Oregon Scientific

25 Apr 19
Press Telegram
#gallery-2157986-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2157986-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2157986-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2157986-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (SCNG file photo) The unusual sea creatures blanketed the ocean surface several years ago, so thick you could barely see the water beneath them. And if the wind blows just right, the beautiful blue “by-the-wind sailors” might soon return to the Southern California shoreline. Todd Mansur, a fishing captain for Dana Wharf Sportfishing, was on an overnight charter at San Clemente Island this week, about 50 miles from the Dana Point coast, when he noticed the jelly-like creatures — their scientific name Velella velellas — known for living in more tropical waters off Baja California. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. “They are carpeting the surface … you could literally cut them with a knife,” he said. “It was like having lilies on a pond completely cover the water.” They were spotted on and off as close as 11 miles to the Orange County coastline. “You could go through an area where there’s just miles of them,” he said. Hundreds of thousands – perhaps millions – of Velella velellas washed ashore sporadically during the El Niño years from 2014 through 2016, from Orange County to the Oregon and Washington coast. Before that, they were reported in 2004 off of Ocean City, Wash. By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) This week, along with the Velella velellas there were about 100 sunfish, or Mola molas, 600-to 800-pound tropical sea creatures, feasting on them, Mansur said. “They are up on the surface, you could see them stick their mouths out of the water, eating them like butterflies — they are just mowing them down,” he said. Though by-the-wind sailors look like jellyfish because of their gelatinous nature, they are not, and they don’t have the sting associated with jellies. They do have venom, but the stings are unlikely to hurt humans. Beachgoers, however, are advised to avoid touching them because the stings sometimes result in a mild rash. A single creature is actually not just one organism, but rather polyps connected underneath a gelatinous blue sail. Once on the sand, the by-the-wind sailors gradually lose their blue color and the tissues disintegrate, leaving only the sail. They got their name because of that sail-like flap, which stands up straight atop their bodies and puts them at the mercy of the blowing wind. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mansur said he doesn’t believe their arrival is a sign of a new El Niño brewing, because the water is lingering in the chilly 58- to  60-degree range. Instead, he attributes their appearance to a healthy ocean ecosystem — “good, healthy currents that bring that trend of fish here,” he said. If strong onshore winds show up, as they have been in recent weeks, Southern California beachgoers soon could get an up-close look at the by-the-wind sailors. “It’s very likely you’ll see them on the beach,” Mansur said.
25 Apr 19
Orange County Register
#gallery-6771875-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6771875-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6771875-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6771875-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (SCNG file photo) The unusual sea creatures blanketed the ocean surface several years ago, so thick you could barely see the water beneath them. And if the wind blows just right, the beautiful blue “by-the-wind sailors” might soon return to the Southern California shoreline. Todd Mansur, a fishing captain for Dana Wharf Sportfishing, was on an overnight charter at San Clemente Island this week, about 50 miles from the Dana Point coast, when he noticed the jelly-like creatures — their scientific name Velella velellas — known for living in more tropical waters off Baja California. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. “They are carpeting the surface … you could literally cut them with a knife,” he said. “It was like having lilies on a pond completely cover the water.” They were spotted on and off as close as 11 miles to the Orange County coastline. “You could go through an area where there’s just miles of them,” he said. Hundreds of thousands – perhaps millions – of Velella velellas washed ashore sporadically during the El Niño years from 2014 through 2016, from Orange County to the Oregon and Washington coast. Before that, they were reported in 2004 off of Ocean City, Wash. By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) This week, along with the Velella velellas there were about 100 sunfish, or Mola molas, 600-to 800-pound tropical sea creatures, feasting on them, Mansur said. “They are up on the surface, you could see them stick their mouths out of the water, eating them like butterflies — they are just mowing them down,” he said. Though by-the-wind sailors look like jellyfish because of their gelatinous nature, they are not, and they don’t have the sting associated with jellies. They do have venom, but the stings are unlikely to hurt humans. Beachgoers, however, are advised to avoid touching them because the stings sometimes result in a mild rash. A single creature is actually not just one organism, but rather polyps connected underneath a gelatinous blue sail. Once on the sand, the by-the-wind sailors gradually lose their blue color and the tissues disintegrate, leaving only the sail. They got their name because of that sail-like flap, which stands up straight atop their bodies and puts them at the mercy of the blowing wind. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mansur said he doesn’t believe their arrival is a sign of a new El Niño brewing, because the water is lingering in the chilly 58- to  60-degree range. Instead, he attributes their appearance to a healthy ocean ecosystem — “good, healthy currents that bring that trend of fish here,” he said. If strong onshore winds show up, as they have been in recent weeks, Southern California beachgoers soon could get an up-close look at the by-the-wind sailors. “It’s very likely you’ll see them on the beach,” Mansur said.
25 Apr 19
Daily Breeze
#gallery-1787673-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1787673-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1787673-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1787673-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (SCNG file photo) The unusual sea creatures blanketed the ocean surface several years ago, so thick you could barely see the water beneath them. And if the wind blows just right, the beautiful blue “by-the-wind sailors” might soon return to the Southern California shoreline. Todd Mansur, a fishing captain for Dana Wharf Sportfishing, was on an overnight charter at San Clemente Island this week, about 50 miles from the Dana Point coast, when he noticed the jelly-like creatures — their scientific name Velella velellas — known for living in more tropical waters off Baja California. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. “They are carpeting the surface … you could literally cut them with a knife,” he said. “It was like having lilies on a pond completely cover the water.” They were spotted on and off as close as 11 miles to the Orange County coastline. “You could go through an area where there’s just miles of them,” he said. Hundreds of thousands – perhaps millions – of Velella velellas washed ashore sporadically during the El Niño years from 2014 through 2016, from Orange County to the Oregon and Washington coast. Before that, they were reported in 2004 off of Ocean City, Wash. By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) This week, along with the Velella velellas there were about 100 sunfish, or Mola molas, 600-to 800-pound tropical sea creatures, feasting on them, Mansur said. “They are up on the surface, you could see them stick their mouths out of the water, eating them like butterflies — they are just mowing them down,” he said. Though by-the-wind sailors look like jellyfish because of their gelatinous nature, they are not, and they don’t have the sting associated with jellies. They do have venom, but the stings are unlikely to hurt humans. Beachgoers, however, are advised to avoid touching them because the stings sometimes result in a mild rash. A single creature is actually not just one organism, but rather polyps connected underneath a gelatinous blue sail. Once on the sand, the by-the-wind sailors gradually lose their blue color and the tissues disintegrate, leaving only the sail. They got their name because of that sail-like flap, which stands up straight atop their bodies and puts them at the mercy of the blowing wind. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mansur said he doesn’t believe their arrival is a sign of a new El Niño brewing, because the water is lingering in the chilly 58- to  60-degree range. Instead, he attributes their appearance to a healthy ocean ecosystem — “good, healthy currents that bring that trend of fish here,” he said. If strong onshore winds show up, as they have been in recent weeks, Southern California beachgoers soon could get an up-close look at the by-the-wind sailors. “It’s very likely you’ll see them on the beach,” Mansur said.
25 Apr 19
SCNG
#gallery-1798032-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1798032-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1798032-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1798032-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (Photo courtesy of Todd Mansur/Dana Wharf Sportsfishing) By-the-wind sailors, or Velella velellas, blanketed the ocean near San Clemente Island and could be making their way toward Southern California’s coastline like they did a few years ago. (SCNG file photo) The unusual sea creatures blanketed the ocean surface several years ago, so thick you could barely see the water beneath them. And if the wind blows just right, the beautiful blue “by-the-wind sailors” might soon return to the Southern California shoreline. Todd Mansur, a fishing captain for Dana Wharf Sportfishing, was on an overnight charter at San Clemente Island this week, about 50 miles from the Dana Point coast, when he noticed the jelly-like creatures — their scientific name Velella velellas — known for living in more tropical waters off Baja California. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. “They are carpeting the surface … you could literally cut them with a knife,” he said. “It was like having lilies on a pond completely cover the water.” They were spotted on and off as close as 11 miles to the Orange County coastline. “You could go through an area where there’s just miles of them,” he said. Hundreds of thousands – perhaps millions – of Velella velellas washed ashore sporadically during the El Niño years from 2014 through 2016, from Orange County to the Oregon and Washington coast. Before that, they were reported in 2004 off of Ocean City, Wash. By-the-wind sailors came ashore with the tide along the beach at Ocean City, Wash., in 2004. (AP Photo/The Daily World, Kathy Quigg) This week, along with the Velella velellas there were about 100 sunfish, or Mola molas, 600-to 800-pound tropical sea creatures, feasting on them, Mansur said. “They are up on the surface, you could see them stick their mouths out of the water, eating them like butterflies — they are just mowing them down,” he said. Though by-the-wind sailors look like jellyfish because of their gelatinous nature, they are not, and they don’t have the sting associated with jellies. They do have venom, but the stings are unlikely to hurt humans. Beachgoers, however, are advised to avoid touching them because the stings sometimes result in a mild rash. A single creature is actually not just one organism, but rather polyps connected underneath a gelatinous blue sail. Once on the sand, the by-the-wind sailors gradually lose their blue color and the tissues disintegrate, leaving only the sail. They got their name because of that sail-like flap, which stands up straight atop their bodies and puts them at the mercy of the blowing wind. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mansur said he doesn’t believe their arrival is a sign of a new El Niño brewing, because the water is lingering in the chilly 58- to  60-degree range. Instead, he attributes their appearance to a healthy ocean ecosystem — “good, healthy currents that bring that trend of fish here,” he said. If strong onshore winds show up, as they have been in recent weeks, Southern California beachgoers soon could get an up-close look at the by-the-wind sailors. “It’s very likely you’ll see them on the beach,” Mansur said.
25 Apr 19
ThinkProgress
People across the United States are breathing increasingly polluted air, according to the American Lung Association’s annual State of the Air report. Climate change is a major contributor to worsening air quality, and the Trump administration’s ongoing efforts to roll back environmental protections could make it even worse. The American Lung Association has been tracking air quality for two decades, and the air pollution increase found in this year’s report is worse than the past two reports, which examined air quality dating back to 2013. This runs counter to repeated claims made by President Donald Trump in which he’s stated, “I want crystal-clean air,” and asserted that the U.S. has “record clean” air. Between 2015 and 2017, more than 141 million people — one in four Americans — were exposed to dangerous particle pollution and unhealthy ozone levels, also known as soot and smog. This represents an increase of 7.2 million more people compared to last year’s report. “In many areas of the United States, the air quality is worsening, at least in part because of wildfires and weather patterns fueled by climate change,” Harold Wimmer, president and chief executive of the American Lung Association, said in a statement. “This increase in unhealthy air is eye-opening, and points to the reality that the nation must do more to protect the public from serious, even life-threatening harm,” Wimmer continued. “There is no clearer sign that we are facing new challenges than air pollution levels that have broken records tracked for the past twenty years, and the fact that we had more days than ever before when monitored air quality reached hazardous levels for anyone to breathe.” Smog has worsened with climate change, the report notes. All three years examined in this report were the warmest years ever recorded, and as temperatures increase, ozone pollution forms more easily and is harder to clear away. Described by the American Lung Association as “essentially causing a sunburn of the lungs,” health impacts include shortness of breath, coughing, and asthma attacks. Particle pollution is often the result of burning coal, and when the microscopic particles are lodged deep in the lungs, they can enter the bloodstream and cause health impacts such as heart attack, stroke, and cancer. According to the report, more cities are experiencing days with short-term spikes in this type of pollution. Of the 25 most polluted cities identified by the American Lung Association, eight have now reached their highest number of days with these short spikes occurring for the first time in the association’s 20 years producing these air quality reports. This includes cities in California, Alaska, Utah, Montana, and Washington, many of which are grappling with increasingly intense and destructive wildfires. Many cities — in California, as well as West Virginia, Alaska, Ohio, and Oregon — have also experienced worsened year-long particle pollution. The report’s findings come in stark contrast to repeated claims made by Trump, going back as far as his campaign trail in 2015 when he said, “You want to have clean air. You want to have clean water. That’s very important to me, and I’ve won many environmental awards. I am not a believer in climate change.” Then after being elected, he pledged in his 2017 State of the Union address to “promote clean air and water.” This mantra continued into 2018. That September, he defended his decision to have the United States withdraw from the Paris climate agreement by stating, “we have the cleanest air now in the world. We have the cleanest water. Remember this. I’m an environmentalist. I want crystal-clean water. I want crystal-clean air.” He echoed this refrain in a November interview with the Washington Post, during which he said, “You look at our air and our water, and it’s right now at a record clean.” Black and Latinx Americans suffer more from dirty air but the EPA is charging ahead with rollbacks These claims, however, run contrary to the anti-environment, deregulatory agenda pursued so far by the Trump administration. “Unfortunately, this Administration has focused on steps to roll back or create loopholes in core healthy air protections put in place to comply with the Clean Air Act,” the American Lung Association report states. “Not only has this Administration targeted specific Clean Air Act safeguards for rollbacks, it has also sought to weaken the scientific review and undermine the basis for current and future protections.” Among the rollbacks highlighted by the report is the repeal of the Clean Power Plan, which sought to reduce carbon emissions from coal plants, removing limits on methane emissions from oil and gas operations, and attempts to weaken the Clean Air Act. This includes targeting mercury and air toxics standards, or MATS — a 2011 set of federal rules under the Clean Air Act designed to reign in the pollution from plants that burn coal and oil. Under Administrator Andrew Wheeler, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has sought to limit the use of public health data in regulating power plant emissions, a move that essentially guts MATS. Meanwhile, the EPA has also warred with California over the state’s stricter vehicle emissions standards. Trump has also repeatedly sought to cut the EPA’s budget. Under the 2020 federal budget proposed by the president earlier this year, the EPA would take a 31 percent cut in funding, with pollution prevention programs among those slated for elimination. In its conclusions, the American Lung Association emphasized that “more must be done to address climate change” and that the Clean Air Act “must remain intact and enforced.” However, it warned that this might not be likely due to actions taken by this administration. As a result, decades of improvements in air quality, it states, is now “threatened.”
25 Apr 19
lifebiomedguru

YESTERDAY IN OREGON, I gave testimony, registered as neither for nor against, to educate the Ways and Means Committee on scientific facts relevant one of the most draconian bills conceived (HB3063). Oregon has classically been among the most politically diverse and yet tolerant society among all of the US States.  The aim of the bill […]

25 Apr 19
Burst Updates

WT: “Four conservation groups have asked a judge to block a Trump administration plan allowing drilling, mining and other activities in seven Western states they say will harm sage grouse.” “Western Watersheds Project and other groups asked for the injunction in U.S. District Court in Idaho late last week for Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, […]

25 Apr 19
Alien Octopus

Cliff Kapono. All photos by Ellis At the intersection of modern science and Hawaiian tradition, Cliff Kapono is uniquely poised to affect positive change along his home coastlines and beyond I was sitting on my board at the opening of a river mouth just outside Hil, Hawaii, getting jostled in cloudy, brackish water by sizable […]

25 Apr 19
Frequent Miler

Travel Mileage/Points Increases Merchant Best Rate on 04/25/2019 Best Rate on04/24/2019 BeenVerified, Inc. 1000 mi. Best Rate History BlueGrace Logistics 2500 mi. Best Rate History Dell Outlet 6 (2) mi./$ 4 (1) mi./$ Best Rate History Harry & David 9 (3) mi./$ 4 (3) mi./$ Best Rate History Monica Vinader 7 pt./$ 4 pt./$ Best […]

25 Apr 19
Literary Hub

The idea of a single day devoted to the earth is absurd. In the 49 years since the first Earth Day was celebrated, human civilization—checked by neither morality nor policy—has wrecked devastation upon the planet, increasing with each passing year of excess and inaction the likelihood that coming generations will live in a world unrecognizable […]

25 Apr 19
PUGET SOUND PHILOSOPHY

Brian Kim ’21, a double major in Philosophy and Economics with a minor in Sociology & Anthropology, presented his work at the annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference. The conference was held from April 5–6, 2019 in Forest Grove, Oregon. Brian presented his paper, “A Critique on the Historical Interpretation of Pirates.” In addition, his […]

24 Apr 19
Feline Opines

Hello There Furiends! Spring has sprung….finally! The Tribe of Five is waiting for The Female Human to get that pop up catio out of the garage and let us out into the fresh air.  She does seem to be taking her sweet time though and I’m getting a bit impatient. Humans, they never seem to […]

24 Apr 19
Joseph's writing subjects

This article is about The Museums Of Science. I chose this topic because I like going to museums in my area once in a while. I always like the educational resources that they have at some of the museums in my hometown. I researched the article about Museums Of Science at the CCC library in […]

24 Apr 19
NATION AND STATE

An Oregon aluminum extrusion manufacturer has agreed to pay $46 million to NASA, the Department of Defense, and others to resolve criminal charges and civil claims relating to a 19-year fraud scheme that included falsifying thousands of certifications for aluminum extrusions provided to hundreds of customers. Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice […]

24 Apr 19
Nourish Food Marketing

Across the food spectrum, the vocabulary of health and wellness is evolving. We called it out in our 2019 Trend Report, and it’s one of the most intriguing food trends to watch. It’s shifting away from established nutritional and condition-specific call-outs like ‘gluten-free’ and ‘heart healthy’. More and more we see product labelling that highlights […]