Niner

24 Apr 19
High Velocity Sport

Draft predictions for every team: Who’s trading up, who’s taking a QB https://es.pn/2IUOX9h Some teams are angling to move up. Even more are angling to move down. The 2019 NFL draft is almost here, and NFL Nation reporters are making one prediction for every team. Scan through all 32 teams by division, or jump ahead […]

24 Apr 19
For The Win

There’s a lot of talent coming out of Columbus this year, so we’re taking a look at where the top prospects are projected to be drafted.

24 Apr 19
Fan Index

There’s a lot of talent coming out of Columbus this year, so we’re taking a look at where the top prospects are projected to be drafted.

24 Apr 19
Site Title

PICK #1 CARDS SELECT KYLER MURRAY QB-Oklahoma PICK #2 NINERS SELECT NICK BOSA DE- Ohio State PICK #3 JETS SELECT JOSH ALLEN EDGE- Kentucky PICK #4 RAIDERS SELECT QUINNEN WILLIAMS DT- Bama PICK #5 BUCS SELECT RASHAN GARY DE-Michigan PICK #6 GIANTS SELECT DANIEL JONES QB- Duke PICK #7 JAGS SELECT ED OLIVER DT- Houston […]

24 Apr 19
maocreationblog

Working over night, oh you know, this shits tight. might leave a welt. Grab my beer, and jam to music, to make it right. Shit go smooth, like angelic, so have no fear nor fright. I just get in my groove, like damn, shit like water. light. Never hit that block, drink my beer and […]

24 Apr 19
exploreJeffersonPA.com

Your daily sports update.

24 Apr 19

 1. Arizona Cardinals: Kyler Murray, QB, Cardinals Murray is the pick, according to multiple sources. Personally, I’d build around Rosen, but if Kingsbury wants his guy, he should be able to convince the front office.    2. San Francisco 49ers: Nick Bosa, DE, Ohio State Edge is a desperate need for the Niners, and Bosa […]

24 Apr 19
Touchdown Wire

Draft disclaimer: any rumors we here this week are usually just rumors for smokescreen purposes, but let’s get to it anyways. There are some rumors out there — being attributed to only the most famous football person Sources — that that are saying the Cardinals are not going to draft Kyler Murray and they may […]

24 Apr 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-1921547-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1921547-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1921547-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1921547-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
Orange County Register
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-6770151-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6770151-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6770151-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6770151-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
Press Enterprise
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-1461558-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1461558-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1461558-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1461558-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
Daily Bulletin
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-1850894-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1850894-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1850894-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1850894-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
Redlands Daily Facts
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-1783289-5 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1783289-5 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1783289-5 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1783289-5 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
SCNG
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-1793730-6 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1793730-6 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1793730-6 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1793730-6 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
The Mercury News
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-6016297-7 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6016297-7 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6016297-7 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6016297-7 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”6013499″]The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
East Bay Times
There was no distress call from the pilot of the vintage aircraft to the control tower Monday, April 22, in the minutes between when the plane took off and when it crashed into a Norco prison yard, a review of radio traffic showed. But starting about 7 minutes after the N9MB Northrop Flying Wing took off Monday from Chino Airport’s 26-Right runway, there was no response to several calls of “Northrop niner-mike-bravo, Chino tower,” according to audio available Tuesday on the LiveATC.net website. The pilot, a 51-year-old-man, died when the restored plane, originally built in 1945 according to Federal Aviation Administration records, crashed into the yard of the California Rehabilitation Center. The pilot had not been fully identified as of Tuesday afternoon by the Riverside County Coroner’s Office. The bright-yellow plane, which was destroyed, was owned by the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino. It was the last remaining of the four Northrop N9M-series flying wings, with “pusher” prop engines. It had the serial number 04, according to FAA records. #gallery-6097759-8 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6097759-8 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6097759-8 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6097759-8 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CHP and Cal Fire investigate reports of a plane down near the prison in Norco. (Photo by Will Lester/The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop N9M Flying Wing, the only one of its kind, crashed into the prison yard at the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco on Monday, April 22, 2019. It flew over the Chino Air Show in this 2002 file photo. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) An N9M-B, also known as the Flying Wing, flew at the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino. (Photo by Stan Lim, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A Northrop YB-35 flying wing makes a flyby during media day at the 2016 LA County air show. (Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) The audio file begins at noon, and the plane was cleared for takeoff shortly after the two-minute mark. The first tower call to the plane without a response was at about the 9-1/2 minute mark, or a bit more than seven minutes after takeoff. The plane was reported down shortly after noon. “There was no hint from the pilot that something happened,” said Robert Katz, a Dallas-based commercial pilot and certified flight instructor who has been flying since 1981. “What we are hearing is perfectly routine, normal (radio) traffic, and we don’t hear any distress coming from the airplane.” https://scng-dash.digitalfirstmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/N9MB-KCNO-04.22.2019-1.wav The exchanges include clearance for takeoff, advisories about other aircraft in the area, and a reminder to the pilot to switch on the aircraft’s transponder  — none of that out of the ordinary, said Katz, who reviewed the audio. “Either something catastrophic happened on that airplane, or the pilot became incapacitated. That’s what I’m thinking, Katz said. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said one inmate got scratches from the incident, but no prisoners or staff were seriously hurt. The plane did not hit any buildings on the 98-acre medium-security prison, although some outdoor exercise equipment was damaged. A National Transportation and Safety Board inspector was at the scene of the crash Tuesday, a spokesman for the agency said. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Fatal plane crash in Norco prison yard involved one-of-a-kind plane from Chino The long-abandoned flying wing program kept alive by volunteers at Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The NTSB will examine the aircraft and the scene and work to remove it, said spokesman Keith Holloway. Investigators will also request maintenance records, the pilot’s flight and medical history, and gather witness accounts and radar data, he said. He said the crash area had been contained and there was no issue with working in the prison yard to gather evidence. The N9Ms were one-third scale test aircraft built during Northrop Aircraft’s efforts to develop a long-range heavy bomber based on the radical design during World War II and the early Cold War. By 1950, projects had been canceled for both a jet and an earlier prop version of the full-size bomber. The design was later incorporated in the Northrop B-2 Spirit “stealth” bomber developed for the Air Force in the late 1980s. The NMNB that crashed Monday was bought in the 1950s by Planes of Fame founder Edward T. Maloney. It was eventually restored with an estimated 20,000 hours of volunteer work over 13 years. The restored version of the craft first flew in 1994, and the museum said it had been flown several hundred hours since then. It was to have been one of the featured aircraft in the Planes of Fame Air Show in Chino on May 4 and 5. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Susan Fracol, who witnessed the crash Monday and said she knew the pilot, said the flight was a rehearsal for the air show. Museum director of marketing and development Harry Geier said Tuesday the air show would not be canceled. “We are all very saddened by the loss of the pilot,” he said by phone. He said plans were still being worked on when asked if there would be any kind of tribute.
24 Apr 19
INSANE SPORTS

 Kicker Gould Ditches Talks, Wants Off 49ers – San Francisco 49ers franchise kicker Robbie Gould says he has pulled the contract proposals he sent to the team and told the Niners that he will not negotiate or sign a long-term deal with them and wants to be traded. Gould said Tuesday that if he reports at all, […]