Orange

21 Apr 19
Hellurrrandom || Hellurrr!

In a bid to stand out as global citizens, we (I really mean me,  lol) decide to try a different cuisine than Chinese like we usually do. Today, we try out Lebanese at Salma’s. I don’t know if anyone else does this, but when I go to a place I’ve never tried before I just […]

21 Apr 19
4Dawg Night Trucking Blog

Last week, UnderDawg and I took the kids on a road trip. We were headed to Ormond Beach, FL to attend my brother’s wedding. First to Raleigh, NC to see my daughter Maison and her boyfriend, Devon, in their first apartment. I fell in LOVE with Raleigh! Their apartment is amazing and they are doing […]

21 Apr 19
Real News Reports-Start Your Day Here

here. Get Exclusive Analysis and Investing Ideas of Future Assets on Hacked.com. Join the community today and get up to $400 in discount by using the code: “CCN+Hacked”. Sign up here.By CCN: Tesla billionaire Elon Musk’s rocket company SpaceX suffered another setback when one of its Crew Dragon capsules encountered a mysterious “anomaly” during engine…

21 Apr 19
Bulldoggy

I am Stella, Queen of the Olde English Bulldogges. I am in a rolling box. I think we are going to see the lady in the white coat, the one Lady Human calls ‘vet’. Me:  No, we are not going to the vet. Stella:  Now I am really confused. Me:  As I told you, we […]

21 Apr 19
Nigella Eats Everything

Finally, Easter weekend has come and gone, and with it so has Lent, hooray! Back I joyously skip into the arms of temptation and bury my face in the next cream tea or jar of jam I see. Although, I have to confess, my absconding from sugar took a dramatic nose dive these final few […]

21 Apr 19
Sneaker News
Nike’s Air Force 1 Low is certainly no stranger to alternate methods of branded embellishment, and the latest style of the classic sneaker to release is a three-pack of sumptuously Swoosh-ed makeups. Arriving in a white/purple that gives off ever-so-slight PlayStation vibes, a summer-ready white/orange and a simple-yet-effective black/white, each pair uses a simple tumbled leather base and then accents it with a bold three-dimensional plastic Swoosh that’s secured by metallic silver trim. The tongue patch uses the same translucent material to lock in the accents, and each pair is then completed by a simple-yet-effective white midsole. Alongside the Beaverton Brand’s many jelly Swoosh and reflective Swoosh options, these Air Force 1s provide a compelling look that’s perfect for the summer, so check out all three pairs in detail below, and expect a Nike.com release in the coming weeks. Nike Air Force 1 Low Style Code: AO2441-101 Nike Air Force 1 Low Color: White/Orange Peel Style Code: AO2441-102 Nike Air Force 1 Low Color: Black/White-Black Style Code: AO2441-003
21 Apr 19
Bakes by Brown Sugar

Roasted Peach Bread Pudding – This bread pudding is one of my favorite desserts. The pudding is rich with cream and eggs, tart with the taste of peaches and the it is finished with salted caramel

21 Apr 19
csmoove33

On Friday the Lakers interviewed ex Cleveland Cavaliers coach and former Laker Tyronn Lue. Lakers GM, Rob Pelinka and Lue met in Orange County. Lue who coached the Cavs to 3 NBA Finals was fired after an 0-6 start to the 2018-19 season. Lue seems like a perfect fit for the Lakers seeing as he […]

21 Apr 19
Daily Democrat
Less than two years after Brian Elvir left the Marine Corps so he could help raise his daughter, he’s on track to become a nurse practitioner. The 27-year-old Tustin resident is finishing his second year of studies at Irvine Valley College, where he also works in the Veteran Resource Center helping other service members transition to civilian life and take advantage of a federal GI Bill that can help put them through college. But before he found his current path, Elvir was struggling. He was unknowingly suffering from symptoms of a brain injury he’d sustained during a training exercise in Kuwait. At one point — due to delays in accessing benefits due to him as a veteran — the Kentucky native considered living in his car. And the bracelet Elvir wears on his left wrist is a constant reminder that he’s still one of the lucky ones, the black band bearing the name of a friend who took his own life shortly after leaving the service. Veteran advocates say a few bits of legislation — such as requiring every branch of the U.S. military to enroll active-duty personnel in post-service benefits before they’re discharged and having a restructured Veterans Affairs administration proactively follow up on their care — could have helped Elvir, his friend and, literally, millions of others like them. But no such law is in on the books. And that, veterans and veterans advocates say, is par for the course. Virtually every politician in America, from every party, promises to help and support veterans while running for office. And many small-scale bills do come out of Washington and state legislatures. But advocates say big-picture legislation that could help vets better navigate their after-military lives rarely even gets proposed. “I think their hearts are in the right spot,” said Nancy Montgomery, a nurse who oversees Irvine Valley College’s Veteran Resource Center, when asked about how lawmakers fare on issues that might help veterans improve their daily lives. “But we’re not hitting the big things. We’re not hitting them at all.” Everybody’s issue #gallery-2579563-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2579563-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2579563-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2579563-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Marine Brian Elvir, standing outside the Veterans Resource Center at Irvine Valley College, shows a band he wears to remember a fellow veteran on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Irvine, CA. Elvir wears the band to remember his friend, Navy medic Sean Sullivan who killed himself in November 2017. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG) Marine Brian Elvir shares a laugh with Assistant Dean of Health, Wellness and Veterans, Nancy Montgomery at the Health and Wellness Center at the Veterans Resource Center at Irvine Valley College on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Irvine, CA. Elvir left the Marines two years ago to be with his baby daughter. He thought he might end up living in his car for a bit until he got a job at the Veteran Resource Center at Irvine Valley College. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG) Marine Brian Elvir waits for patients at the Health and Wellness Center at the Veterans Resource Center at Irvine Valley College on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Irvine, CA. Elvir left the Marines two years ago to be with his baby daughter. He thought he might end up living in his car for a bit until he got a job at the Veteran Resource Center at Irvine Valley College. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG) Veterans take advantage of the computer lab at the Veterans Resource Center at Irvine Valley College on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Irvine, CA. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG) Marine Brian Elvir outside the Veterans Resource Center at Irvine Valley College on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Irvine, CA. Elvir left the Marines two years ago to be with his baby daughter. He thought he might end up living in his car for a bit until he got a job at the Veteran Resource Center at Irvine Valley College. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG) Though many veterans thrive, as a group they face higher rates of homelessness, addiction, unemployment, suicide and disabilities than the general population. Nationally, combat veterans are considered the highest risk group in America to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, a condition that can sometimes lead to violence against others. The Department of Veterans Affairs estimated in 2009 that nearly one in three Vietnam-era veterans suffer from some form of PTSD, while 10 to 20 percent of the veterans of action in the Gulf War, Afghanistan and Iraq suffer PTSD. The issues are hardly unnoticed. Politicians frequently promise to help, pledging on the campaign trail to make the men and women who’ve served our country a top priority. And many — including U.S Rep. Katie Porter, D-Irvine, and State Sen. Tom Umberg, D-Santa Ana — call out promises to help veterans on their official websites after they take office. And, four months into the current legislative cycle, some representatives are trying to carry out those promises. No fewer than seven bills aimed at improving life for veterans, are making their way through Washington or Sacramento. But most of those bills are narrow. For example, a proposal from State Sen. Ling Ling Chang, R-Diamond Bar, would waive shelter fees so California veterans have easier access to service animals. Veterans and advocates applaud all good-faith efforts, saying every little bit helps. But they also argue some bills feel like low-hanging fruit, noting that major needs — such as a lack of transitional services and long waits through the VA — remain unaddressed. Some lawmakers agree. “We’re still not getting to a lot of veterans,” Rep. Lou Correa, D-Santa Ana, said in a phone interview from South Korea, where he was meeting this week with soldiers working in the demilitarized zone bordering North Korea. “They’re still falling though the cracks.” Correa, who has served in Orange County as a supervisor and in the state Assembly, sits on the Veterans Affairs Committee in the House of Representatives. He’s introduced bills this year to make the VA study medical marijuana as a treatment option, to help children of Armed Forces reserve members, and to finance child care for veterans going through rehabilitation. Meanwhile, local nonprofit and educational institutions keep fighting for funds to fill the gaps — particularly for the two million troops that have been deployed to the Middle East over the past decade. One of the key problems cited by veterans and supporters is that too often the Department of Defense discharges them without offering a clear idea of what services are available to them and how to access those services. “They don’t teach you half of the stuff you’re eligible for,” Elvir said. Stephen Peck, who was in the Marines and now serves as president of U.S.Vets, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that helps homeless and at-risk vets across the country, said many veterans have too much pride and are too conditioned to be self-sufficient to ask for help after they’re discharged. Combat veterans deployed after 1998, for example, can access healthcare benefits through the VA for five years after they’ve been discharged. But federal data shows less than two-thirds of the nearly 2 million veterans who’d become eligible for healthcare benefits since 2002 had enrolled to receive them by 2016 because they either didn’t know they could or didn’t know how to go about signing up. In California’s community college system, Montgomery said some 85 percent of veteran students didn’t know they were eligible for healthcare benefits through the VA and were either paying big premiums to get private insurance or going without insurance altogether. And she said many don’t learn about the free care available through the VA until medical complications tied to their service start to show up years later. Those gaps often leave them without the care they need during a window when they’re especially vulnerable to issues triggered by leaving their jobs, friends and identity as service members all behind at the same time. Giving veterans thorough physical exams, so they know what they’re dealing with, and then automatically enrolling them to receive VA healthcare before they’re discharged could help to thwart some of those problems, Peck said. It would also help to identify eligible veterans, since Peck said right now there’s a wall between the defense department and the VA due in part to health privacy concerns. That’s why, in 2016, Montgomery authored a resolution that would have required the defense department to enroll all departing service members to receive VA benefits. Montgomery approached lawmakers to introduce related legislation, but it never got off the ground. Similarly, veterans say they hear vague promises about GI Bill benefits before they’re discharged. But no one walks them through the process of signing up to access those benefits unless they pursue transitional services from an organization such as CalVet or temporarily funded college resource centers on their own. Even then, Elvir said he couldn’t get GI Bill benefits for nearly three months due to the way the school calendar fell. That’s when he had to dip deeply into his savings and was nearly forced to live in his car as he waited for funding to come through. And he knows people who’ve lost their benefits because they weren’t in approved programs or didn’t file the proper paperwork. Rep. Gil Cisneros, D-Yorba Linda, who’s a Navy veteran himself, recently introduced a bill that would help address one major gap in GI Bill benefits. The BREAK PAY for Veterans Act would require the VA to provide a housing allowance between school terms, which will ensure GI Bill beneficiaries continue to receive financial assistance during breaks up to eight weeks long. VA in need of overhaul But once veterans are enrolled to receive VA benefits, many say the waiting and headaches have only just begun. The VA has long been plagued by veteran complaints about lengthy waits for care, poor communication and more. Those issues came to a boiling point in 2014, when media began reporting on veterans who were dying while waiting for VA care. Investigations uncovered falsified records, and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki resigned. The agency got such a bad reputation that Peck said some veterans — and particularly young women — have avoided going there for help altogether. A study published in January in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests the situation had improved by 2017, with faster average wait times in VA than private facilities. But an investigation released in February by USA Today indicates many VA facilities have high incidents of preventable infections and severe bed sores. And it found a majority still have longer emergency room wait times, with Long Beach, Loma Linda and other California VA facilities among the worst 10 percent in the country for long waits. Elvir experienced these delays firsthand. About a year after he left the service, he had a seizure. He contacted the nearest VA health center, in Long Beach, where he was told he’d have to wait nearly a year to get seen by a specialist. Elvir told Montgomery, who promptly got on the phone with the VA. Within a week, Elvir was seen by a neurologist who told him the “concussion” he’d suffered a year earlier during a training accident in Kuwait had actually caused a traumatic brain injury, which had triggered his seizure. If Montgomery hadn’t been there to advocate for him, Elvir said he likely would have dropped out school, since his license was taken away following the seizure and he didn’t know how long he’d be waiting to get treatment. Elvir has played his good fortune forward, sending photos of the help sheets Irvine Valley College provides to other Marine Corps buddies who aren’t connected to support systems. That type of peer mentorship is great, Elvir said, but it shouldn’t be the only way many veterans are getting help. Correa wants to see the VA routinely check in with all discharged veterans to make sure they’re getting the care they need. The congressman said introducing legislation to mandate such welfare checks is a top priority for him this term.
21 Apr 19
elliotts on tour

Pre-Brexit EU tours don’t come any more complex than not knowing if I would ever be able to return to the UK again, cast adrift in a land of Croissants, Sauerkraut, Tapa and Pastel de Nata’s, not to mention the beers the wines and the Brandy, what would I do ! Leaving Chris behind with […]

21 Apr 19
David Meredith's photoblog.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Orange. I had quite a few ideas for this challenge, from orange Lichen on a tree trunk to orange race cars. I thought an orange sunrise or sunset was to obvious until I thought of this set of photos where the ice reflecting the blue sky above […]

21 Apr 19
Memories With The Mulkeys

I decided to hop on the bandwagon and try a charcoal teething whitener paste. As a few of you may know activated charcoal has many benefits from helping aid in weightloss, detoxing, heart heath, and GI track heath. I have tried charcoal lemonades and honestly been a huge fan of them so why not give […]

21 Apr 19
Meandering Morocco

Well, that first good night of sleep didn’t continue. Jetlag got me – up most of the night. Find coffee ! And I did plus a Nata ! Breakfast of champions. I did actually try to have a nice breakfast before heading out on my day trip but at 7:30am EVERYTHING is closed. The coffee […]