Nhl

22 Apr 19
News Trends & Tech

NHL player representatives sound off on playoff format           from USATODAY – Sports Top Stories http://bit.ly/2XwsinS

22 Apr 19
News Trends & Tech

NHL players divided on playoff format           from USATODAY – Sports Top Stories http://bit.ly/2IxR83q

22 Apr 19
PUCK YEAH!

Game highlights to follow The New Zealand Ice Blacks began their campaign at the IIHF Division 2B World Championship in convincing fashion with a 7-2 win over hosts Mexico tonight, making it New Zealand’s first win against their rivals on Mexican ice. 55 seconds into the game Mexico’s Santiago Sierra was called for slashing, starting […]

22 Apr 19
National Post

In an Associated Press and Canadian Press survey of player representatives from all 31 NHL teams, 48.4% favoured changing the current divisional playoff format. A selection of player responses: —- “In my opinion, I prefer the 1 plays 8 format. Divisions that are stronger have teams eliminated in the first round that should have a […]

22 Apr 19
National Post

Hockey players are conditioned to think that winning the Stanley Cup means going through the best teams to be the best team. That does not mean they are blind to some of the inequalities of the NHL’s current divisional playoff format. An Associated Press/Canadian Press survey of NHLPA representatives from all 31 teams shows that […]

22 Apr 19
Daily Democrat
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
Times-Standard
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
The Reporter
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
Red Bluff Daily News
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1646676-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1646676-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1646676-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1646676-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Golden Knights goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury (29) blocks a shot from the San Jose Sharks during the second period of Game 6 of an NHL Western Conference quarterfinal series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @csstevensphoto Golden Knights goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury (29) blocks a shot from the San Jose Sharks during the second period of Game 6 of an NHL Western Conference quarterfinal series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @csstevensphoto San Jose Sharks center Melker Karlsson (68) is pushed away by Golden Knights goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury (29) during the third period of Game 6 of an NHL Western Conference quarterfinal series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Sunday, April 21, 2019. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Left_Eye_Images /s19 attempts to turn the corner for a shot over Golden Knights defenseman Jon Merrill (15) and Golden Knights goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury (29) during the second period of Game 6 of an NHL Western Conference quarterfinal series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Sunday, April 21, 2019. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Left_Eye_Images For the first time in its short history, since entering the NHL as an expansion team last year and creating the implausible from what most believed the impossible, the Golden Knights on Tuesday night in San Jose will experience playoff hockey. The ultimate kind. The do-or-die kind for both teams on ice. It’s only about what exists above the shoulders now, which side between the Knights and Sharks own a higher degree of mental toughness. That’s it. That’s all. Bodies are weary. It has been a long and physical series. It’s all about the head now. San Jose on Sunday night avoided elimination for the second straight game in dramatic fashion, beating the Knights 2-1 in double overtime of Game 6 in this Western Conference quarterfinal before what ultimately became a despondent crowd of 18,458 at T-Mobile Arena, where by far the best game of this series played out. The Knights earned their share of playoff experience last season, claiming a Western Conference title and advancing to a Stanley Cup Final. But at no time was a series extended to a seventh game. At no time did they face the pressure of what will welcome them to SAP Center. Not even in a Cup final against Washington, a series that ended in five games because the Capitals were just that much deeper and better. “You know, it’s Game 7,” said Knights coach Gerard Gallant of what awaits Tuesday. “It’s Game 7 and both teams want to advance. I think it will be two teams grinding it out and trying to advance … Winner-take-all, Game 7. You get ready to play and forget about (Sunday). You have to move on and get ready for the next one.” And such becomes their greatest challenge: How to recover from a game where the most important of statistics suggested the Knights should already be preparing to host Colorado in Game 1 of a Western semifinal? How in the world do you get past having 30 more shots than your opponent, scoring just once and losing in double-overtime? The Knights can do so by playing a similar game to that of Sunday, as difficult a proposition as that might seem on the road with a season riding on the outcome. But they took 59 shots in Game 6, all of which were turned away except for a Jonathan Marchessault second-period backhand that sailed past Martin Jones, circa 2016. San Jose’s goalie is suddenly the one who led the Sharks to a Stanley Cup Final four years ago and not the one who has been routinely pulled against the Knights the past two seasons. The Knights need to solve him Tuesday, need a lot more odd-man rushes than they managed in Game 6, need to convert when such moments arise. They also need an even better version of Marc-Andre Fleury. Hertl goal soft He stopped 27-of-29 shots Sunday and some again were fantastic saves, but as much as the short-handed game-winner from Tomas Hertl at 11:17 of the second overtime was the fault of defenseman Shea Theodore for not being aggressive enough with this stick and allowing Hertl to spring free, it was absolutely a long enough shot that you would expect Fleury to deny. It was the first double-overtime short-handed goal in NHL playoff history. It was also a soft one that has to be stopped. “They get one little crack at it and sneak one by (Fleury),” Marchessault said. “It’s obviously disappointing. I think we should’ve won, but who cares? We’ve got to go to Game 7 and get it done over there.” It wasn’t a good hockey game Sunday. It was a great one. This is the San Jose, with Jones playing as he has the past two games, that most believed could win the Stanley Cup at season’s outset. This is that team, one the Knights now must defeat on the road to avoid breaking for the summer. Forget the legs. Forget the six games that preceded this moment. Do-or-die is about the head. Come late Tuesday night, we’ll know which side is tougher above the shoulders. The other side? Hello, vacation. More Golden Knights: Follow at reviewjournal.com/GoldenKnights and @HockeyinVegas on Twitter. Contact columnist Ed Graney at egraney@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-4618. He can be heard on “The Press Box,” ESPN Radio 100.9 FM and 1100 AM, from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Follow @edgraney on Twitter.
22 Apr 19
Paradise Post
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
East Bay Times
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”
22 Apr 19
The Mercury News
LAS VEGAS — Tomas Hertl figured he’d take a chance. Skating through the neutral zone after taking a pass from Marc-Edouard Vlasic while the Sharks were killing a penalty in the second overtime, Hertl carried the puck over the blue line, dusted it off and beat goalie Marc-Andre Fleury with a wrist shot on the short side from the top of the circle. “When I first get (the puck), I was already a little bit tired. I was thinking maybe just dump it in and change,” Hertl said. “But I saw a little bit of space. I just take a couple steps and try to shoot it. I don’t know if (Shea) Theodore if he just hit my puck maybe a little bit change (direction). “But you know, if you don’t try, you never know. So I tried it and somehow get through.” UNREAL (shorthanded) ENDING. pic.twitter.com/2dY7iAW3oh — Brodie Brazil (@BrodieNBCS) April 22, 2019 Hertl had expressed unbridled confidence after the Sharks’ win in Game 5 that he and his teammates would play again at SAP Center. Hertl, his teammates and coach Pete DeBoer thought it was going too far to call it a guarantee, but the belief was there despite having a huge mountain still to climb. The Sharks are almost all the way there now, as Hertl’s goal at the 11:17 mark of the second overtime and Martin Jones’ franchise playoff-record 58 saves gave the Sharks a 2-1 win in Game 6, leveled the series at three wins apiece and set up a decisive Game 7 on Tuesday in San Jose. “Well, Tomas wears his heart on his sleeve, and I don’t know how that rolled out, whether it was social media or whatever, but it was ridiculous,” DeBoer said of the supposed guarantee. “There was no guarantee made. It was an emotional guy with English as his second language, you know, just professing his confidence in our group. He did that and he delivered.” Takeaways from an unforgettable night at T-Mobile Arena. 1. Martin Jones was unreal, but so was his defense (mostly): The save total was historic. Jones’ record night eclipsed a 24-year-old franchise record for saves in a playoff game, held by Wade Flaherty, who made 56 in the Sharks’ 5-4 double overtime win over Calgary on May 19, 1995 in Game 7 of that first round series. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – APRIL 21: San Jose Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks for the puck against the Vegas Golden Knights in the second period of Game 6 of their NHL first round playoff series at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Sunday, April 21, 2019. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) Jones on Sunday made 10 saves in the first period, 16 in the second, 17 in the third and 15 through 31 minutes and 17 seconds of overtime. After coming into Sunday with a .866 save percentage in five games, including two games where he was pulled in favor of Aaron Dell, Jones now has a .906 save percentage this series. After all that, though, Jones was quick to credit the work of the skaters around him. The Golden Knights had just three chances off the rush for the game compared to the Sharks’ nine. The Sharks also did a fine job of getting sticks into passing lanes to thwart quality chances. Like our Sharks Facebook page for more San Jose Sharks news, commentary and conversation. “When we eliminate that stuff off the rush, odd-man rushes, it makes life a lot easier,” Jones said. “We did a good job keeping guys in front of us, in zone. They didn’t have a ton of point-blank looks. We did a good job around the net.” Still, Jones had to come huge when the game was on the line. In the third period, Reilly Smith one-timed a pass from Jon Merrill but was stopped by a sliding Jones. “Yeah, I think it was kind of a slow three-on-two,” Jones said. “:He made a pass across and I was able to get across. Just missed my five-hole, but I was just able to get across on that one.” “We knew Jones was on, you could feel it,” Sharks captain Joe Pavelski said. “When you’re looking at the scoreboard, the shots are saying what they are, but the Jones is moving and seeing the puck. “It wasn’t 2-on-1’s, breakaways, guys weren’t getting behind us. It was pretty tight in that group out there, blocked some shot and (hung) in there.” For complete Sharks coverage follow us on Flipboard. Even on Vegas’ lone goal, Jonathan Marchessault had to make a nice shot to lift it over Jones’ outstretched right pad. It was also the second straight game the line of Paul Stastny, Mark Stone and Max Pacioretty had been held off the scoresheet, after that trio had torched the Sharks for 23 points through four games. 2. The Sharks able to reset after the third period: The Golden Knights got better as regulation time continued and quite frankly the Sharks were probably a bit fortunate to get out the first 60 minutes with the game still tied. In between the third period and the first overtime, the Sharks were able to hit the reset button. At the start of the first overtime, they cleaned up some turnovers and started to get the puck deep in the Golden Knights zone and establish a forecheck. And the Sharks were living dangerously there for a while. “We talked going into the overtime that we wanted to get back on our toes and get back on the forecheck. I thought we did that,” DeBoer said. “I thought it was a gutsy effort on the road in a tough situation for our group. We’re still alive.” In between the first and second overtimes, Logan Couture said, “There’s 15 minutes between overtime periods, so there’s not much conversation. You do what you personally have to do. “The only thing that was really said was ‘stick with it, it’s coming. We feel good and we’re going to go out and score.’ And that was it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]3. The penalty kill improves: After allowing two power play goals in Game 5, the Sharks were 3-for-3 on the penalty kill Sunday. The Golden Knights had just two opportunities with the man advantage in regulation time and even then had just one shot on goal. Even before Hertl scored his shorthanded goal, the Sharks had not allowed a shot in the 31 seconds prior. The Sharks had three blocks on Golden Knights shots on power plays. “As you go through a series you get to know a team’s tendencies and you get to dial in on them a little, and I think Jones is a big part of that too,” DeBoer said. “Your goalie is always your best penalty killer.”