Newsletter

15 Feb 19
Adl Health

It is rather easier to feel positive when everything goes well, but real positive thinking is revealed when you can maintain its difficult times. It is then that you need it most. In difficult times, when there are problems and the economic condition is tough, it is so easy to get into negative thinking and […]

15 Feb 19
Angeli del suolo

It’s been a year! Time then to look back on what we have done in 2018 and plan for 2019. The ESG’s online General Meeting (only in Italian) will take place on the weekend of 23 and 24 February. Documents for discussion will be sent to all participants during February and, following the final discussions […]

15 Feb 19
Angeli del suolo

The December 2017 newsletter included an article that showed how the concept of the soil as a common good can be made into a reality. The article focused on the case of Mondeggi, where a group of citizens opposed the sale of a villa and land belonging to the Province (now Metropolitan City) of Florence. […]

15 Feb 19
Angeli del suolo

1.EXPERIENCES: Mondeggi is not for sale, we will cultivate and protect it! 2.NEWS FROM THE SIP FORUM: SIP Forum: Online meeting of the European Soil Group (ESG) The European Dimension: FoodDrinkEurope 3.NEWS ABOUT THE SOIL AND EUROPEAN INSTITUTIONS: We must ally with our soils! 4.WE ARE NOT ALONE: The experiences of other European States: SENCKENBERG […]

15 Feb 19
GoldDerby
“It’s a wild dream come true,” admits Yalitza Aparicio when asked about her Oscar nomination for “Roma.” The cinematic newcomer “never thought of acting” as a career before being cast as the central character in Alfonso Cuaron‘s intimate drama. Watch our exclusive video interview with Aparicio above. Aparicio stars in the film as Cleo, a maid working for a middle-class family in Mexico City during the 1970s. Cuaron based the film largely on his own experiences, creating Cleo as a version of his real-life caregiver. SEE Marina de Tavira Interview: ‘Roma’ Aparicio went to the audition — which was held in the small Oaxaca, Mexico, town where she grew up — almost by accident. She recalls, “I went with my sister,” who had responded to an open casting call. Though she’s not quite sure why the director chose to entrust the lead role to her, she believes it had to do with the similarities between her and the character, a nanny who dearly “loves” the four children in her care. Her acting debut was especially unique considering she never saw a finished script. “In the beginning, I thought this was normal,” she explains. “But it actually ended up helping, not having a script and shooting in chronological order, because I naturally learned about my character.” SEE Gabriela Rodriguez Interview: ‘Roma’ In addition to her Oscar nomination, Aparicio also competed at the Critics’ Choice Awards, where “Roma” won prizes for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Cinematography and Best Foreign Language Film. It repeated those victories at the BAFTAs, and it won additional awards for Best Director and Best Foreign Film at the Golden Globes. At the Oscars, “Roma” is tied with “The Favourite” as the most nominated film with 10 bids. It competes for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress (Marina de Tavira), Best Original Screenplay and more. If it wins Best Picture it will be the first foreign-language film and the first streaming film to win. And if Aparicio prevails she will be the first Latin-American woman to win Best Actress. PREDICT the Oscar winners now; change them until February 24 Be sure to check out how our experts rank this year’s Oscar contenders. Then take a look at the most up-to-date combined odds before you make your own 2019 Oscar predictions. Don’t be afraid to jump in now since you can keep changing your predictions until just before winners are announced on February 24. SIGN UP for Gold Derby’s free newsletter with latest predictions
15 Feb 19
The Undefeated
The legal battle between the National Football League and Colin Kaepernick is finally over. On Friday, Kaepernick’s lawyer and the league released a joint statement that the two sides, which also included Carolina Panthers safety Eric Reid, “have decided to resolve the pending grievances” stemming from a collusion lawsuit the two players brought against the league and its owners in October 2017. The statement ended by acknowledging a “confidentiality agreement” between the two parties, which means it will likely never be publicized what proof Kaepernick had against the league or what monetary amount he was awarded for dropping the grievance. Despite the specifics, the settlement also may mean Kaepernick, just 31 years old, won’t play another down in the NFL. And if that’s the result, it’s completely fine. Starting with him kneeling during the national anthem in August 2016 in protest of racial inequality and police violence, Kaepernick has sparked change not only in the NFL, but across the country, something neither an MVP campaign nor a Super Bowl championship could have accomplished. (For reference, 2018 MVP Patrick Mahomes’ name has barely been mentioned since he won the award on Feb. 2.) In just 2½ years, Kaepernick has done more for the national discussion on race and police accountability than any research article or presidential task force. Related Story Kaepernick rarely speaks but still dominates every NFL conversation Read now He’s donated more than $1.1 million, nearly 10 percent of the last salary he drew as a starting NFL quarterback, to social justice organizations dedicated to combating police brutality, mass incarceration, child hunger and homelessness. That’s a number that doesn’t include the record $89 million deal a group of NFL players struck with the league in November 2017 that helps fund organizations that address criminal and education reform and police accountability. As maligned as the Players Coalition agreement has been, that money never materializes without Kaepernick. One knee forced nearly every segment of society to confront the plight of African-Americans, whether they wanted to or not. From professional leagues to youth leagues, school departments to police departments to the armed forces, it felt like everyone was asked their thoughts on that guy with the Afro kneeling during the national anthem. The racial injustices he was fighting against escaped the confines of ESPN and other sportscentric mediums. Those spaces that normally could avoid acknowledging the presence of racial discrimination and race-based violence (Jimmy Kimmel Live!, the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, various universities and colleges) could no longer do so. Just last week, a 10-year-old white boy in North Carolina kneeled while the rest of his Cub Scout troop recited the Pledge of Allegiance at city hall because he wanted to take a knee “against racial discrimination … which is basically [when] people are mean to other people of different colors.” That boy could have grown up in a “colorblind” society had it not been for Kaepernick. [boxout id=”159708″] Even the Super Bowl halftime show, normally an apolitical display of pomp and circumstance, became a referendum of what it means to be an ally, or in the case of Travis Scott, a “sellout.” In his two years away from the sport, Kaepernick became bigger than any American professional athlete not named LeBron James. Despite his self-imposed silence, any nugget of information about him — a workout in Houston! An innocuous award ceremony! An ad campaign for a shoe brand — would grind the news cycle to a complete halt. Even with an apparent consensus of Kaepernick fatigue as the months rolled on and more subpar quarterbacks signed with teams, and calls for everyone to just “stick to sports,” Kaepernick resonated. He had one of the highest-selling jerseys as a free agent. His Nike ad in September led to 3.4 million mentions of the shoe company on Twitter and helped bump its stock up by more than 6 percent. [newsletter-twtw] Kaepernick is, like Muhammad Ali said of himself to Life magazine during his 43-month exile from professional boxing in the late 1960s, “Bigger than ever. … As big as all history.” The heavyweight champion, heavily criticized in his time for standing up for his morals, said he was still happy despite being stripped of his title and boxing license for protesting the Vietnam War “cause I’m free. I’ve made the stand all black people are gonna have to make sooner or later — whether or not they can stand up to the master.” Kaepernick, as did Ali at the time, lost his battle against the sport he played for. But he stood up to a multibillion-dollar organization and, for all intents and purpose, won. Kaepernick is now free.
15 Feb 19
CryptoCenterNews

LiteCoin Ultra (CURRENCY:LTCU) traded down 13.9% against the U.S. dollar during the 1-day period ending at 17:00 PM ET on February 15th. Over the last seven days, LiteCoin Ultra has traded 8.2% higher against the U.S. dollar. LiteCoin Ultra has a total market cap of $4,296.00 and approximately $0.00 worth of LiteCoin Ultra was traded […]

15 Feb 19
Silicon Valley
California’s governor believes the state’s residents should be compensated for their personal data, which has enriched Facebook, Google and other companies that call the state home. “California’s consumers should also be able to share in the wealth that is created from their data,” Gavin Newsom said in his first state of the state address this week. The governor said he has directed his staff to draft a proposal for a “data dividend,” an idea that has been championed by academics, advocacy groups and people such as Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook. In an op-ed in the Guardian last year, Hughes compared the value of data to the value of labor. He also cited Alaska’s Permanent Fund Dividend, which distributes an equal portion of a tax on oil companies among all the state’s residents, as a possible model for a data dividend. Details for a data dividend for Californians are still scarce, including which companies would be taxed and what data would be included. The governor’s team is working with legislators and national experts on the issue, said Jesse Melgar, a spokesman for Newsom’s office, Friday. One group that’s working with Newsom’s office is Common Sense, which advocates for children and families on media and technology issues and helped pass California’s first-in-the-nation digital privacy law last year. Common Sense CEO James Steyer said Friday that the San Francisco-based nonprofit is talking with Newsom’s office, legislators, tech experts and economists as it prepares to back the introduction of legislation for a data dividend. “It’s not a minor concept,” Steyer said, adding that it could have national and global implications and that he was “heartened” the governor is taking up the idea. While he couldn’t yet share specifics of legislation he said will be introduced in the next week or two — or the lawmakers involved — Steyer said it has two main elements: the idea that consumers own their data and how it’s used should be transparent, and creating a mechanism for monetization of that data. How much is consumer data worth? One measure policymakers might consider is quarterly revenue divided by the number of monthly active users of companies like Facebook and Twitter. In the fourth quarter of 2018, Facebook reported $16.91 billion in sales, so each of Facebook’s 2.32 billion monthly active users was worth $7.35. Twitter’s revenue for the quarter was $909 million, so that works out to $2.83 for each of its 321 million monthly active users. “We should not be sanctioning the trade-off of a person’s privacy for a fistful of dollars or a handful of pennies,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of Washington-based consumer advocacy group Center for Digital Democracy, on Friday. “There’s no way really to easily identify a dollar amount about what you’re worth online,” he added. “The system is far-reaching, and it’s influenced and compounded by a multiplier effect.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Chester said regulation is what’s needed to address the privacy and security issues surrounding the use of consumers’ data. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=gmsv” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /]
15 Feb 19
East Bay Times
California’s governor believes the state’s residents should be compensated for their personal data, which has enriched Facebook, Google and other companies that call the state home. “California’s consumers should also be able to share in the wealth that is created from their data,” Gavin Newsom said in his first state of the state address this week. The governor said he has directed his staff to draft a proposal for a “data dividend,” an idea that has been championed by academics, advocacy groups and people such as Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook. In an op-ed in the Guardian last year, Hughes compared the value of data to the value of labor. He also cited Alaska’s Permanent Fund Dividend, which distributes an equal portion of a tax on oil companies among all the state’s residents, as a possible model for a data dividend. Details for a data dividend for Californians are still scarce, including which companies would be taxed and what data would be included. The governor’s team is working with legislators and national experts on the issue, said Jesse Melgar, a spokesman for Newsom’s office, Friday. One group that’s working with Newsom’s office is Common Sense, which advocates for children and families on media and technology issues and helped pass California’s first-in-the-nation digital privacy law last year. Common Sense CEO James Steyer said Friday that the San Francisco-based nonprofit is talking with Newsom’s office, legislators, tech experts and economists as it prepares to back the introduction of legislation for a data dividend. “It’s not a minor concept,” Steyer said, adding that it could have national and global implications and that he was “heartened” the governor is taking up the idea. While he couldn’t yet share specifics of legislation he said will be introduced in the next week or two — or the lawmakers involved — Steyer said it has two main elements: the idea that consumers own their data and how it’s used should be transparent, and creating a mechanism for monetization of that data. How much is consumer data worth? One measure policymakers might consider is quarterly revenue divided by the number of monthly active users of companies like Facebook and Twitter. In the fourth quarter of 2018, Facebook reported $16.91 billion in sales, so each of Facebook’s 2.32 billion monthly active users was worth $7.35. Twitter’s revenue for the quarter was $909 million, so that works out to $2.83 for each of its 321 million monthly active users. “We should not be sanctioning the trade-off of a person’s privacy for a fistful of dollars or a handful of pennies,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of Washington-based consumer advocacy group Center for Digital Democracy, on Friday. “There’s no way really to easily identify a dollar amount about what you’re worth online,” he added. “The system is far-reaching, and it’s influenced and compounded by a multiplier effect.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Chester said regulation is what’s needed to address the privacy and security issues surrounding the use of consumers’ data. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=gmsv” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /]
15 Feb 19
The Mercury News
California’s governor believes the state’s residents should be compensated for their personal data, which has enriched Facebook, Google and other companies that call the state home. “California’s consumers should also be able to share in the wealth that is created from their data,” Gavin Newsom said in his first state of the state address this week. The governor said he has directed his staff to draft a proposal for a “data dividend,” an idea that has been championed by academics, advocacy groups and people such as Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook. In an op-ed in the Guardian last year, Hughes compared the value of data to the value of labor. He also cited Alaska’s Permanent Fund Dividend, which distributes an equal portion of a tax on oil companies among all the state’s residents, as a possible model for a data dividend. Details for a data dividend for Californians are still scarce, including which companies would be taxed and what data would be included. The governor’s team is working with legislators and national experts on the issue, said Jesse Melgar, a spokesman for Newsom’s office, Friday. One group that’s working with Newsom’s office is Common Sense, which advocates for children and families on media and technology issues and helped pass California’s first-in-the-nation digital privacy law last year. Common Sense CEO James Steyer said Friday that the San Francisco-based nonprofit is talking with Newsom’s office, legislators, tech experts and economists as it prepares to back the introduction of legislation for a data dividend. “It’s not a minor concept,” Steyer said, adding that it could have national and global implications and that he was “heartened” the governor is taking up the idea. While he couldn’t yet share specifics of legislation he said will be introduced in the next week or two — or the lawmakers involved — Steyer said it has two main elements: the idea that consumers own their data and how it’s used should be transparent, and creating a mechanism for monetization of that data. How much is consumer data worth? One measure policymakers might consider is quarterly revenue divided by the number of monthly active users of companies like Facebook and Twitter. In the fourth quarter of 2018, Facebook reported $16.91 billion in sales, so each of Facebook’s 2.32 billion monthly active users was worth $7.35. Twitter’s revenue for the quarter was $909 million, so that works out to $2.83 for each of its 321 million monthly active users. “We should not be sanctioning the trade-off of a person’s privacy for a fistful of dollars or a handful of pennies,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of Washington-based consumer advocacy group Center for Digital Democracy, on Friday. “There’s no way really to easily identify a dollar amount about what you’re worth online,” he added. “The system is far-reaching, and it’s influenced and compounded by a multiplier effect.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Chester said regulation is what’s needed to address the privacy and security issues surrounding the use of consumers’ data. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=gmsv” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /]
15 Feb 19
Viral Topic Zone

$3.6 billion of President Donald Trump’s wall construction fund will come from unobligated military construction funds, or MILCON. | Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images President Donald Trump aims to build a border wall through creative use of an emergency military statute — a strategy that even the president acknowledges will invite immediate court challenges. The plan is […]

15 Feb 19
Rune Soup

How exhausting to consider that candidates are announcing their intention to run in the 2020 election and establishment war mongers are still making up stories about the last one. Consider investing in a hip flask as an act of self care. More alarmingly still is the self-evident intention on the part of the corporate centrists […]

15 Feb 19
News Archives Uk

Residents of Hull have spoken of their disgust to find red graffiti of the word "snail" smeared everywhere in their cars and garages. In recent days, a number of cars and garages have been sighted in the north of Hull with the day. Two people who live on Hall Road, but do not want to […]

15 Feb 19
Go News Viral

$3.6 billion of President Donald Trump’s wall construction fund will come from unobligated military construction funds, or MILCON. | Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images President Donald Trump aims to build a border wall through creative use of an emergency military statute — a strategy that even the president acknowledges will invite immediate court challenges. The plan is […]

15 Feb 19
Tnewst

“I was happy to voluntarily sit down with them,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said of her interview with the special counsel’s office. | Mark Wilson/Getty Images Mueller Investigation The details of the sit-down are not publicly known, but Mueller likely has interest in Sanders’ role crafting statements about the Trump team’s interactions […]