Obpo

24 May 18
San Diego Free Press

Recently – within the context of discussions over the City of San Diego’s plans to bring massive redevelopment to the Midway District on this site – there has been some serious disparagement of the 30 foot height limit, and it’s being blamed for everything from the housing crisis to the lack of affordability at the coast.

So, apparently it’s time, once again, to present some local history – the origins of the 30 foot height limit – and some of the good folks who made it happen. It all began back in the late 60s when beach residents began to rebel against a wave of unbridled development occurring at the coast.

18 May 18
OB Rag

Recently – within the context of discussions over the City of San Diego’s plans to bring massive redevelopment to the Midway District on this site – there has been some serious disparagement of the 30 foot height limit, and it’s being blamed for everything from the housing crisis to the lack of affordability at the coast.

So, apparently it’s time, once again, to present some local history – the origins of the 30 foot height limit – and some of the good folks who made it happen. It all began back in the late Sixties when beach residents began to rebel against a wave of unbridled development occurring at the coast.

08 May 18
Mad or Bad? Criminal Lunacy in Britain, 1800-1900

In 1888, Emma Aston was found insane after she strangled her two children, Bertie and Frank Aston, to death.[i] She was distraught after the children’s father stopped sending her money. Although she pretended to be married to him under the name Mrs Styles, she admitted after the murders, that her children were illegitimate.[ii] Her trial reveals […]

06 May 18
Mad or Bad? Criminal Lunacy in Britain, 1800-1900

In 1869 Adelaide Freedman poisoned and killed her daughter, but she was found not guilty on the grounds of insanity at her trial.[1] Such verdicts were not uncommon in this period for women who committed infanticide,[2] but it was not very common for poisonings because purchasing poison was often seen as a premeditated crime.[3] At […]

06 May 18
Mad or Bad? Criminal Lunacy in Britain, 1800-1900

In 1887 Annie Cherry murdered her child. She was found guilty but insane.[i] Her trial shows that Victorian understandings of motherhood and poverty sometimes influenced the outcome of trials in this period. It also highlights the mix of moral and physical causes of insanity which led women to commit infanticide. Motherhood was given a significant […]

06 May 18
Mad or Bad? Criminal Lunacy in Britain, 1800-1900

On 1 May 1893 Elizabeth Box, the 34 year-old wife of George Box, a gas stoker, murdered her five-week-old son, Henry. After the inquest, the coroner said that the ‘case was a very painful one, and by his advice the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder… and requested a strict inquiry into the state […]

15 Apr 18
Lucy Gibbs

In April 1854, George Vernon Hennan was tried at the Old Bailey for the wilful murder of Jane, his wife of thirteen years. The court transcript provides detailed information from several voices about the events leading up to the murder. Alongside this, it also provides information for a plausible reason why the jury came to […]

08 Apr 18
ExpatLit

On Friday I was reminded that I live in the publishing hub of the country when I had two different publishing events in my calendar on the same day. The first was a panel discussion on the Future of Publishing at Centennial College. The second was a Publishing Industry Meet Up at Imperial Pub, just […]