Neanderthals

16 Jun 19
Musings of a Modern Day Neanderthal

ITAM Vol 4 4  DISPOSAL Volume 4 defines the processes that an organization may use to integrate the ITAM program into the asset disposal functions. 4.1       Disposal This process is executed when one or more hardware assets are targeted for disposal. The process steps are discussed in more detail in the subsequent paragraphs. […]

16 Jun 19
Towards the Sky

<Message from the translator:> I saw that another translator had started translating starting from this chapter, but it wouldn’t discourage me from continuing my own translation. Although my speed isn’t as fast as the other’s, I hope that you stick around here and bear with the wait m(._.)m The schedule will be sporadic, but I’ll […]

16 Jun 19
Explorator

Thanks to Arthur Shippee, Dave Sowdon, Edward Rockstein, Kurt Theis, John McMahon, Barnea Selavan, Joseph Lauer, Mike Ruggeri, Hernan Astudillo, Richard Campbell, Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Bob Heuman, David Critchley, Richard Miller, Kris Curry, Rick Heli, Richard C. Griffiths, Peter Ramsden, Don Buck, and Ross W. Sargent for headses upses this week (as always hoping I […]

16 Jun 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
There’s a great scene in “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” where Mr. Hand is teaching his class about Cuba — only to be interrupted by a pizza delivery guy bringing a double-cheese-and-sausage to Jeff Spicoli. “Am I hallucinating? What in the hell do you think you’re doing?” asked an exasperated Mr. Hand. “Learning about Cuba, and having some food,” said a completely relaxed Mr. Spicoli. That scene was in my mind a lot this past week, ever since my column last Sunday announcing our first “PizzaPalooza” for 20 of our regular letter-to-the-editor writers. That’s probably because, while I thought it was a fun idea, there was no way of knowing what might actually unfold. After all, I was bringing together people with extremely different viewpoints, and I knew at least a couple of them probably didn’t like each other very much — whether they’d actually met, or not. These are, after all, extremely contentious times on our local political landscape, and people on both sides of numerous issues are quite passionate about their beliefs. I was, as Mr. Hand once said, “on dangerous ground.” Some of our letter writers agreed. One wrote and said “I cannot in good conscience share space — much less pizza — with some of the people I think are going to come.” It got worse. On Facebook, someone wrote “legitimizing oppressive a–holes is a damn depressing waste of pizza.” A couple of others suggested my choice of pizza for lunch was … racist. (Seriously. You could look it up.) And others complained about what kind of pizza was going to be served — even though I hadn’t told a single person what kind of pizza would be served, and the people doing all of the complaining said they weren’t going to come anyway! It all made me think of yet another Mr. Hand quote: “What are you people? On dope?” So, shaking off accusations that I was nothing more than an insensitive, pizza-loving neanderthal, the rest of us forged ahead. And, I’m really glad we did, because come Friday, it was well worth the effort. Simply put, my expectations and even my highest hopes were blown away by what happened in that room filled with six Celestino’s pizzas, a tub full of soft drinks and 20 E-R letter writers. One of the first to arrive was Ronald Imhoff. We got to chatting and I was thrilled to learn his late brother was Darrall Imhoff, the former NBA player, Olympic gold medalist and Cal basketball star. Imhoff was halfway through a great story involving his brother (and the night Wilt Chamberlain scored 100 points) when Roger Beadle walked into the room. He heard the name “Darrall Imhoff” and lit up, telling Ronald how he grew up in Lafayette and loved watching Darrall play basketball at Cal. So here we had two guys who had never met, and quite possibly never agree with a single thing in each other’s letters, excitedly talking about Cal basketball over pizza in our office. (I love stuff like that.) It got better, and deeper, from there  — and that’s because our guests took the conversation in any direction they wanted, which is exactly what I had hoped would happen. After a few minutes of chatting about the paper, several attendees talked about their hopes for the meeting (which, really, had no agenda other than “let’s meet, have pizza and talk”), and it was touching how in-sync everyone was with their hopes: Constructive dialogue. Respecting each other’s differences. Recognizing that what you say on social media in the heat of an angry moment isn’t going to change anyone’s mind. The revolutionary idea that even if we have differing opinions on any subject, we should on occasion set aside some of those differences in search of a common goal. One brought up a brilliant John F. Kennedy quote: ““Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us.” At least one mentioned a strong desire of not attending, but came anyway in hopes it would lead to something constructive. Another said she was just a few weeks into involvement with Chico politics, and already burned out by the divisiveness, but felt a ray of hope after sitting in a room with people of such diverse viewpoints. None of us left thinking we’d solved any of the world’s problems. But, we walked away knowing each other a little better, and that if we’re ever going to agree on anything, it has to start with a level of basic civility, and this was a pretty good first step. We agreed on another thing: We need to keep doing this. I’ll come up with some more pizza get-togethers, and you’d better believe “the original group” will be reconvened sometime in the future. Because, really, it all has to start somewhere. And if our get-together leads to one act of productive civility and positive steps in the future where none would have existed before, it will have been well worth it. After all, it’s not just about “your” point of view, or “my” point of view. To quote the great Spicoli one final time: “If I’m here and you’re here … doesn’t that make it “our” time?” Mike Wolcott is the editor of the Enterprise-Record. He’ll be on vacation next week and his column will return June 30. If you’d like to add to his collection of emails he probably won’t see for a few days, send one to mwolcott@chicoer.com  
16 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
IT takes a special kind of moron to desecrate a war memorial just days after the heroes of Normandy were honoured on the 75th anniversary of D-Day. When the rest of us were shedding tears as we watched a handful of proud old men return to France to relive the historic turning point of WW2, some low life yobs were planning on making their own sick headlines. It’s actually beyond belief that the memorial at Duchess of Hamilton Park in Motherwell was covered in red writing, with phrases such as ‘rats’, ‘scum of the earth’ and ‘cowards’. It’s a despicable act at any time, but to wait until such a significant anniversary leaves me shaking my head and asking what kind of monstrous society have we created. What on earth would possess someone to do such a thing? Honestly, I’m stumped — can someone help me because I’m utterly lost for words. It’s a serious question, by the way – what point were they trying to make? There have been plenty of questionable wars over the years, but WW2 was one of those rare events when it was a proper case of good triumphing over evil. And never was their a more critical battle than that which occurred on the blood-soaked beaches of Normandy 75 years ago. Yet in the eyes of some little neanderthal, the men who made the ultimate sacrifice were “cowards” and “scumbags”. It made me wonder what would have happened if the current generation of young guys — including the yobbos who think it’s clever to defile war memorials — were handed the task of defending our freedom against an evil tyrant like Hitler. Frank McAvennie sympathises with ‘s****ed out’ Celtic daft rocker Rod Stewart I’d love to see how they would have fared, storming the beaches of northern France and charging a machine gun position, armed only with a tin of paint and a smart phone. Sure, we can all moan that the youth of today don’t have any respect for their elders . . . but this goes way beyond a lack of respect. From someone who will never come within a million miles of the kind of horrors our front-line troops endured in both world wars. So it got me thinking. I’ve got a mate in Cyprus who’s son has just completed two years of national service, including six months with the special forces. And you’ll be hard-pushed to meet a more pleasant lad — polite and respectful. I reckon it’s about time we reintroduced it over here to help knock some sense into the layabout yobs who are polluting our streets. Back in 2015 Prince Harry called for it to be brought back in for the country and I agree wholeheartedly. Not only would it teach them respect but it would also instil some discipline into their lives — as well as teaching them important life skills and perhaps even a trade for when their stint was over. I respected my elders because that’s how my mum and dad brought me up. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s reaction to Trump visit shows he doesn’t have what it takes to lead country, says Macca I also had a skill and through football I learned about discipline and the importance of listening and paying respect when someone older, with more experience, wanted to make a point. Sadly, there is no structure in the lives of too many young people just now. Their parents should be positive role models but all too often that is not the case, They have never experienced a working life under a boss or a line manager. Nobody is grabbing them and pushing them in the right direction. So they are left to fall through the cracks. And what happened at the war memorial in Motherwell is the end result. The schools should play a part too — and they could start by educating these numbskulls all about the brave souls who gave their lives in the name of freedom. Hope for top game HALF-EMPTY stadiums tell you all you need to know about how much interest there is in the Women’s World Cup. That’s the harsh and inescapable reality. Women’s football legend Hope Solo So it’s up to the TV companies to get the message across and the viewing figures here in the UK have been decent. The BBC made a smart move employing former USA goalkeeper Hope Solo as a pundit. She shoots from the lip and doesn’t mind ruffling a few feathers. She might even be the female Chris Sutton. That’s meant as a compliment by the way. I’m not feeling the love I’VE tried to watch Love Island but, I’m sorry, it’s garbage. OK, maybe it’s not aimed at people my age, but if this is the best we can come up with to keep our young people entertained then it’s a sad day. Frank isn’t a fan What annoys me most is that this country has created a culture of Z-listers (and I only call them that because I ran out of letters) who think just being selected for a reality show means they have made it. Forget putting in all the years of graft that other celebrities have had to go through. This bunch reckon just sticking on a bikini or showing off your ripped body and flirting in front of the cameras should set them up for life. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”76″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] When they realise that, once the show is over, nobody is interested in what they’re doing, it’s little wonder so many experience mental health issues. It’s fine when you have a talent to fall back on. There will always be work for comedians, actors, singers, entertainers and sports stars because they have the opportunity to use their skills in a different way. But when all you have is your looks, you’ve got your work cut out to make the fame last longer than 15 minutes. [bc_video video_id=”6045410957001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Winston Churchill’s great-great grandson John Winston Spencer Churchill, 12, lays a wreath at Normandy memorial “] We pay for your stories and videos! Do you have a story or video for The Scottish Sun? Email us at scoop@thesun.co.uk or call 0141 420 5200  
16 Jun 19
Newsy Today

Lithic tools, bone remains and a promising horizon. And the deepest and most serious prospects have not yet begun. After Gran Dolina and Sima de los Elefantes, two names linked in the popular imagination with prehistory and human evolution, the Atapuerca scientists, who restart the work on the 17th, tackle one of the most surprises […]

16 Jun 19
Making the world a better place day by day😀

Life appeared on earth 3.5 billion years ago and it had to wait a couple of billion years of evolution for the first modern human, Homo sapiens to appear around 150,000 years ago. Before that, around 4 million years back the evolution of humans began in Ethiopia with the first species known as Australopithecus afarensis […]

16 Jun 19
Damien Marie AtHope

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.24.1″][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.24.1″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.24.1″][et_pb_image src=”http://damienmarieathope.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Capturettrytuyui.jpg&#8221; _builder_version=”3.24.1″][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.24.1″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.24.1″][et_pb_text _builder_version=”3.24.1″] Art by Damien Marie AtHope    Hell yes, I am against the fraud that is the world religions. Why not be against the promotion of woo-woo pseudo-truth, when I am very against all pseudo-science, pseudo-history, and pseudo-morality and the harm they can produce. […]

16 Jun 19
A Skeptic Search for Truth

How does facial hair fit into the theory? With our brain entropy theory, facial hair would be a way to heat up a brain that has gotten too cool. Women rarely have it. Women have smaller heads. Men’s doesn’t start until puberty. And It doesn’t grow on the nose, cheeks, or forehead. Men have bigger […]

15 Jun 19
THE ABSURD TIMES -- STILL

To: <czar.donic1> THE ABSURD TIMES Such a sweet ruling family A few other thoughts first By Tsar Donic Perhaps it would be better to call these Neanderthal Republicans (an electoral college majority still) as "Pro-Birth," rather than pro-life as they use the term. It does seem clear that once the child is born, they have […]

15 Jun 19
A History of Dubious Taste

Before I start this, I must declare an interest: many years ago, back when I was Entertainments Officer at college, we booked and I met Jo Brand. This would have been at the end of the 1980s/start of the 1990s, long before she was the national treasure she is now. She was utterly lovely, and […]

15 Jun 19
Scanned Retina - A Resource for the People!

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-makes-us-human-4150529 What Makes Us Human? Share Flipboard Email   Drawing of Hominid evolution through time. DEA/De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images Philosophical Theories & Ideas Major Philosophers by Lisa Marder Updated May 04, 2019 There are multiple theories about what makes us human—several that are related or interconnected. The topic of human existence has been pondered […]

15 Jun 19
Bookish Books

Intended for Bristol by L.P. Dover (Second Chances, #9) ebook, 233 pages Published December 6th 2016 by Loveswept Rating: 4/5 stars Goodreads Trying to live down his very public indiscretions, Carolina Cougars kicker Jaxon Reed feels like the most hated man in the NFL. When he’s traded away, his new teammates in California don’t waste […]