Montana West

24 Apr 19
Close-Up Culture

Haley Finnegan’s debut short film, Westfalia, takes us on a road trip with a couple so desperate for Instagram fame that they start to lose sight of their surroundings – and each other. Ahead of the film’s screening at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival, Close-up Culture’s James Prestridge spoke to Haley to learn more about […]

24 Apr 19
The Sundress Blog

Leah Silvieus, author of the Arabilis, sat down with our editorial intern Eva Weidenfeld to discuss this upcoming release including the meaning behind its Latin-rooted title, the power of the seasons, the spiritual and sonic resonance of religion, and more. EW: Can you speak to what prompted you to choose the Latin language to title […]

24 Apr 19
West Palm Beach, Florida Consumer Credit Counseling Service | (800) 254-4100

Esto concluyó un estudio acerca del sector textil, ya que las primeras tienen entre dos y cuatro veces más de destinos internacionales. | Economía | Portafolio.co copyright © 2018 from Marcas propias exportan más que las que maquilan via Marcas propias exportan más que las que maquilan April 24, 2019 at 10:34AM Copyright © April […]

24 Apr 19
Ancestral Findings

Do you have pioneer ancestry? What is pioneer ancestry, anyway, since most explorers can be referred to as pioneers? Here is what is unique about American pioneer ancestry, and how you can find your pioneer ancestors.

24 Apr 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1648361-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1648361-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1648361-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1648361-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ A Feb. 20, 2019, photo shows the new sports book at Prairie Meadows in Altoona, Iowa. The Iowa House passed a bill Monday, April 22, that legalizes for the first time in Iowa betting on sporting events and fantasy sports, sending it to the governor for consideration. (Brian Powers/The Des Moines Register via AP) Lucille Brien plays a video poker machine at the Monte Bar and Casino in Billings, Montana, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Montana, Iowa and Indiana are poised to be the first states to legalize sports betting this year, almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court ended Nevada’s monopoly. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown) A player swipes the screen on a video poker machine at the Monte Bar and Casino in Billings, Montana, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court ended Nevada’s monopoly on sports betting, Montana, Iowa and Indiana are poised to legalize sports betting. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown) Patrons are seen playing video poker machines at the Palm Grand Casino in Billings, Mont., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Wieland says he’s likely to try sports betting as Montana is poised to legalize it. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown) Eric Wieland ponders his next play on a video poker machine at the Palm Grand Casino in Billings, Mont., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Wieland says he’s likely to try sports betting as Montana is poised to legalize it. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown) HELENA, Mont. — The number of states allowing sports betting is poised to expand. Governors in Montana and Iowa are considering measures that would allow residents to wager on sports, while Indiana lawmakers are scheduled to approve their own version as early as Wednesday. Barring a veto, they would be the first states to approve sports betting this year, joining six others that moved quickly last year after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed it nationwide. “We’re bringing what’s in the black market out into the open,” Montana state Sen. Mark Blasdel, a Republican, told The Associated Press on Tuesday. The legalization of sports gambling has not been as widespread as initially predicted after the court ruling ended Nevada’s virtual monopoly. Gambling expert Chris Grove had expected 10 to 12 states to legalize sports betting this year. Now, he said, it looks more like eight. Disagreements over the details — whether to offer bets online, how high taxes should be, who can get a license to run sportsbooks and what to charge for licenses — have slowed or doomed legislation in several states. “We’ll still end up with a healthy number, especially relative to how long gambling expansion usually takes,” said Grove, managing director of Eilers & Krejcik, a firm that researches gambling. Legal sportsbooks are running in eight states, including Nevada and New Mexico, where two tribal casinos are offering sports betting without explicit state approval. An Associated Press analysis of legislation introduced nationwide found that at least 29 states have considered legalizing sports betting this year. Measures have died in some states, including Kentucky and Maryland, and seem unlikely to go anywhere in others. Supporters want to capitalize on betting being done illegally and drive new business to casinos, bars and restaurants. Opponents warn that the cash coming into state treasuries won’t amount to much but that gambling addiction and illegal betting by minors will rise. The nation’s three most populous states — California, Texas and Florida — are not expected to legalize sports betting this year, mostly because of opposition from casino-operating Native American tribes and because it could require amending state constitutions. In Montana, lawmakers sent two separate legalization measures to the governor with bipartisan support. “A guy who wants to bet on the Chicago Cubs isn’t a Democrat or a Republican, he’s just a Cubs fan,” said Montana Democratic state Rep. Ryan Lynch, who sponsored one of the proposals. At the Monte Bar and Casino in Billings on Tuesday, Lucille Brien said she would be willing to give sports betting a try. As a Los Angeles Lakers fan, she likely would bet on basketball, but she said she couldn’t foresee sports gambling supplanting her favorite video poker game. “This is the only game I like now, but yeah, I probably would try it,” said Brien, 62, as she repeatedly swiped the screen. Across town at the Palm Grand Casino, Eric Wieland said he’s sure to bet on sports if it’s available. “If there was something in here right now that said I could bet $5 on a (New England) Patriots game, I would do that,” the 33-year-old said. Montana lawmakers urged Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock to sign both measures, which would create competing systems for sports betting. Bullock’s office has declined to say what he plans to do. One proposal would impose an 8.5% tax on sportsbooks and generate at least $800,000 a year in revenue for the state, according to the bill’s sponsor. The other would have the state lottery run the system and generate about $3.7 million in revenue during the first year, according to estimates. Some lawmakers were not swayed by the promises of new tax revenue. “Everybody in Montana is going to bet on sports, we’re going to be raking in the dough — I don’t believe that for a second,” state Sen. Dee Brown said during a floor debate this month. Supporters often use the promise of increased tax revenue as a pitch for legalizing sports gambling. But the AP found that even in the most optimistic projections, it would amount to less than 1% of most states’ budgets. Even after a strong March, four of the six states with newly legal state-sanctioned sports betting still lag well behind their own revenue expectations , according to an AP analysis of state fiscal reports. Rhode Island and West Virginia are bringing in less than one-fourth of the amount needed each month to hit their projections. Mississippi is on pace to bring in a little more than half what officials predicted, and Pennsylvania is on pace for about two-thirds of expected revenue. Only New Jersey and Delaware are on a path to meet their projections. Delaware’s numbers got help from a football parlay game that’s been run by the state lottery for years, while New Jersey was the first state to have a robust system of online sports betting. Some lawmakers have objected to an expansion of gambling on moral grounds and warn that offering sports betting on mobile devices will create a pathway for minors to start betting illegally. “This is an exercise in greed — avarice, if you will — and it troubles me greatly that we’re going to create new addicts,” said Iowa state Rep. Scott Ourth, a Democrat. Iowa lawmakers passed legislation Monday that would allow betting in its 19 licensed casinos or on a mobile app that the casinos establish. Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds said she hasn’t decided whether to sign the legislation but would consider public opinion. A Des Moines Register-Mediacom Iowa Poll published in February says 52 percent of residents opposed legalized betting on professional sports, while 68 percent opposed betting on college sports. “That’s what we’ll take into consideration when I sit down with the policy team and go through the bill, and we’ll make the decision going forward,” Reynolds said Tuesday. Iowa officials estimate taxes and licensing fees could bring in between $2.3 million and $4 million annually. ——— Mulvihill reported from Cherry Hill, New Jersey. ——— Associated Press reporters Matthew Brown in Billings, Montana, Tom Davies in Indianapolis, and David Pitt in Des Moines, Iowa, contributed to this report.
24 Apr 19
Helping History Come Alive

One of the most powerful tools for any genealogist is census records. I still seek these out and I love all the juicy details they provide: where my ancestor lived at a specific moment in time, who was living with them, and of course an idea of their age. They are “the building blocks of […]

24 Apr 19
KTLA

More Americans are breathing air that will make them sick, according to the American Lung Association’s annual State of the Air report. The country had been making progress in cleaning up air pollution, but during the Trump administration, it has been backsliding, the report says. Deregulation and climate change are largely to blame. President Donald Trump made a pledge in his 2017 State […]

24 Apr 19
MinnPost
[image_caption]Bruce D. Anderson[/image_caption]To date much of the discussion concerning sulfide mining has revolved around potential effects on water quality. The following comments focus on social and terrestrial impacts that could occur if Twin Metals sulfide mining proceeds. I acknowledge that I rely on copper in my electronics and vehicles. However, there are 20 existing copper mines in the United States and all occur in the arid west. None of the existing copper mines is found in a water-rich environment like northeastern Minnesota. The EPA has identified hardrock mining as the nation’s top toxic producing industry. It concluded that since 1997 this industry accounted for 41 percent of all toxics reported in 2010, or 1.6 billion pounds. [cms_ad:x100]Viewing sulfide mining in context When considering the potential impacts of sulfide mining on the environment, particularly on the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCA), policymakers, managers and the public need to view such mining in the context of other ongoing impacts to our state’s wild and natural places. Wetland drainage, loss of grasslands (CRP), and deforestation continue unabated in western Minnesota; frack sand mining, deforestation and forest insects and disease threaten the state’s southeast and central areas; and invasive species and unmanaged motorized recreation erode wildland character throughout Minnesota. Couple this with an expanding state population, which has increased from 3.4 million in 1960 to over 5.5 million in 2016, a 60 percent increase. A good metric in determining population density as it relates to open space is acres per person (APP). The state’s APP declined from 15 APP to 9.4 APP between 1960 and 2014. When considering the ratio of public land APP, there was approximately 3.4 APP in 1960 compared to 2.2 acres APP in 2014 — a 35 percent decline. The disappearance of Minnesota’s wildlands has been drastic. There has been a 95 percent loss, and by 2035 unmodified wildlands are projected to decline by 98 percent if current trends continue. The extent of wildland loss in terms of APP has dropped from about 383 acres per person pre-settlement to 2.6 acres per person today.  My experiences I’ve lived and worked in two areas affected by mining and one area affected by oil and gas development. Although mining and oil and gas development are distinct activities, the socio/environmental impacts are similar. While in the Black Hills I witnessed the development of a large open pit gold mine (Gilt Edge Mine). This open pit mine was moved forward through political pressure despite environmental risks. Today the Gilt Edge mine is an EPA Superfund site. When working/living in Montana I was part of a federal team to analyze development of a large platinum mine (Stillwater Mine). This proposal had issues similar to Minnesota’s sulfide mining proposals, including wilderness, endangered species, water quality, and an active tourism industry. I witnessed the large influx of people, which increased traffic congestion and illegal motorized intrusions into the wilderness. The setting of the area completely changed. Moreover, while living in Red Lodge, Montana, I visited mine tailings from the old Crown Butte Mine near the Clarks Fork River headwaters. I recall the orange, iridescent color of the stream pollutants. This too was declared an EPA Superfund site. The most discouraging impacts I witnessed occurred in the Bakken oil field in North Dakota. The entire social fabric and environmental setting were turned upside down. Over 500 oil/gas wells were developed on federal lands during my year tenure in the 1980s. The town I lived in tripled in size and public services were stretched thin. Entire drainages were altered. Toxic drilling chemicals and gases (hydrogen sulfide) were prevalent. Adverse impacts to wildlife including bighorn sheep, antelope, deer, golden eagles and prairie falcons were common. The cyclical boom/bust nature of energy development caused abandonment of public infrastructure projects, depressed housing markets, and undone environmental mitigation. [cms_ad:x101]Potential impacts If sulfide mining occurs near the BWCA, the region’s remote setting and naturalness would be degraded. Noise generated from mining operations would impact solitude up to 10 miles away. A population influx would create urban sprawl, increased un-managed motorized recreation, and increase the potential for invasive species establishment. Impacts to wildlife could occur. It’s recognized that the Rainy Lake Watershed (RLW), including the Twin Metals lease area, is home to many of the state’s rare animals and plants. Despite representing 1 percent of the state’s land area, the RLW contains 16 percent of the state’s rare species occurrences. Similarly, the distribution of rare features is disproportionate. Consider that 2 percent of the state’s Outstanding/High Bio-diversity and 8 percent of High Conservation Forest acres occur within the mineral lease area, which accounts for only .5 percent of the state’s land area. A substantial income source for the Ely area is tourism. It’s a gateway to the surrounding wildlands. This would change with mining. Visitors seeking natural settings would go elsewhere; ecotourism jobs could be lost. Moreover, mining is a “boom and bust” industry subject to national and worldwide economic cycles. It is clear that sulfide mining would degrade an exceptional tract of public land that is vital to local, state and national constituents and stakeholders. In order to protect, maintain and enhance these exceptional resource values, it’s essential that copper mining not be implemented. Bruce D. Anderson, of Chisago City, is retired from the U.S. Forest Service (37 years) and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (4 years). [cms_ad:x102]WANT TO ADD YOUR VOICE? If you’re interested in joining the discussion, add your voice to the Comment section below — or consider writing a letter or a longer-form Community Voices commentary. (For more information about Community Voices, see our Submission Guidelines.)
24 Apr 19
On The Road With Jim And Mary

Mary is no longer available for RV traveling, but we remain good friends. Because we have 5,000+ postings, I’ve invited her to continue posting entries on this blog. Sadly Mary is struggling with health issues. To see the latest about her situation, click here To view past blogs, scroll to the bottom of this page […]

24 Apr 19
fox8.com

[vemba-video id=”van/ns-acc/2019/04/24/NA-18WE_CNNA-ST1-1000000005239c72″] CLEVELAND, Ohio – The American Lung Association’s 2019 “State of the Air” report ranks Cleveland the 9th most polluted city in the nation for year-round particle pollution. Cuyahoga County receives an ‘F’ grade for high ozone days and a ‘B’ grade for 24-hour particle pollution. The annual air quality “report card” tracks Americans’ […]

24 Apr 19
Spells

Stop cheating spells Voodoo love spells Love spells in Uk Love spells in London Love spells to get your ex back Voodoo love spells Love spells to make someone love you Love spells to make someone miss you Voodoo lost love spells Lost Love spells Love spells in Malaysia Love spells Qatar Love spells Kuwait […]

24 Apr 19
Spells

Your need a lost love spell caster, love specialist, voodoo spells caster, a witch doctor, a native healer, a spiritual healer, a traditional doctor, black magician? You need a spell caster? Looking for a love spells caster? How to get a spell caster? You want a spell caster with in? Need to bring back your […]

24 Apr 19
Spells

Your need a lost love spell caster, love specialist, voodoo spells caster, a witch doctor, a native healer, a spiritual healer, a traditional doctor, black magician? You need a spell caster? Looking for a love spells caster? How to get a spell caster? You want a spell caster with in? Need to bring back your […]

24 Apr 19
Spells

overland park kansas,+27799215634Your need a lost love spell caster, love specialist, voodoo spells caster, a witch doctor, a native healer, a spiritual healer, a traditional doctor, black magician? You need a spell caster? Looking for a love spells caster? How to get a spell caster? You want a spell caster with in? Need to bring […]