New Era

25 Jun 19
Ubergizmo

There are a ton of beautiful and scenic spots in the world that many people go to take photos of. However, most touristy places tend to be pretty crowded and filled with tourists, all of whom are trying to take the same photo. This usually results in a photo that is less than ideal due […]

25 Jun 19
The Reporter
One day after breaking his nose while fouling back a bunt attempt into his face in batting practice, Max Scherzer of the Washington Nationals pitched seven shutout innings in a 2-0 win over the Philadelphia Phillies last week. His face looked awful, black-and-blue around the eye sockets, nose all banged up, but it had no effect on his pitching. Or maybe it motivated the big right-hander, already known for his toughness. There have been other notable one-game heroics by injured baseball players. Curt Schilling’s bloody sock is now in the Baseball Hall of Fame. In Game 6 of the American League Divisional Series against the Yankees in 2004, he took the mound even though he had torn his tendon sheath earlier in the series. He pitched seven innings of one-run ball to help Boston win and even the series at three games apiece. By the end of his outing, TV viewers could see blood soaking through his sock. Boston won the seventh game and went on to win the World Series. A’s fans would rather forget, but in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, the Dodgers’ Kirk Gibson, who had a torn hamstring in his right leg, ligament problems in his left knee and could hardly walk, came out to pinch hit in the ninth inning against Dennis Eckersley. With the Athletics hanging on to a 4-3 lead. Gibson guessed right on a 3-2 slider, leaned over and hit a two-run walk-off homer which fired up the Dodgers for the rest of the Series, which they won, four games to one. Not to discount any of those amazing performances, but some baseball heroics have been much more long-term. Baseball may not be a contact sport like football. But to go out there day-after-day, year-after-year over the course of a 162-game season is no small feat. All baseball players play through injuries of some sort, even when they are not as visible as Schilling’s bleeding tendon or Scherzer’s broken nose. Known as the “Iron Horse,” Yankee legend Lou Gehrig played in 2,130 consecutive games over a 15-year period before he was diagnosed with ALS, now commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. His farewell speech was one of the most heart-wrenching yet most amazing moments in baseball history. Cal Ripken Jr. eclipsed Gehrig’s record on September 6, 1995, when he played in his 2,131st consecutive game. For good measure, he hit a deep home run to left field during that game. He went on to play a total of 2,632 consecutive games. Other baseball heroes played through intense mental pressure. In the case of Roger Maris, it came through the media and the baseball establishment in 1961, when he broke Babe Ruth’s single-season home run record, belting his 61st on the final day of the season. Maris was a relative newcomer to the Yankees and shy, and the media wanted the popular Mickey Mantle to break the record. And he might have. Mantle had 54 home runs heading into September but injured his hip. In July, when it became obvious that either Mantle or Maris or both might hit more than 60 home runs, baseball commissioner Ford Frick, a pal of Babe Ruth, announced that he wouldn’t consider the record broken unless the player did it in 154 games, the length of the season in Ruth’s era. Major League Baseball, due to expansion, began the 162-game season in 1961. So as far as MLB was concerned, there were two records — Ruth for the 154-game season and Maris for the 162-game one. Finally, In 1991, six years after Maris had died of cancer, an MLB committee voted to remove the distinction and award the record fully to Maris. The pressure on Maris caused him to lose great clumps of hair and chain-smoke as he chased the Babe’s record. But he let nothing deter him. It was a magical season for those, like me, who lived in the New York area at the time. Just as difficult, if not more so, was what Hank Aaron endured en route to breaking Ruth’s career home record of 714 in 1974. Aaron had ended the previous season at 713 home runs. All winter he received hate mail and death threats, just because he was a black man trying to break Ruth’s record. Not only was the Babe white, but he was considered the greatest player of all time. Hammerin’ Hank let nothing stand in his way, hitting home run number 715 off the Dodgers’ Al Downing on April 8 in front of a sellout crowd of 53,775 at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium. Here’s what Mantle said about Aaron: “As far as I’m concerned, Aaron is the best ball player of my era. He is to baseball of the last 15 years what Joe DiMaggio was before him. He’s never received the credit he’s due.” In breaking baseball’s color barrier, Jackie Robinson, a fiery competitor, had to control his emotions, especially in his first year, 1947, and avoid fighting back on the field when opponents threw at him or tried to spike him. He had to brave constant threats and mass taunts from fans, even opposition from his own Brooklyn Dodger teammates until shortstop Pee Wee Reese led by example in accepting Jackie. Robinson won Rookie of the Year that year. To perform at the level under that intense pressure and scrutiny was incredibly courageous. His number 42 is retired throughout baseball. Scherzer, Schilling and Gibson did amazing things in playing through their injuries in those heroic games. But how about Jim Abbott, who played every game with a congenital defect? Born without a right hand, he pressed on toward his dream of playing major league baseball. Abbott would lay his glove on his right forearm, throw the pitch and then put the glove on his left hand in time to field any ball hit or bunted his way. Selected in the first round of the 1988 MLB draft by the California Angels, Abbott was in the big leagues the following year. He played ten seasons and won 87 games, including a no-hitter with the New York Yankees in 1993. All different kind of baseball heroes, but heroes just the same.
25 Jun 19
Rethinking Life

I’m reading, DIALOGUES WITH MARCEL DUCHAMP, by Pierre Cabanne.  I always look at any photographs included in art books first.  I can never wait to see them.  Anyway, there is Duchamp with his brothers, with other people, and alone. I keep looking at the people in the grainy, black and white photographs, and all I […]

25 Jun 19
debexpert

WeBank to contribute the Federated AI Enabler framework to the Linux Foundation and establish neutral community to oversee development Shanghai – June 25, 2019 – KubeCon + CloudNativeCon – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the FATE (Federated AI Technology Enabler). It is a […]

25 Jun 19
Sport Archives

Marcus Stroman would not come out and said he wanted to stand with the Yankees. After all, he spent his career in the East AL with the Blue Jays. But there was no doubt that the right person would take the opportunity to return to New York to play in The Bronx, and the rebuilding […]

25 Jun 19
Will Van Dam

For many people if you were to ask them were country music started or was created they would probably 100% say that Nashville, Tennessee is the birth place for country music. Sadly as correct as that answer sounds it is false. Country music was actually born in Bristol, Tennessee on the broader of Tennessee and […]

25 Jun 19
Ami Worthen

Allow me to introduce Garnet Prose + Projects, the new name of my business, which encompasses copywriting, communications, and project management. You can now go to garnetpro.com for an overview of services I offer, my professional background, etc. Building a separate home for my “for hire” work means I can dedicate this platform (amiworthen.com) to my […]

25 Jun 19
Nouvelles Du Monde

Marcus Stroman n’aurait pas voulu sortir pour dire qu’il voulait lancer pour les Yankees. Après tout, il a passé sa carrière dans l’AL East avec les Blue Jays. Mais il ne faisait aucun doute que le droitier saisirait l’opportunité de retourner à New York pour jouer dans le Bronx, les Blue Jays reconstruisant et Stroman […]

25 Jun 19
Calgary Herald

During the last World Petroleum Congress held in Calgary, I sat down with the chief executive of BP and talked about Canadian pipeline challenges. The more things change, the more they stay the same. The issue was a proposal to bring natural gas from the Mackenzie Delta, Beaufort Sea and Alaska down south, through Canada, […]

25 Jun 19
SlashGear

“How can front cameras evolve when the full screen era comes?” That is the question that OPPO asked no one in particular over on Weibo. Over the years, it has tried different ways of answering that, from rotating cameras to elevating ones. This week, the Chinese OEM is going to attempt what is probably the […]

25 Jun 19
Australian Financial News

IOOF Holdings has appointed Renato Mota as chief executive nearly seven months after he stepped into the role on an interim basis amid a management clearout following the financial services royal commission. The troubled wealth manager, which was one of the more notable firms dragged over the coals at the inquiry, says Mr Mota would […]

25 Jun 19
News Directory

Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last SlideNext Slide ERIE, Pennsylvania. – In considered giving Detroit Tigers prospect Ethan DeCaster a little test. “Close your eyes,” I wanted to say. “OK. Tell me what city you are in? What team are you on? ” But I chickened out. Because what if he got it wrong? What […]

25 Jun 19
BunnyGaming.com

Asmodee Digital, a leader in digital board game entertainment, is proud to announce the release of CATAN, the most influential modern board game created by Klaus Teuber, on Nintendo Switch The game has been developed in cooperation with United Soft Media (USM), publisher of multiple digital CATAN games. CATAN takes full advantage of the Nintendo […]