.” In 1956 Spot and his wife Rita were brutally attacked by Hill’s bodyguard “Mad” Frankie Fraser. After that Spot withdrew from the criminal underworld. He died in 1996, aged 83. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”2″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] As the Krays and Richardsons came to prominence, Hill retired from crime in the 1970s. Reggie Kray explained how Hill was his criminal role model. He said: “When I was in my early 20s the man I wanted to emulate most of all was the former gang boss of London’s underworld, Billy Hill. “The prime reason for my admiration was, that apart from Billy being very physical and violent when necessary, he had a good, quick-thinking brain.” Hill died on New Year’s Day 1984, aged 72. The film showing the gangster’s rivalry will be released later this year. Director Simon Rumley said: “The story of Jack ‘Spot’ Comer, Billy Hill and their respective battles to become King of London’s Underworld has remained one of Britain’s most dynamic, thrilling and untold stories, but we’ll be exploring it in depth, with psychological dexterity and aiming to make it a unique viewing experience and a great British film.” Jack ‘Spot’ Comer was a legendary East London gangster from the 1930s to 50s A film dramatising the violent reign of the two gangsters will be released this year Jack ‘Spot’ Comer showing the scar on his face Billy Hill kisses goodnight to Lady Docker after she left his party in Dean Street, London in 1955 Albert Dimes an enforcer who worked for Hill at William Barnet, Brighton Racecourse in August 1956 Gangster Tommy Falco showing the scar on his arm after a violent incident in which Comer was also injured Comer would travel up to Leeds, Manchester or Glasgow to fight rivals who threatened Jewish businesses Billy Hill lands in Southampton on the new one-class liner “Southern Cross” after being refused permission to land in Australia in June 1955 Filming for Once Upon a Time in London gets underway We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
24 Jan 19
The Sun
THE rivalry between two notorious London gangsters dubbed “The Robin Hood of the East End” and “The Boss of the Underworld” will be immortalised in a film. Once Upon a Time in London depicts the violent reign of Jack “Spot” Comer and then Billy Hill in the capital that lasted until the mid-fifties – and includes a cameo from ex-footballer Jamie O’Hara. Gangster Jack ‘Spot’ Comer, pictured after he was attacked by ‘Mad’ Frankie Fraser Billy Hill, Jack Spot’s one-time partner who was admired by the Kray twins Before the Kray twins and The Richardson “Torture” Gang in the 1960s, Spot and Hill were the razor-blade wielding faces of organised crime in the capital. Infamous bruiser Spot is said to have joined his first gang aged seven when boys from the Jewish side of his Whitechapel street fought the Catholic lads from the Irish end of the road. As his influence grew, he recruited crooks to enforce a protection racket that took in most of England’s major racecourses. Raised in a ghetto street he was soon living in a palatial Marylebone flat and being driven around London in a Cadillac convertible. He was coined “Spot” either because of the mole on his cheek or because whenever there was trouble he was always on the spot (his version). Spot described himself as the “Robin Hood of the East End”, who would travel up to Leeds, Manchester or Glasgow to fight rivals who threatened Jewish businesses. He and his mob would reportedly deal with rivals by using cut-throat razors. Spot also told of his preference for punching men as they stood at a pub’s urinals. He said: “Bump, down he goes, into the piss”. Hill was jailed for his part in the London Airport robbery and released in 1952 Jack ‘Spot’ Comer and his wife Rita receive congratulations outside the court after his acquittal Reggie Kray said Hill was his criminal role model because of his physicality and quick mind Spot was known for his anti-fascist activities and was allegedly behind a £1.25m heist on a warehouse at London Airport (now Heathrow) in July 1948 that was intercepted by Scotland Yard’s Flying Squad. From the mid 1940s Spot worked with Hill, making huge profits from brothels, drinking clubs and gaming rooms, as well as taking “protection” cash from businesses across the capital. Hill was jailed for his part in the London Airport robbery but by the time he was released, in 1952, he was ready to usurp his former partner. That year Hill masterminded the famous 1952 Eastcastle Street robbery of £230,000 from a Post Office van just off Oxford Street – equivalent to around £7.5m today. [quote credit=”London gangster Billy Hill “]I was always careful to draw my knife down on the face, never across or upwards[/quote] Hill published an autobiography titled ‘Boss of Britain’s Underworld’ where he detailed how he “striped” his rivals with a blade or “chiv”. He liked to carve a “V for victory” sign on his victims’ faces but insisted “chivving” was only deployed as a last resort. He wrote: “I was always careful to draw my knife down on the face, never across or upwards. Always down. So that if the knife slips you don’t cut an artery. “After all, chivving is chivving, but cutting an artery is usually murder. Only mugs do murder.” In 1956 Spot and his wife Rita were brutally attacked by Hill’s bodyguard “Mad” Frankie Fraser. After that Spot withdrew from the criminal underworld. He died in 1996, aged 83. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”316″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] As the Krays and Richardsons came to prominence, Hill retired from crime in the 1970s. Reggie Kray explained how Hill was his criminal role model. He said: “When I was in my early 20s the man I wanted to emulate most of all was the former gang boss of London’s underworld, Billy Hill. “The prime reason for my admiration was, that apart from Billy being very physical and violent when necessary, he had a good, quick-thinking brain.” Hill died on New Year’s Day 1984, aged 72. The film showing the gangster’s rivalry will be released later this year. Director Simon Rumley said: “The story of Jack ‘Spot’ Comer, Billy Hill and their respective battles to become King of London’s Underworld has remained one of Britain’s most dynamic, thrilling and untold stories, but we’ll be exploring it in depth, with psychological dexterity and aiming to make it a unique viewing experience and a great British film.” Jack ‘Spot’ Comer was a legendary East London gangster from the 1930s to 50s A film dramatising the violent reign of the two gangsters will be released this year Jack ‘Spot’ Comer showing the scar on his face Billy Hill kisses goodnight to Lady Docker after she left his party in Dean Street, London in 1955 Albert Dimes an enforcer who worked for Hill at William Barnet, Brighton Racecourse in August 1956 Gangster Tommy Falco showing the scar on his arm after a violent incident in which Comer was also injured Comer would travel up to Leeds, Manchester or Glasgow to fight rivals who threatened Jewish businesses Billy Hill lands in Southampton on the new one-class liner “Southern Cross” after being refused permission to land in Australia in June 1955 Filming for Once Upon a Time in London gets underway We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
24 Jan 19
OZeBuys

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy John Le Carré’s classic tale of espionage leaps off the page and into the guise of an epic 6 hour television miniseries. A mole has infiltrated the Circus, code name for the British Secret Intelligence Service.  It can only be one of four men operating at the very highest level. Agent […]

12 Jan 19
by 365 cuts

I got rid of the old toothpaste, she said I know they’re yours but they had nothing left There was enough, he said, to get me through But now there’s nothing here for me to use She pointed out her own was still quite full You’re making mountains out of a mole hill But tell […]

11 Jan 19
400 Favourite Books

Helen Maria Williams (1759 – 1827) was born to a Scottish mother and a Welsh father, and developed a reputation for her literary works in her 20s, writing on topics as wide-ranging as abolitionism and the natural world. Famously celebrated by Wordsworth in her own time, Williams penned a novel, Julia, revolutionary poems, and scores […]

07 Jan 19
Lighting and Studio

Vintage Mole-Richardson Model 412 Junior Solarspot 10″ 2K Tungsten Fresnel light – Buy – Vintage Mole-Richardson Model 412 Junior Solarspot 10″ 2K Tungsten Fresnel light

07 Jan 19
Lighting and Studio

Vintage Mole-Richardson Model 412 Junior Solarspot 10″ 2K Tungsten Fresnel light – Buy – Vintage Mole-Richardson Model 412 Junior Solarspot 10″ 2K Tungsten Fresnel light

06 Jan 19
Metal Mole Reviews

Bad News – Bad News Basically, the Young ones gone metal, with a joke pre-spinal tap, Spinal tap heavy metal band. Poking fun at all the cliches in Heavy metal, Vim Fuego (played by Ade Edmondson), Den Dennis (Nigel Planer), Colin Grigson (Rik Mayall [RIP]) and Spider Webb (Peter Richardson) play an amateurish group with big personalities but only a little bit of […]

26 Dec 18
thewanderingeyei's Blog

A guide to convert a fresnel tungsten light into a coolrunning bright LED fresnel.