Musical Fidelity

22 Feb 19
From The Horse`s Mouth

[ad_1] We knew that a revolution was taking place when global smartphone brands launched in India a series of handsets incorporating Hi-fi and smart music as their main theme. Their motto for the Indian audience is to Play Hi-fi and Live Smart. The offering was one-of-its-kind in the country and proved to be a boon […]

22 Feb 19
The Coach's Team

By Jim Bray TechnoFile.com A couple of interesting new titles have premiered on 4K disc this week, one of which is a rehash of an old theme while the other one is also a rehash of an old theme – but with a decidedly weird twist. Let’s start with Overlord, which Paramount sent in 4K. […]

22 Feb 19
slkellydotorg

On an artic March afternoon in 1964, I switched on the cream-colored plastic clock-radio set at 850 on the AM dial in my bedroom. Despite the snow showers that had begun trickling intermittently in my hometown of Wellesley, Massachusetts, when I heard the baseball-themed jingle on WHDH Radio Boston that afternoon, it might as well […]

22 Feb 19
On Jewish Matters

The following article was first published by the Israel Genealogy Research Association‘s Web-site on April 24th 2018 –  All Rights Reserved = © 2017. In June 2018, the article was published in Spanish and Protuguise by the SEPHARDIC GEN WEBSIT. It was translated from Hebrew to English by by Yechezkel (“Chezi”) Rappoport, President. The American Friends of […]

22 Feb 19
Superphonica

Asynchronous 24bit 96KHz USB to SPDIF Converter. This still sounds great. If you have an older DAC with Optical or Coaxial inputs, this little guy will feed them excellent sound from any computer with a USB2.0 or above port. USB powered, not additional power supply required.  

21 Feb 19
Twin Cities
Dominick Argento, a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer who was likely the most celebrated creator of new American operas between the heyday of Gian Carlo Menotti in the 1950s and the advent of Philip Glass in the 1970s, died Wednesday at his home in Minneapolis, where he had lived for six decades. He was 91. His music publisher, Boosey & Hawkes, announced his death. The cause was not disclosed. Argento was always a force apart. He belonged to no compositional school, preferring a distinctly eclectic language that appealed both intellectually and emotionally to his audiences. At a time when most of the celebrated American composers were based on either the East or West Coast, where they could work together and help promote each other’s music, Argento lived and worked in Minneapolis throughout his career, teaching composition at the University of Minnesota and working closely for many years with the director Sir Tyrone Guthrie at what became the Guthrie Theater. Dominick Argento in the study of his Minneapolis home on Jan. 28, 2003. Currently, he’s working on his first piece for children and, for the first time in his career, a project outside of commission — an opera based on Giuseppe di Lampedusa’s book “The Leopard.” (Joe Rossi / Pioneer Press) In 1976, Argento spoke of his passion for the singing voice for ASCAP Magazine: “The voice is not just another instrument. It’s the instrument par excellence, the original instrument, a part of the performer rather than an adjunct to him.” He said that he wanted his work to “communicate, not obfuscate.” He once described himself to High Fidelity Magazine as a traditionalist “in the broadest sense.” “I have never had any desire to write music for library shelves. If you want a school, include me in the Mozart, Verdi, Mussorgsky school,” Argento continued. In all, he wrote a dozen operas, including “Christopher Sly” (1963), “Postcard from Morocco” (1971), “The Voyage of Edgar Allan Poe” (1976), “Miss Havisham’s Fire” (1979) “Casanova’s Homecoming” (1984) and “The Aspern Papers” (1988). Several of these works have entered the repertory. When searching for material for his operas, Argento told the Washington Post in 1990, he looked for “stories where the human condition is in some kind of crisis, where someone is struggling, facing a very difficult emotional situation — even things like madness.” It was a song cycle called “From the Diary of Virginia Woolf,” a setting of eight entries from Woolf’s diaries, that won Argento the Pulitzer Prize in 1976. He later said that this was a “piece that, when it was finished, was even better than I’d hoped for.” The world premiere took place in Minneapolis with the distinguished English soprano Janet Baker as the soloist. When asked by High Fidelity how he felt when the work received one of music’s highest honors, he replied: “The Pulitzer Prize? You mean Christmas in May. I did not even know the piece had been submitted.” Dominick Argento was born Oct. 27, 1927, in York, Pa. His parents were recent Sicilian immigrants who ran an inn and restaurant. He was largely self-taught as a child, listening to musicians who visited the area and reading biographies of composers, including Gershwin to Stravinsky. After service in the Army in the 1940s, Argento studied at the Peabody Institute conservatory in Baltimore on the G.I. Bill. His principal teachers at Peabody were Nicolas Nabokov and Hugo Weisgall, the latter of whom introduced him to opera. Argento graduated in 1951. He later worked with Luigi Dallapiccola in Florence, a city he would grow to love deeply. Several other widely divergent composers — Howard Hanson, Alan Hovhaness and Henry Cowell among them — nurtured Argento’s lifelong eclecticism. He received a doctorate in musical composition from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y., in 1958. His first opera, “Sicilian Limes,” a setting of a work by the Italian writer Luigi Pirandello, received its premiere in 1954. Argento later withdrew it, along with several other works that he considered juvenilia. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] A later work, the song cycle “Casa Guidi,” based on writings by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, received a Grammy Award in 2004 for best contemporary classical composition. Argento moved to Minneapolis in 1958 to teach at the University of Minnesota and never left for long. He retired from teaching in 1997 and also helped to found the company that became the Minnesota Opera. Argento was married to the soprano Carolyn Baker from 1954 until her death in 2006. During their long years of marriage, the Argentos spent their summers (and sometimes the whole year) in Florence, which they regarded as a second home. After his wife’s death, Argento composed a musical tribute, “Evensong: Of Love and Angels,” which had its premiere at Washington National Cathedral in March 2008. Argento was considered a deeply inspiring teacher, and his students included Libby Larsen and the late Stephen Paulus. Daron Hagen, another American composer who has worked extensively in opera, wrote a fan letter to Argento while a teenager growing up in Wisconsin. “When I sent him my music and asked him for advice, I didn’t really expect him to respond, but he did, with gentle, persuasive wisdom and integrity,” Hagen said Thursday. “His letter ended with an invitation to come to work with him. For Argento was America’s greatest opera composer: Like Verdi, he knew that his every note of lyric theater was subject to revision; he promoted his creative vision without an ounce of personal grandstanding; he was humble personally, and artistically regal, and never, never forgot that opera is about the human voice.”
21 Feb 19
European Film (2019)

Romantic movies never really appealed to me, new or old. Perhaps the only romantic films I’ve genuinely enjoyed have only ever been romantic stories in the context of a larger genre or theme – an action movie, a musical, etc. Furthermore, I’ve always had an aversion to movies that depict infidelity, as they often border […]

21 Feb 19
E Street Shuffle

Recycled melange or original organ donor? Either way, “American Beauty” ranks among the best songs of Bruce’s Magic period.

21 Feb 19
Suzy Goes See

Steven is not present to plead his case, but he is clearly not the marrying type.

21 Feb 19
Archy Worldys

Jean-Christophe Bailly Writer Humanity , my peasant grandfather and communist took his nap after reading it and sometimes even before it was finished, but he always read me Pif the dog. Then, later, the newspaper paper was used to surround the oven-heated bricks that were put in the beds. If that does not make a […]

20 Feb 19

By Brennan Kelly   They’re all turned away; faces pressed against the wall. The wood frames circumscribing their borders evince this rotational reversal, displaying the typically undisplayed—incidental flecks of paint, v-nails clasping mitred joints, hardware insets, and vacant nail holes. Despite their reversed orientation, each frame is still performing its principal function, framing (and thereby […]

20 Feb 19
charles odilo music blog

Do you have a passion for music and want to learn more about how it works? Are you a musician who learned by ear and has no formal training? Would you like to study music but are unsure of where to begin? Then this music theory blog is for you. This blog includes lessons that […]

20 Feb 19
The4thDave Blog

[Above: How I’m feeling this week.] Another one of these posts, Dave? Yeah, sorry about that. Lemme tell ya a little story: My wife and I celebrated Valentine’s Day on Saturday, with a tasty Japanese / Korean BBQ fusion place (highly recommended), so our plan for the big day Thursday was to watch a Ramsey Solutions […]

20 Feb 19
Americana UK

Son Volt’s new album is on the way next month and our over-excitement isn’t being helped by the drip drip of material from the record, including now a new video which focuses on the daily grind of being working musicians in their new video for the track ‘Devil May Care’, which premiered yesterday on Rolling Stone […]