Nba Finals 2019

17 Jun 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Press Enterprise
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Redlands Daily Facts
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Whittier Daily News
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Pasadena Star News
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Daily Breeze
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Daily Bulletin
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Sport Archives

VICENTE SALANER Sunday, 16 June 2019 – 23:28 ACB. Real Madrid clears ghosts and hits first in the final NBA The most Spanish ring What a pair of endings so different and so fascinating, for many reasons, are the ones that just ended in the NBA and the one that has just started in the […]

17 Jun 19
Daily News
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Orange County Register
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
Press Telegram
In the relative dark ages for the franchise, Lakers exceptionalism has taken on a new meaning. In the past few years alone, team executives have sworn to either play for championships or quit. Jim Buss gave himself a deadline to contend – one he never met. Magic Johnson similarly gave himself a timeline to get stars, coming home with LeBron James last summer before following through with his threat to quit. MORE COVERAGE: Lakers agree to acquire Anthony Davis in blockbuster trade Whicker: With Kuzma staying and Davis coming, it’s no longer LeBron or bust for Lakers Alexander: Two days in, the Lakers have won the offseason … for what that’s worth Reaction to Lakers trade for Anthony Davis – LaVar Ball predicts no championships General manager Rob Pelinka hasn’t said as much – big all-or-nothing declarations are not his style – but the pattern remains the same. More is expected of the Lakers: more wins, more stars, more championships. And without those things, the scrutiny and pressure build to turn things around for a franchise that rarely has been lost in the wilderness for long. “I think simply put, the best way to quiet the noise is to do what the Lakers do and that’s to win and to compete for banners,” Pelinka said last month, when criticism whipped furiously around the Lakers’ organization. “The noise will exist if you’re not doing that.” In that sense, trading for Anthony Davis on Saturday is a deal that turns down a particular kind of heat. Pelinka finally hammered out the deal that had been dangled for months, securing a player who has twice finished in the top five of MVP voting at just 26 years old and breathing new energy into next year’s squad. The timing is also particularly apt: After suffering two critical injuries to Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson in the Finals and with free agency looming, the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the West is slipping. A team with James and Davis – who averaged a combined 53.3 points, 20.5 rebounds, 12.2 assists and 3.0 blocks last season – poses a real threat in a post-Warriors-dynasty world. It’s a mega-wattage pairing, one with few true parallels in NBA history. But even as Pelinka, team owner Jeanie Buss and other Lakers executives have eased one kind of pressure, other kinds are immediately arising. They now have two generational talents, but they’ll have to prove that they can build a team around them, and that the investment in one year of Davis will yield an extension next summer when he becomes a free agent. As more details become clear about the deal, it’s clear that the Lakers gave up much of their future to win now. In addition to Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – all first-round picks – ESPN and other outlets reported the Lakers sent the Pelicans a sizeable package of draft assets: the No. 4 pick this season, a top-8 protected pick in 2021 (which could become an unprotected pick in 2022), a pick swap in 2023 and an unprotected pick in 2024 (that can be deferred to 2025). It’s a complicated collection of assets, but the bottom line is that the Pelicans will control the Lakers’ draft picks for years to come. It will likely be a long time before the Lakers can amass lottery talent like they did the past few years with Julius Randle, D’Angelo Russell, Ingram and Ball. There’s even more of a crunch factoring in how it will affect the Lakers’ salary cap. The earliest the deal can be officially completed is on July 6, but the Lakers could get cap relief if they sign the No. 4 draft pick and wait until that player becomes tradeable later in the month. While that’s the clearest path to getting the roughly $32 million required for a third max salary slot – which the Lakers would need to go hunting for a big game free agent like Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler or Kemba Walker – it doesn’t necessarily behoove the Pelicans to wait that long, particularly if they trade away the fourth pick. A team that trades for that caliber of prospect would likely want him in hand as soon as possible, particularly considering Las Vegas Summer League begins on July 5. Furthermore, Davis has a $4 million trade kicker he can exercise that counts against the Lakers’ salary cap. If the Lakers can’t wait to finish the trade, and if Davis doesn’t waive the kicker, their space will shrink to just under $24 million. That amount will prevent the Lakers from getting a third max contract player, and also will likely limit their options for chasing less prominent free agents in a market where an estimated 40 percent of the league’s active players will be available. Outside of the big names, shooters will be a premium for the team that finished second-to-last in 3-point shooting last year.  New coach Frank Vogel stressed in his introduction that the Lakers offense needs shooting to create space, which becomes all the more important with James’ and Davis’ ability to make plays and score in the paint. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Backcourt play is all the more important given that the Lakers just traded away two starters from last year’s team, and virtually everyone else will be a free agent this summer. Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, draft picks from 2018, still remain for now. A possible X-factor is how much free agents still believe the Lakers’ prestige and James’ ability to lead championship-caliber teams. On James’ previous contending teams, past-their-prime stars (Mike Miller, Ray Allen) have come to team up with him and provided helpful contributions. While the 2019 market will be more competitive than the 2018 version due to more teams with cap space, perhaps James’ and Davis’ ability to recruit players to their cause can give the Lakers an edge. It might be hopeful thinking in an era where Lakers exceptionalism hasn’t had its typical positive connotation. But now that the Lakers have taken one big step toward contending again, more will have to follow. The players themselves recognize this. James greeted Davis with an Instagram post captioned in part: “Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning.” It implies that there’s much more of a climb ahead, one James understands as well as anyone. The noise won’t stop until they get there. View this post on Instagram AD on da way!! @antdavis23 🤣. Let’s get it bro! Just the beginning..👑 #LakeShow A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Jun 15, 2019 at 8:16pm PDT
17 Jun 19
SQ Sports

KZ Okpala got a late start to playing basketball, but his physical tools paired with his high upside will force some GM in the late first round to take a flyer on him.

17 Jun 19
Arcynewsy

In less than a week, there have been significant events that will likely change the landscape for Los Angeles and all 30 teams heading into the 2019-20 NBA season. From Kawhi Leonard defeating the Golden State Warriors in the 2019 NBA finals to those of Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson, the Lakers traded their entire […]

16 Jun 19
High Velocity Sport

We knew that the postseason would affect free agency. But the idea was that the success or failure of certain teams would affect what their free agents’ thoughts about staying or leaving. Unfortunately, the last two games of The Finals brought devastating injuries to two of the three most coveted free agents on the market. Kevin […]

16 Jun 19
INSANE SPORTS

Nurse Confirms He Plans To Coach Team Canada – Toronto Raptors coach Nick Nurse confirmed Sunday that he plans to coach the Canadian national team, starting with the World Cup this summer. At Toronto’s first media availability since winning the NBA Finals, Nurse told reporters, “I’m getting ready to take another situation soon because I think it’s […]

16 Jun 19
Basketball Society

After months of speculation and rumors, Anthony Davis appears to be officially headed to the Los Angeles Lakers. Although we literally just got through an epic NBA playoff run, trade talks and free agency rumors lingered at the forefront. While most of us were conducting our routine summer Saturday activities, it was the perfect timing […]

16 Jun 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1688677-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1688677-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1688677-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1688677-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Lady Gaga performs at Brian Newman’s “After Dark” show at NoMad Restaurant on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (John Katsilometes/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @JohnnyKats1 Lady Gaga performs at Brian Newman’s “After Dark” show at NoMad Restaurant on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (John Katsilometes/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @JohnnyKats1 Lady Gaga and Brian Newman perform at Newman’s “After Dark” show at NoMad Restaurant on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (John Katsilometes/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @JohnnyKats1 Members of the Toronto Raptors spray champagne on the crows at Kaos Dayclub at the Palms on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (Kaos Nightclub) Star DJ Marshmello is shown with members of the NBA Champion Toronto Raptors at Kaos Dayclub on Saturday, June 16, 2019. (Kaos Dayclub and Nightclub) The Stanley Cup is shown at Omnia Nightclub at Caesars Palace on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (Hakkasan Group) Barry Manilow’s 76th birthday cake, presented to him at Westgate Las Vegas on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (Westgate Las Vegas) Marc Gasol, left, and Fred VanVleet of the Toronto Raptors celebrate their NBA championship at XS Nightclub at Wynn Las Vegas on June 14, 2019 in Las Vegas. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images for Wynn Las Vegas) Pascal Siakam of the Toronto Raptors celebrates the team’s NBA championship at XS Nightclub at Wynn Las Vegas on June 14, 2019 in Las Vegas. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images for Wynn Las Vegas) Star DJ Marshmello is shown with members of the NBA Champion Toronto Raptors at Kaos Dayclub on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (Kaos Dayclub and Nightclub) Members of the St. Louis Blues are shown with the Stanley Cup at Wet Republic at MGM Grand on Sunday, June 16, 2019. Members of the St. Louis Blues are shown with the Stanley Cup at Wet Republic at MGM Grand on Sunday, June 16, 2019. Cardi B performs at Kaos Dayclub and Nightclub at the Palms on Saturday, June 15, 2019. (Tony Tran) At about the time Lady Gaga sashayed into NoMad Restaurant to great hullabaloo at about half past midnight, word came down that “it” had arrived at Omnia Nightclub. “It” was, and is, the Stanley Cup, said to be the most famous trophy in sports. The Cup is currently in the (we expect) secure possession of the St. Louis Blues, who on Wednesday won the Stanley Cup Final in seven games over the Boston Bruins. View this post on Instagram The @stlouisblues #stanleycup @omnianightclub scene … A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 2:15am PDT Just hours after their civic championship parade in downtown St. Louis, members of the Blues ramped up the celebration by spraying champagne all over the place and drinking from the Cup at a rollicking Omnia. By Sunday afternoon, players had taken to Wet Republic at MGM Grand. The Cup was there, too. View this post on Instagram Cup! @stlouisblues #stanleycup @omnianightclub A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 1:23am PDT On the topic of splashy happenings, the esteemed Cardi B returned to Kaos Nightclub, taking the stage at about 3 a.m. and ripping through a sold-out set highlighted by “Money” and “Bodak Yellow.” No question, the weekend was a furious ride — even by Las Vegas standards. Gaga, Stanley Cup quaffing, some Puddles Pity Party action, fistic fury at MGM Grand Garden Arena … what else? Ah, an octet of Toronto Raptors, who roared through XS Nightclub on Friday night, cavorting with Marshmello at Kaos Dayclub. View this post on Instagram This … #stanleycup @stlouisblues @omnianightclub A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 1:12am PDT That pairing made sense, as the Raptors score buckets and Marshmello’s mask is one. The resident DJ dished an assist to NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard and his Raptors teammates Serge Ibaka, Patrick McCaw, Eric Moreland, OG Anunoby, Chris Boucher, Jordan Loyd and Malcolm Miller, who requisitely doused the dance scene with champagne. The night’s pugilistic center of attention was heavyweight champ Tyson Fury, being feted under the magical LED grid at Hakkasan Nightclub at MGM Grand. Fury threw more punches into the air than he did in his second-round dispatch of Tom Schwarz at Grand Garden Arena. View this post on Instagram I believe I heard @briannewmanny will be back in August. But this was during this swing sesh … @ladygaga A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 2:29am PDT The headlining DJ Nghtmre spun the sounds, showing he’s far better at feinting and ducking than the over-matched Schwarz. In his swift victory, actually seemed in a hurry to get to the club. The Gypsy King’s performance was remarkable power and efficiency; Fury actually spent less time boxing than Vegas entertainer Daniel Emmet did in singing the German and U.S. national anthems. And, in a totally unrelated event, Barry Manilow was surprised onstage at International Theater at Westgate Las Vegas with a 76th birthday cake. Manilow’s birthday is actually Monday, but the “Fanilows” were less concerned about the actual date than they were in singing a beautiful version of “Happy Birthday To You.” Manilow’s cake was wheeled out by Westgate Las Vegas General Manager Cami Christensen. In the resort world, Christensen is a star in her own right (and also good piano player who can play pieces from “Phantom of the Opera,” for you resort executive-trivia buffs). View this post on Instagram From last night: @barrymanilowofficial serenaded for his 76th birthday @westgatevegas (Westgate Las Vegas video) A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 2:12pm PDT Of course, one cannot be everywhere in this Cuisinart of events. My own adventure took me to the Fury fight, where it was good to run into the “America’s Got Talent” finalist Emmet (I’m expecting some announcement about his career soon), and also watch Mark Shunock work the crowd at a boxing event for the first time. Shunock, an in-arena emcee for Top Rank Boxing, is like when one of your buddies somehow finds a microphone and is turned loose at a fight card: “This is boxing! This is Top Rank!” In one cut-away from the seats, Shunock filled out an uncommon triumvirate with star chef Gordon Ramsay and pro basketball Hall of Famer Shaquille O’Neal. After Fury’s fury, the late-night hang was once more bandleader Brian Newman’s “After Dark” residency at NoMad. It’s been noted — especially by regular Kats! readers and also the NoMad staff — how frequently I’ve attended that show. The reason is, I go to the energy, like a moth to a flame, or a nomadic columnist to a fiery band. View this post on Instagram Meantime …. @ladygaga @briannewmanny @thenomadhotel A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 2:21am PDT Newman is a serious musician and, not insignificantly, the longtime bandleader for Lady Gaga. He and Gaga have worked with MGM Resorts Internationale officials (particularly Chris Baldizan, in attendance at Saturday’s show) to created a scene that hearkens to the vibe of classic Vegas. Newman’s show is hardly alone, of course. There are myriad Cool Hangs across VegasVille, effectively chronicled here, that capture the energy of the town’s superb artists. It’s certainly a deep-dive topic for another time, maybe when Newman returns for October, or even sooner. Newman’s shows have of course been fueled by Gaga’s repeated appearances, and word of her possible participation has created such a high demand that the line entering NoMad on Saturday snaked out to the Park MGM casino floor (trust me, it’s something of a walk). In keeping to his show’s variety template, Newman presented burlesque artist Miss Miranda and Puddles, who sings but never speaks. The towering comic clown unleashed the Pixies’ “Where Is My Mind,” and over the years has formed an odd-fitting bromance with Newman (the two kiss after Puddles is done singing). “He never talks to me,” Newman says. “He only sings to me.” View this post on Instagram Winnah! @tysonfuryrealchampionofficial @hakkasanlv #TKO #then #shots A post shared by John Katsilometes (@johnnykats1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 2:52am PDT In capping her current run in “Enigma” and “Jazz + Piano,” Gaga capped this night with such familiar numbers as “Fly Me to The Moon” and “Call Me Irresponsible,” flouncing along the skinny wooden partition between NoMad’s booths. She pulled open Newman’s shirt, crouched to the ground and summoned a healthy sing-along to “Just A Gigolo.” Whether at Park Theater or in a late-night hang, Gaga always commits. On most nights, the NoMad scene would have been the place to be in Las Vegas. But somewhere, those tourists sipping bubbly from the Stanley Cup were saying the same thing. John Katsilometes’ column runs daily in the A section. His PodKats podcast can be found at reviewjournal.com/podcasts. Contact him at jkatsilometes@reviewjournal.com. Follow @johnnykats on Twitter, @JohnnyKats1 on Instagram.