Montgomery County News

17 Jul 19
Progressive News Service

The situation in Venezuela is bad, but not bad enough for refugees to be granted ‘temporary protected status’ in the U.S., says Trump administration. “The Trump administration has taken the lead in imposing sanctions on Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and in January was the first country to recognize National Assembly head Juan Guaidó’s claim to […]

17 Jul 19
News Directory

Fatal accident on 10-year-old girl Ledger Independent MOUNT STERLING – A Mason County child was killed in a Powell County accident on Wednesday, by Kentucky State Police and Montgomery …

17 Jul 19
Red Bluff Daily News
Wednesday Red Bluff Alcohol, Anger and Abuse Group: call for group time and location, 528-0226 Blood drive: 2-6 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., 242-3005 Downtown Farmers Market: 5-8 p.m. on Washington between Oak and Pine Community Dance: 7-10 p.m., Westside Grange, 20794 Walnut St. Overeaters Anonymous: 6:30-7:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Community Hospital, Russell room, 528-8937 PAL Martial Arts Women’s Self Defense: 5:30-6:30 p.m., 1005 Vista Way, Ste. C, 840-0345 Penny Bingo: 1-2:30 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Red Bluff Emblem club dinner: 5:30 p.m., Elks Lodge Red Bluff Joint Union High School Board: 5:30 p.m., 1525 Douglas St. Red Bluff Kiwanis: noon, Elks Lodge, 355 Gilmore Road Resource Conservation District of Tehama County: 8:30 a.m., USDA Service Center, 2 Sutter St., Ste. D Story Hour: 9 a.m., Red Bluff Library, 545 Diamond Ave. Tehama County Board of Education: 5 p.m., District Office, 1135 Lincoln St. Tehama County Child Abuse Prevention coordinating council: 8:30 a.m., Family Resource Center, 220 Sycamore St. Tehama County Library story time: 9:30 a.m., 545 Diamond Ave., 527-0604, except August Tehama County Mental Health Board: noon, Health Services Agency, Shasta Room, 1850 Walnut St., Bldg. D, 527-8491, Ext. 3018 Weight Watchers meeting: 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Hampton Inn, 1-800-651-6000 Widowed Persons Association of Red Bluff : 8 a.m. breakfast, 1 p.m. cards, call 366-1773 for location Work Incentives Planning and Assistance: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 220 Sycamore St., Ste. 101, 528-8066, free Y-FI Middle and High School Youth Group: 6:30-8 p.m., North Valley Baptist Church, 345 David Ave., 527-0543 Corning Achieve: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Corning Rotary: noon, Rolling Hills Casino Timbers Steak House, 2655 Barham Ave. Richfield School Board: 6 p.m., 23875 River Road, 824-3354
Tehama County Sanitary Landfill Agency: 6 p.m., City Council Chamber, 794 Third St. VFW Charity Bingo: 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 1620 Solano St., 824-5957, except July Los Molinos Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m., 25157 Josephine St. Bible Study: 1 p.m., Sherwood Manor, 7975 Sherwood Blvd., all welcome, 347-1330 Narcotics Anonymous: 7-8 p.m., 25204 Josephine St. Cottonwood Cottonwood Library Story Time: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 3427 Main St., 347-4818 School Readiness Play Group, ages 0-5: 10 a.m., Evergreen Elementary School, Room 30, 19415 Hooker Creek Road, free, 528-7348 – September through May only Thursday Red Bluff Adoption Support Group: 4 p.m., Tehama County Library, 528-7947 American Legion and VFW Dinner: 5-7 p.m., Veterans Hall on Oak Street, open to the public California Heat Chorus – Sweet Adelines: 7 p.m., Grace Community Fellowship, 598 Roundup Ave., 521-8037, all women who sing are welcome Communication and Healthy Relationships: 6-8 p.m., Family Resource Center, 529-1500 ext 118 Community Action Agency: 3 p.m. Board of Supervisors chambers Low Impact Aerobics: 8-9 a.m., $1, Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., 527-8177 Main Event Gallery: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 710 Main St. Marine Corps League: 6:30 p.m., Elks Lodge, new members call Steve at 604-5512 Nurturing Parent Classes: 3-5 p.m., Bridgeway Community Church, 345 David Ave., free, meal provided, 527-8491, Ext. 3068 PAL Martial Arts: ages 5-18, 10 a.m. to noon, 1005 Vista Way, Ste. C, free, 529-7950 Penny Bingo: 1-2:30 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Phoenix Community Support Group for chemical dependency: 11:30 a.m., Presbyterian Church, 838 Jefferson St., 945-2349 Red Bluff Exchange Club: noon, M&M Ranch House, 645 Antelope Blvd. #1 Red Bluff Joint Union High School District Board of Trustees: 5:30 p.m., 1525 Douglas St. Red Bluff Lions Club: 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial, 527-6616 Red Cross Disaster Volunteers Meeting: 6-7:30 p.m., Cal Fire headquarters, 604 Antelope Blvd., north side of Antelope, 934-5344 Reeds Creek School District Board of Trustees: 4:40 p.m. Sacramento River Discovery Center Thursday Evening Program: 7 p.m., 1000 Sale Lane, 527-1196 Senior Chair Volleyball: 1 p.m. Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Support group for pet loss: 2 p.m., Family Service Agency, 1347 Grant St., 527-6782 Swinging Squares Square Dance Club: 7 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., beginner or review classes, 529-1615 Tehama County Democratic Central Committee: 6 p.m., Lariat Bowl, 365 S. Main St., 527-7406 Tehama County Health Planning Council, noon: Elks Lodge, 355 Gilmore Road Tehama County Planning Commission: 9 a.m., board chambers, 745 Oak St. Tehama Speakers Toastmasters: 6 p.m., Jackson Heights School Widowed Persons Association of Red Bluff dinner: 5 p.m., call 366-1773 for location Corning Corning High School Board: 7 p.m., 643 Blackburn Ave. Corning Patriots: 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 1620 Solano St. Dual Diagnosis Group: 1:30-3 p.m., 1600 Solano St., 527-8491, Ext. 3309 Improved Order of Red Men: 7 p.m. Independent Grange 470, 20945 Corning Road, 824-1114 Soccer training: 4-6 p.m., Woodson School Soccer Field, 150 N. Toomes, 824-7680 Los Molinos Central Tehama Kiwanis: 7 a.m., Mill Creek Restaurant Los Molinos Unified School Board: 7 p.m., Los Molinos High School cafeteria Gerber Gerber-Las Flores Community Service District: 5:30 p.m. 331 San Benito Ave. Mineral Mineral School Board: 5 p.m., 38355 Scenic Ave. Friday Red Bluff Celebrate Recovery: 7 p.m., High Point Assembly of God, 625 Luther Road, 527-0445 or 366-6298 Main Event Gallery: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 710 Main St. Non-profit Round Table: 12:15 p.m., Lariat Bowl, 365 S. Main St., 527-2223 Red Bluff Rotary Club Sunrise: 7 a.m., M&M Ranch House Corning Bilingual Computer Class: 9-11 a.m., Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Car Show: 5-9 p.m., Bartels Giant Burger, 22355 Corning Road, local car clubs welcome, 824-2788 Interview Workshop-Work First: Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Los Molinos Narcotics Anonymous: 7-8 p.m., 25204 Josephine St. Saturday Red Bluff Farmers market: 8 a.m. to noon, River Park, EBT, debit and credit cards accepted Main Event Gallery: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 710 Main St. Widowed Persons Association of Red Bluff: noon, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Jefferson and Elm, 366-1773 Cottonwood Airplane display: 8 a.m. to noon, Lake California Airpark. Entrance for the public is available with a valid ID. 347-6712 Tehama Tehama County Museum: 1-4 p.m., 275 C St., tours on other days by appointment, 384-2595 or tcmuse@tehama.net Sunday Red Bluff AA Live and Let Live: noon and 5:30 p.m., 785 Musick St., seven days a week except Thursday meets at 8 p.m. Al-Anon New Comers At Heart: 6:30-7:30 p.m., Presbyterian Church, 838 Jefferson St., Room 3 Cottonwood Airplane display: 8 a.m. to noon, Lake California Airpark. Entrance for the public is available with a valid ID. 347-6712 Monday Red Bluff Alcoholics Anonymous, Experience, Strength and Hope: 10 a.m., Monday through Thursday, High Point Assembly of God, 625 Luther Road Community Band rehearsal: 7-9 p.m., Presbyterian Church, 838 Jefferson St., all musicians welcome, 527-3486 English as a Second Language, citizenship classes: 5:30-8:30 p.m., 1295 Red Bud, 736-3308, same time Tuesday and Wednesday and 9 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. Thursdays, free childcare from 9 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. classes in Richlieu Hall, 900 Johnson St. HIRE — Head Injury Recreational Entity: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., St. Elizabeth Community Hospital Wright Room, Rusty, 529-2059 Narcotics Anonymous: 11 a.m. to noon, 838 Jefferson St., Room 3, Monday through Saturday and 5:30-6:30 p.m. Saturday Narcotics Anonymous: 7-8:30 p.m., 785 Musick St., every day except Thursday PAL Martial Arts: ages 5-18, 10 a.m. to noon, 1005 Vista Way, Ste. C, free, 529-7950 Playtime Pals school preparation playgroup: 10-11:30 a.m., ages 0-5, 220 Sycamore St., Ste. 101, free, 591-2370 Red Bluff Masterworks Chorale rehearsal: 6:45 p.m., Presbyterian Church, 838 Jefferson St. School Readiness Play Group, ages 0-5: 10 a.m., Reeds Creek Elementary School, Room 6, 18335 Johnson Road, free, 528-7348 – September through May only Sun Country Quilters Community Service Group: 9 a.m. to noon, Stitch by Stitch, 810 Main St., http://www.suncountryquilters.com Sun Country Quilters Guild Meeting: 7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 735 Oak St., http://www.suncountryquilters.com TeenScreen Mental Health Appointments: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., free, by appointment, 1900 Walnut St., 527-8491, Ext. 3012 TOPS Club (take off pounds Sensibly): 8:30 a.m., First Christian Church, 926 Madison Ave., 527-7541 or 347-6120, visit http://www.tops.org Venture Crew 1914 meeting: 6:30-8 p.m., Moose Lodge on 99W, coed ages 14-20 Widowed Persons Association of Red Bluff cards: 1 p.m., call 366-1773 for location Corning Achieve: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Alcoholics Anonymous: noon, Monday through Friday, 5 p.m. Thursday, 7 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday, 783 Solano St., behind the church Computer Lab hours: 2-4 p.m., 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Mobile dental van: Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 520-6913 Narcotics Anonymous: 7-8:30 p.m., 820 Marin St., meetings daily Story Hour: 10 a.m., Corning Library, 704 3rd St. Tuesday Red Bluff Alzheimer’s and dementia support group: 6 p.m., Lassen House, 705 Luther Road, 529-2900 Cribbage Club: 6 p.m., Lariat Bowl, 527-4606 First Five Tehama: 3-5 p.m., Tehama County Department of Education, 1135 Lincoln St. International Order of the Rainbow for Girls: 6:45 p.m., Masonic Hall 822 Main St. 527-6715 Low Impact Aerobics: 8-9 a.m., $1, Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., 527-8177 Oak Creek Women’s Golf Club: 8 a.m., 2620 Montgomery Road, 529-0674 PAL Kickboxing: 6 p.m., 1450 Schwab St., 529-8716 or 200-3950 Penny Bingo: 1-2:30 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Red Bluff Rotary: noon, Elks Lodge Take Off Pounds Sensibly – TOPS: 10 a.m., First United Methodist Church, 525 David Ave., 529-3312 or 529-1414 Tehama County Board of Supervisors: 10 a.m., board chamber, 727 Oak St. Tehama County Tea Party Patriots: 6 p.m., Grange Hall, 20794 Walnut St. WWE self defense training for women: 5:30-7 p.m., 1005 Vista Way, Ste. C Corning Achieve: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Family Resource Center, 824-7670 Bilingual Computer Class: 9-11 a.m., Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 City Council: 6:30 p.m., City Hall, 794 Third St. Disabled American Veterans: 7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 1620 Solano St. Mobile Dental Van: NVCS Corning Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 520-6913 Soccer training: 4-6 p.m., Woodson School Soccer Field, 150 N. Toomes, 824-7680 Tuesday Art Group,: 1-4 p.m., Corning Senior Center, 1015 Fourth Avenue Los Molinos School Readiness Play Group, ages 0-5: 10 a.m., Los Molinos Elementary School, First Steps Building, 7700 Stanford Ave., free, 384-7833 – September through May only Tehama Cemetery District: 4 p.m., cemetery office, 7772 Woodland Ave. Gerber School Readiness Play Group: 10-11:30 a.m., 0-5, free, 7700 Stanford Ave., 384-7833 – September through May only Wednesday Red Bluff Downtown Farmers Market: 5-8 p.m. on Washington between Oak and Pine Community Dance: 7-10 p.m., Westside Grange, 20794 Walnut St. Overeaters Anonymous: 6:30-7:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Community Hospital, Russell room, 528-8937 PAL Martial Arts Women’s Self Defense: 5:30-6:30 p.m., 1005 Vista Way, Ste. C, 840-0345 Penny Bingo: 1-2:30 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Red Bluff Airport Commission: 5:30 p.m., City Hall, 555 Washington St. Red Bluff Kiwanis: noon, Elks Lodge, 355 Gilmore Road Soroptimist International of Red Bluff: 5:30 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., siredbluffclub@yahoo.com Story Hour: 9 a.m., Red Bluff Library, 545 Diamond Ave. Weight Watchers meeting: 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Hampton Inn, 1-800-651-6000 Widowed Persons Association of Red Bluff : 8 a.m. breakfast, 1 p.m. cards, call 366-1773 for location Y-FI Middle and High School Youth Group: 6:30-8 p.m., North Valley Baptist Church, 345 David Ave., 527-0543 Corning Achieve: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Corning Rotary: noon, Rolling Hills Casino, Timbers Steak House, 2655 Barham Ave. Exchange Club membership meeting: 7 p.m., Iron Skillet Mobile Dental Van: NVCS Corning Family Resource Center, 175 Solano Street, 520-6913 VFW Charity Bingo: 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 1620 Solano St., 824-5957, except July Los Molinos Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m., 25157 Josephine St. Bible Study: 1 p.m., Sherwood Manor, 7975 Sherwood Blvd., all welcome, 347-1330 Narcotics Anonymous: 7-8 p.m., 25204 Josephine St., Wednesday and Friday Cottonwood Cottonwood Creek Watershed Group: 6:30 p.m., Community Center, 347-6637 Cottonwood Library Story Time: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., library, 3427 Main St., 347-4818 School Readiness Play Group: ages 0-5, 10 a.m. Evergreen Elementary School, Room 30, 19415 Hooker Creek Road, free, 528-7348 – September through May only Thursday Red Bluff American Legion and VFW Dinner: 5-7 p.m., Veterans Hall on Oak Street, open to the public California Heat Chorus – Sweet Adelines: 7 p.m., Grace Community Fellowship, 598 Roundup Ave., 521-8037, all women who sing are welcome Good Morning Red Bluff: 7:50 a.m., Applebee’s, 220 Antelope Blvd. Low Impact Aerobics: 8-9 a.m., $1, Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St., 527-8177 Main Event Gallery: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 710 Main St. Nurturing Parent Classes: 3-5 p.m., Bridgeway Community Church, 345 David Ave., free, meal provided, 527-8491, Ext. 3068 PAL Martial Arts: ages 5-18, 10 a.m. to noon, 1005 Vista Way, Ste. C, free, 529-7950 Penny Bingo: 1-2:30 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Phoenix Community Support Group for chemical dependency: 11:30 a.m., Presbyterian Church, 838 Jefferson St., 945-2349 Red Bluff Exchange Club: noon, M&M Ranch House, 645 Antelope Blvd. #1 Red Bluff Lions Club: 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial, 527-6616 Senior Chair Volleyball: 1 p.m. Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Swinging Squares Square Dance Club: 7 p.m., Community Center, 1500 S. Jackson St. Tehama Speakers Toastmasters: 6 p.m., Jackson Heights School Widowed Persons Association of Red Bluff dinner: 5 p.m., call 366-1773 for location Corning Achieve: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Family Resource Center, 175 Solano St., 824-7670 Degree of Pocahontas Silver Cloud Council # 168: 7 p.m. Independent Grange 470, 20945 Corning Road, 824-1114 Dual Diagnosis Group: 1:30-3 p.m., 1600 Solano St., 527-8491, Ext. 3309 Mobile Dental Van: NVCS Corning Family Resource Center, 175 Solano Street, 520-6913 Soccer training: 4-6 p.m., Woodson School Soccer Field, 150 N Toomes, 824-7680 Women’s Support Group: 6 p.m., West and South streets, 824-7670
17 Jul 19
how to connect asus zenfone to pc

Asus zenfone 4 max zc554kl price in bd camera hdminote ASUS Zenfone Max Pro M2 in Depth Review in Bangla – ATC, time: 9:24 Keyone asus zenfone 4 max zc554kl price in bd pocket wifi trim 20:32 – Read more. Get Deal. how to connect asus zenfone to pc Reply Can you please explain what […]

17 Jul 19
how to connect asus zenfone to pc

Asus zenfone 3 deluxe 5 5 zs550kl driver cosmi ASUS ZenFone 3 Deluxe – вундер-лопата. Подробный обзор ZenFone 3 Deluxe: все недостатки и козыри, time: 9:23 Zte asus zenfone 3 deluxe 5 5 zs550kl driver thinnest smartphone under zte 12:45 – Features Beauty PixelMaster 3. I do not really use the camera much as I’m […]

17 Jul 19
Tell my story.

Page six of Katie Wilson Meade’s narrative continues from the trip out of the jungle back to civilization. This section picks up from the last sentence of page five in the previous post. The men walked along side of the wagon, so when the oxen got stubborn the men yelled and lashed them with long […]

17 Jul 19
WDTN
DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – The Montgomery County auditor’s office has started the process of reappraising properties damaged by the Memorial Day tornadoes. Montgomery County’s 2020 property revaluation process was nearly complete when the tornadoes hit, but appraisers now have to revisit thousands of properties, according to officials. In letters sent to local jurisdictions, Auditor Karl Keith says he wants to make sure property owners are not faced with paying a full tax bill for extensively damaged properties. Officials started the process Monday of taking pictures of properties in the tornadoes’ path. “The unforeseen expenses that we will have – I’m still in the process of getting the damages repaired,” said Elba Alicia Pagan, who lives in Dayton. Pagan told 2 NEWS she’s worried about those expenses after her home was damaged in the tornado, and several trees on her property fell down. But her property taxes may go down as Montgomery County works to reappraise properties damaged by the tornadoes. According to Chief Deputy Auditor Kate Evans, officials will revisit and reexamine as many as 15,000 parcels in the storm’s path. “Some of them are vacant lots, some of them wouldn’t have any damage,” Evans said. “We’re really looking at somewhere between 3,000 and 5,000 parcels having some sort of damage.” Many of those properties were looked at shortly before the storm as part of the county’s revaluation process that takes place every six years, Evans said. “We had very recent before imagery from late spring,” Evans said. “So we have a really good comparison between the two, and we were able to kind of really piece together what that storm track meant.” Some neighbors told 2 NEWS they feel optimistic that the reappraisal process will make a difference. “Come tax time, I know that my budget is going to greatly appreciate that relief,” Pagan said. The auditor’s office is encouraging those with damaged properties to fill out an application for a damaged property deduction. The process of taking photos of properties in the tornadoes’ path will continue into August, Evans said. The auditor’s office has informed local jurisdictions about the process and the vehicle workers will use to revisit properties, she added. Property owners affected by the tornadoes will learn how their properties have been revalued toward the end of the year, Evans said. Grab the FREE WDTN News App for iPhone or Android. Stay up to date with all the local news, weather and sports as well as live newscasts and events as they happen.  Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for all the latest news, weather and sports.
17 Jul 19
WIAT
Birmingham, Ala. (WIAT) — Donald Watkins Sr.’s reputation precedes him in Birmingham. Prior to his conviction on federal fraud charges, Watkins Sr. made legal history when he won an acquittal for HealthSouth founder Richard Scrushy in the Department of Justice’s first prosecution under the 2002 Sarbanes Oxley Act. As a civil rights attorney or hired legal gun for Birmingham’s first African-American Mayor, his has been a love-hate relationship with the place called the Magic City. Early in his tenure with the city, Watkins was criticized. “People would say, ‘he’s making all that money off the City of Birmingham.’ What they didn’t realize is Birmingham was self-insured. They didn’t have no big insurance company writing checks for Birmingham. It was cheaper to pay me than to pay the $200 million in exposure it had in the 74 cases that I had. And so, they didn’t have to pay out in my cases. Just pay me and I’ll make sure you don’t have to pay out the bigger things….so anywhere else that’s called a bargain. In Birmingham that’s called controversial,” Watkins explained. Controversial or not Watkins made Birmingham a place of opportunity for himself, from the moment he approached Mayor Richard Arrington Jr. about a job. “My old man got the appointment for me,” Watkins said. The late Levi Watkins Sr. was President of Alabama State University at the time that Richard Arrington Jr. was heading the Alabama Center for Higher Education. After serving one term on the Montgomery City Council beginning in 1979, Watkins was ready to make a change. “I left the city council in Montgomery ’cause I wanted to come to Birmingham. Because it was where the action was. It was the big city. Arrington Jr. was the Mayor. He was catching hell. Everything he did was challenged.” By then Watkins had already made a name for himself as an attorney. As he writes on his website, by 1976 he had fought for “two long and heartbreaking years to secure” the pardon of Clarence Norris. At the time, Norris was the last living of the so called, “Scottsboro Boys” . Eventually all nine of the men would be granted a pardon in their convictions on false rape charges dating back to 1931, in a racially segregated Alabama. Watkins had also shown he was not afraid to challenge long held norms regarding police treatment of African Americans during the Montgomery police killing of Bernard Whitehurst in 1975. The victim’s mother hired Watkins who uncovered a police cover up in Whitehurst’s death. In 2015 Watkins wrote about his role pursuing justice for Whitehurst in the New York Daily News. By the time it was over Montgomery’s mayor had resigned, “About 10 cops lost their jobs” and the head of Montgomery’s police department retired. As Watkins recollected, all the boards in the city that had never been autonomous before, now wanted autonomy. “I knew it was a shot gun marriage with the business community and it was uncomfortable. A lot of difficult moments”, Watkins said. Watkins’ father set up the meeting where Watkins pitched Arrington Jr. on how he could be of service. “He was polite, but he was busy”, Watkins said of Arrington Jr.. Watkins didn’t waste time getting to the point. “I said, I see you getting your butt kicked all day long. I said when you are up at two or three in the morning, getting your butt kicked, who do you call for help?” Watkins said he didn’t have an answer. I told him want to be that guy. That’s how I got [the job as Richard Arrington Jr.’s attorney]. He hand-wrote my retainer agreement out right there on the spot.” Donald Watkins came to Birmingham to work with Richard Arrington Jr. during his second term as Mayor in 1985. The two worked together in city government for 14 years. “We had a great time using what I called power politics to advance the agenda for the constituents who elected him.” Their efforts were buoyed by the Jefferson County Citizens Coalition. “It handled the political side of progress in Birmingham, while the Arrington administration handled the actual function of government.” Watkins said, “We had a good relationship. We still do. He’s a business partner.” Richard Arrington Jr. was granted immunity to testify for the prosecution in the Donald Watkins Federal Fraud trial.
17 Jul 19
Seeds of Clementine

Xi chào (Hello)! My name is Chau Huynh, and I’m currently attending West Chester University. I’m a Communication Studies major set to graduate before the first snow fall of 2019. Well…maybe not quite before the first snowfall due to the fact that in Pennsylvania the snow has a mind of its own. Maybe this year […]

16 Jul 19
WDVM
SILVER SPRING, Md. (WDVM) — One area in Montgomery County is making changes to bring more residents and jobs to their community. Officials have been working to build new developments in White Oak over the past few years. So far, the community has a brand new Adventist Health Care hospital which is set to bring thousands of jobs to the area. A 300-acre center is being built for resident and commercial development. The new development is located near the food and drug administration and the inner county connector highway. “The idea being that there are a lot of established residential communities here in this part of the county and we want the residents of those communities to be able to find jobs here in their community,” said Shana Davis-Cook, Friends of White Oak Board. The Adventist Health Care hospital is set to open in August.
16 Jul 19
WISHTV.com
WASHINGTON (AP/WISH/CNN) — U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks of Indiana was among four Republicans in the Democratic-led House who voted to condemn President Donald Trump’s “racist comments” against four congresswomen of color, despite protestations by Trump’s Republican congressional allies and his own insistence he hasn’t “a racist bone in my body.” Two days after Trump tweeted that four Democratic freshmen should “go back” to their home countries — though all are citizens and three were born in the U.S.A. — Democrats muscled the resolution through the chamber by 240-187 over strong GOP opposition. The rebuke was an embarrassing one for Trump, and he had appealed to GOP lawmakers not to go along. ONLINE: Vote on House Resolution 489PDF: Read House Resolution 489 The measure carries no legal repercussions for the president and the vote was highly partisan, unlikely to cost him with his die-hard conservative base. Brooks represents Indiana’s Fifth Congressional District stretching from north Indianapolis to Marion. She said Monday in a statement about Trump’s tweets, “As Americans, there is more that unites us that divides us. The President’s remarks to my colleagues across the aisle are inappropriate and do not reflect American values. ALL of our elected officials need to raise their level of civility in order to address the serious issues facing the county.” Brooks’ spokeswoman did not immediately reply to an email seeking comment about her vote. Brooks issued this statement Tuesday night: “Yesterday, I issued a statement regarding the President’s recent inappropriate remarks because I believe they do not reflect American values. I believe our diverse backgrounds as Americans make our country greater and stronger. These differences should be celebrated by all of us. Today, I voted to condemn the racially offensive remarks the leader of our country made. However, I remain disappointed that the Democrats refuse to hold their own members accountable for their targeted, anti-Semitic and hateful speech. “The lack of civility between the executive and legislative branches has reached an unacceptable low. We must remember our words matter and carry great weight. Our words and the ways in which we deliver them have a lasting impact on those who hear them. My hope for our country is that we can move beyond divisive rhetoric in order to more effectively govern.” Brooks announced in June she will not seek reelection in 2020. Two Democrats have already announced their intention to run. RELATED: Indiana GOP congresswoman calls Trump tweet ‘inappropriate’ | Leave the US, Trump tells Democratic congresswomen of color | Trump digs in amid censure of racist tweets about lawmakers The resolution says the House “strongly condemns” Trump’s “racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” Republicans say Democrats are using the uproar over Trump’s comments to score political points. But Democrats say such comments were revolting and needed to be vilified, especially coming from the president. Trump didn’t back down and tweeted that lawmakers unhappy with the U.S. “can leave.” Before the showdown roll call, Trump characteristically plunged forward with time-tested insults. He accused his four outspoken critics of “spewing some of the most vile, hateful and disgusting things ever said by a politician” and added, “If you hate our Country, or if you are not happy here, you can leave!” — echoing taunts long unleashed against political dissidents rather than opposing parties’ lawmakers. The president was joined by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and other top Republicans in trying to redirect the focus from Trump’s original tweets, which for three days have consumed Washington and drawn widespread condemnation. Instead, they tried playing offense by accusing the four congresswomen — among the Democrats’ most left-leaning members and ardent Trump critics — of socialism, an accusation that’s already a central theme of the GOP’s 2020 presidential and congressional campaigns. Even after two-and-a-half years of Trump’s turbulent governing style, the spectacle of a president futilely laboring to head off a House vote essentially proclaiming him to be a racist was extraordinary. Underscoring the stakes, Republicans formally objected after Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California said during a floor speech that Trump’s tweets were “racist.” Led by Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia, Republicans moved to have her words stricken from the record, a rare procedural rebuke. After a delay exceeding 90 minutes, No. 2 House Democrat Steny Hoyer of Maryland ruled that Pelosi had indeed violated a House rule against characterizing an action as racist. Hoyer was presiding after Rep. Emanuel Cleaver of Missouri stormed away from the presiding officer’s chair, lamenting, “We want to just fight,” which he apparently aimed at Republicans. Despite Hoyer’s ruling, Democrats flexed their muscle and the House voted afterward by party-line to leave Pelosi’s words intact in the record. Some rank-and-file GOP lawmakers have agreed that Trump’s words were racist, but on Tuesday party leaders insisted they were not and accused Democrats of using the resulting tumult to score political points. Among the few voices of restraint, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Trump wasn’t racist, but he also called on leaders “from the president to the speaker to the freshman members of the House” to attack ideas, not the people who espouse them. “There’s been a consensus that political rhetoric has gotten way, way heated across the political spectrum,” said the Republican leader from Kentucky, breaking his own two days of silence on Trump’s attacks. Hours earlier, Trump tweeted, “Those Tweets were NOT Racist. I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” He wrote that House Republicans should “not show ‘weakness'” by agreeing to a resolution he labeled “a Democrat con game.” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, one of Trump’s four targets, returned his fire. “You’re right, Mr. President – you don’t have a racist bone in your body. You have a racist mind in your head and a racist heart in your chest,” she tweeted. The four-page Democratic resolution said the House “strongly condemns President Donald Trump’s racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” It said Trump’s slights “do not belong in Congress or in the United States of America.” All but goading Republicans, the resolution included a full page of remarks by President Ronald Reagan, who is revered by the GOP. Reagan said in 1989 that if the U.S. shut its doors to newcomers, “our leadership in the world would soon be lost.” Republican leaders lobbied GOP lawmakers hard to oppose the resolution. McCarthy called the measure “all politics,” and No. 3 House GOP leader Liz Cheney of Wyoming said the four Democrats “are wrong when they attempt to impose the fraud of socialism on the American people.” The showdown came after years of Democrats bristling over anti-immigrant and racially incendiary pronouncements by Trump. Those include his kicking off his presidential campaign by proclaiming many Mexican migrants to be criminals and asserting there were “fine people” on both sides at a 2017 neo-Nazis rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that turned deadly. And the strong words in Washington come as actions are underway elsewhere: The administration has begun coast-to-coast raids targeting migrants in the U.S. illegally and has newly restricted access to the U.S. by asylum seekers. Trump’s criticism was aimed at four freshman Democrats who have garnered attention since their arrival in January for their outspoken liberal views and thinly veiled distaste for Trump: Ocasio-Cortez and Reps. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. All were born in the U.S. except for Omar, who came to the U.S. as a child after fleeing Somalia with her family. The four have been in an increasingly personal clash with Democratic Speaker Pelosi, too, over how assertively the House should be in trying to restrain Trump’s ability to curb immigration. But if anything, Trump’s tweets have served to ease some of that tension, with Pelosi telling Democrats at a closed-door meeting Tuesday, “We are offended by what he said about our sisters,” according to an aide in the room who described the private meeting on condition of anonymity. That’s not to say that all internal Democratic strains are resolved. The four rebellious freshmen joined Rep. Steven Cohen of Tennessee and a handful of others who wanted the House to vote on a harsher censure of Trump’s tweets. And Rep. Al Green of Texas was trying to force a House vote soon on whether to impeach Trump — a move he’s tried in the past but lost, earning opposition from most Democrats. At the Senate Republicans’ weekly lunch Tuesday, Trump’s tweets came up and some lawmakers were finding the situation irksome, participants said. Many want the 2020 campaigns to focus on progressive Democrats’ demands for government-provided health care, abolishing the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency and other hard-left policies. “Those ideas give us so much material to work with and it takes away from our time to talk about it,” Sen. Mike Braun of Indiana said of the Trump tweets.
16 Jul 19
Fed Up Democrat

Report & Action Alert from the Great John Gilmore June 16, 2019 – One of the heroes of our Religious & Health Freedom Movement in New York is John Gilmore, founder of the Autism Action Network autismactionnetwork.org He is one of the most reliable primary sources for valid and up to date information on Health […]

16 Jul 19
WISHTV.com
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (WISH) — A 17-year-old Bloomington teen was charged as an adult with attempted murder in connection with the stabbing of a 13-year-old summer camp student at Indiana University, according to charging documents filed Tuesday in Monroe Circuit Court. Dongwook “Mikey” Ko was also charged with aggravated battery, kidnapping with a deadly weapon, strangulation and confinement following the alleged attack in the IU Jacobs School of Music’s practice building, located at 1024 E 3rd St. Ko had been a student in the String Academy summer camp in 2018, according to the probable cause affidavit obtained by News 8. The stabbing victim was identified by authorities as a 13-year-old violin student from Florida. She told investigators Ko had lured her from her practice room to another floor in the building under the pretense of meeting with her teacher, according to the affidavit. Instead, she said, the boy took her to a locker room and pinned her against a locker. She said she screamed and attempted to fight off Ko, eventually kicking him and causing him to fall. She said Ko pulled her to the ground with him, where they continued to fight before he choked her, grabbed a knife and stabbed her as she continued to scream. The Indiana University Jacobs School of Music’s Music Addition Building is shown July 16, 2019, in Bloomington, Indiana. (WISH Photo) A university employee heard the screams and eventually separated Ko and the girl, allowing her to escape the locker room, according to the affidavit. Ko attempted to flee when the employee escorted him downstairs and was apprehended by detectives at his home, charging documents state. A summer camp counselor who found the girl bleeding in a stairwell called 911. Emergency medical technicians who treated her found approximately 10 cuts on the girl’s body, they told detectives. At least three “larger” cuts — two on her left hand and one on her leg — required stitches at the hospital, according to the affidavit. The girl called her injured left hand her “violin hand” in an interview with detectives, adding she thought she was “going to die” during the attack. Ko’s mother said he called her prior to his arrest and told her repeatedly, “I don’t know what I did” and “I may have hurt her.” He returned home with cuts on his arms and blood on his clothing, and told his mother he had been pulling a “prank” on the girl, she told detectives. Ko was transferred Tuesday from a juvenile detention center to the Monroe County Jail in lieu of $150,500 bond. Chuck Carney, a spokesperson for IU Bloomington, declined to comment.
16 Jul 19
Comedic Pursuits

Comedic writer and performer Kristin OBrien talks about her comedy work in DC and the exciting projects she’s got coming up with her duo, Zach and Kristin.

16 Jul 19
WISHTV.com
FRANKFORT, Ky. (WISH) — An Indianapolis man faces 13 criminal charges after he allegedly brought 12 Indiana children younger than 14 to Kentucky to sell candy for him for profit, Kentucky authorities said Tuesday. The Kentucky Attorney General’s Office charged Shawn Floyd, 54, with 13 misdemeanors: 12 counts of endangering the welfare of a minor and a count of controlled substance prescription not in original container. Bowling Green, Kentucky, police began questioning Floyd during a traffic stop Friday. Floyd was detained, and 12 children were placed in protective custody. In addition to selling the candy, Floyd also forced the 12 children to sleep in one hotel room with three adults, the attorney general said in a news release. The children also were forced to buy their own meals and water. The youngest child was 11, the release said. It did not mention the ages of the other children, but Kentucky labor law requires a person to be at least 14 years old to be employed. On Friday, the attorney general’s office had been notified of about 25 solicitor permits issued in Bowling Green, mostly for minors. The office had also received information referencing Floyd for possible human trafficking of minors occurring in Anderson, Jessamine and Warren counties in Kentucky and Daviess and Fayette counties in Indiana over the past two years. The office said it had an open investigation involving Floyd prior to the filing of charges. Floyd was arraigned Monday and has a pretrial conference set for 9 a.m. Sept. 4 in Warren County, Kentucky. He has bonded out of the Warren County, Kentucky, Regional Jail in Bowling Green, according to online records. Anyone who have information on people being exploited for commercial sex or labor can call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 888-373-7888 (or text 233733) for immediate assistance. Interpreters are available.
16 Jul 19
Property Blog

Philadelphia-based incubator network 1776 is opening a new location in North Bethesda. The new 15,000-square-foot space at 12358 Parklawn Drive will open this winter at the 100,000-square-foot Greencourt Innovation Center and comes as the company prepares to close its Crystal City location and open a new D.C. outpost near Lafayette Square. Last year, the company […]