Orient

17 Jul 19
Energy News and Information

When completing stock analysis, investors and traders may opt to review other technical levels. Pan Orient Energy Corp (POE.V) currently has a … from Google Alert – energy trading https://ift.tt/2SjsXI6

17 Jul 19
Daily Republic

Jul. 17–Rule No. 1 in the sailboat racing handbook: Save lives. That’s just what the crew aboard the 68-foot Pyewacket did in the dark, early-morning hours Monday, July 15, when another boat, the Orient Express, started to sink during the 2,225-mile Transpacific Yacht Race. “There were no other choices for us, it was the obvious […]

17 Jul 19
Archy news nety

Do you want the best of VICE News directly in your inbox? Sign up here. A Congressman from New Jersey is asking the Pentagon to investigate a decades-old conspiracy that the government has armed ticks and ended up creating Lyme disease. Republican Representative Chris Smith presented an amendment to ask the Department of Defense Inspector […]

17 Jul 19
All Saints Church, Pasadena

Take a stand for children in detention centers and for family reunification! Sunday July 28th kids and families across America are taking a stand to raise awareness about the continued separation of migrant families and raise funds to support migrant families. All proceeds from the nationwide network of lemonade stands hosted by the Lawyer Moms […]

17 Jul 19
Called A Library

I have a couple of critical questions I ask clients when I first start working with them. One of them is “what percentage of your life is currently your own?” It's always enlightening to see what comes back. The answers range from 5% to 100%, with the major sitting in the 10- 30% bracket. The…

17 Jul 19
Fast Food Internationalism

full disclosure i wrote this at midnight at a bar. i had a 10 dollar glass of mead and instantly hated what i had become. Theologico Political Fragment is… weird. Even for Benjamin, it is obscurantist, both dense and airy, and seemingly abstracted into oblivion. I think it’s kind of useful though. It provides a […]

17 Jul 19
Areo

It was a scene that seemed anachronistic and perplexing to Western observers. For a few brief moments on July 1st 2019, the 22nd anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong to China, the British colonial flag made an appearance on the lectern of the Hong Kong legislative chamber. For the young protesters who had stormed […]

17 Jul 19
Soccer 360 Magazine

The International Champions Cup is back! The summer club competition is entering its seventh year with some of the top sides from across Europe coming to Asia, North America, and a smattering of matches at home. It is a great chance for supporters to see how their teams are sizing up ahead of the 2019/2020 […]

17 Jul 19
Daily Crossword Puzzle Solver

Welcome to Crossword Puzzle Answers. Our website is dedicated to Crossword Answers. We solve all the clues from publishers such as New York Times, LA Times, USA Today etc. Since you arrived at this particular page you are looking for the answer to Evening Standard Quick July 18th 2019 Crossword Clues so without wasting your […]

17 Jul 19
Technopreneurph

“Getting great results” and “creating great reports” are very different skill sets. If you’re like most marketers, you’d rather sharpen your subject-matter expertise than spend time in PowerPoint. The result is that reporting becomes an afterthought rather than an opportunity—a “necessary evil” with imperfect solutions: Manual reporting is too time-consuming, but it’s been the only […]

17 Jul 19
Technopreneurph

“Getting great results” and “creating great reports” are very different skill sets. If you’re like most marketers, you’d rather sharpen your subject-matter expertise than spend time in PowerPoint. The result is that reporting becomes an afterthought rather than an opportunity—a “necessary evil” with imperfect solutions: Manual reporting is too time-consuming, but it’s been the only […]

17 Jul 19
Daily Breeze
Rule No. 1 in the sailboat racing handbook: Save lives. That’s just what the crew aboard the 68-foot Pyewacket did in the dark, early-morning hours Monday, July 15, when another boat, the Orient Express, started to sink during the 2,225-mile Transpacific Yacht Race. “There were no other choices for us, it was the obvious thing to do,” Roy Disney, captain of Pyewacket, said in a video interview with race officials after the rescue. “I don’t think any of us could live with ourselves if we sailed on. We did the things we had to do.” It was the first time in the history of the Transpacific Yacht Race, which goes from San Pedro to Hawaii, that a boat has sunk during the race, according to the race’s staff commodore, Bo Wheeler. John Sangmeister, aboard the Orient Express, a Santa Cruz 70 out of Long Beach Yacht Club referred to as “OEX,” recalled hearing a loud boom. Water started rushing into the boat through a hole in the stern where the rudder post would be, according to a recount on the Transpac website. “It was blowing as if it were a geyser.” Unable to get a handle on the rising water the crew deployed emergency life rafts and made a distress call over the radio. Disney, the grandnephew of Walt Disney, said in the video posted on the Transpac site that he heard the plea for help over the radio. “You could just hear something urgent in the sound of the voice.” Then, the Pyewacket crew realized it was OEX, longtime rivals in the tight-nit, offshore sailing world. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. They approached to see two lifeboats next to each other with lights shining in the darkness. It was an eerie sight seeing the boat going under waves, Disney said in the video account. Disney was sailing the biennial Transpac for what he said was a record 23rd time. This was Sangmeister’s eighth Transpac. “There was no panic, there was no distress, other than guys getting into a lifeboat in the middle of the night in the dark in the middle of the Pacific,” Disney said.  “But everyone handled it perfectly. This is a tribute to sailors in general and our groups that it worked out the way it did.” Seeing Pyewacket approaching was a welcome sight in the dark of night, Sangmeister said in the video. Sangmeister, the owner of Gladstone’s waterfront restaurant in Long Beach, had sailed with Disney, and his father, also Roy Disney, in 1987. “I’m really sorry we ruined your race,” he said to Disney. “I felt really confident that Roy and his remarkable crew would look after us once we got into the boats.” Which they did, welcoming the crew aboard with ribs and wine before heading back to dry land. The Pyewacket returned to the Windward Yacht Center with 19 people aboard, 10 more than it had departed with on Saturday, July 13, at the start of the race. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “We are reminded that sailing across vast oceans is not without peril,” Long Beach Yacht Club Commodore Camille Daniels said in a statement. “The Pyewacket crew exemplify the true Corinthian spirit of the ocean racing community. On behalf of the Long Beach Yacht Club, I would like to extend our sincerest gratitude and appreciation to Roy Pat Disney and the crew on Pyewacket for their swift response in coming to the aid of their fellow competitors.” The biennial race dates back to 1906, and the race, still underway for some boats, is celebrating its 50th race.  Susan Hess heard of OEX’s troubles and said she worried for her nephew, Daniel Geissmann, who is a spinnaker trimmer aboard the Destroyer, more-so than the previous two races he’s competed in. “Reports of lots of debris that no one can see at night until they hit it,” she wrote in an e-mail. “Hope and pray everyone makes it to the finish in good shape … They’re doing pretty well right now, but these accidents demonstrate how quickly it can all go wrong.” Transpac Yacht Club Commodore Tom Hogan on Wednesday, July 17, said the race organizers are planning something special for Disney and the Pyewacket crew at the trophy presentation. “It will probably get pretty emotional,” he said. Hogan said he sent Disney an e-mail after the incident, writing that “seamanship and respect for fellow yachtsman in a race like that is what our sport is all about.” “That’s what makes the sport,” Hogan said. “The racing aspect is competitive, but taking care of everyone in the middle of the race and rescuing someone, that’s really neat.” Racing in the middle of the ocean has  inherent dangers, and that’s why there’s safety and training requirements for situations that can occur out at sea when you’re thousands of miles away from land, he said. The Transpac is one of the oldest long-distance sailing races in the world, this year drawing about 90 ships for the journey across the Pacific. Several hail from local harbors from Los Angeles to San Diego, helming boats ranging in length from 30 to 100 feet. Hogan said the fastest of the ships should arrive in Hawaii by early Thursday morning. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
17 Jul 19
Orange County Register
Rule No. 1 in the sailboat racing handbook: Save lives. That’s just what the crew aboard the 68-foot Pyewacket did in the dark, early-morning hours Monday, July 15, when another boat, the Orient Express, started to sink during the 2,225-mile Transpacific Yacht Race. “There were no other choices for us, it was the obvious thing to do,” Roy Disney, captain of Pyewacket, said in a video interview with race officials after the rescue. “I don’t think any of us could live with ourselves if we sailed on. We did the things we had to do.” It was the first time in the history of the Transpacific Yacht Race, which goes from San Pedro to Hawaii, that a boat has sunk during the race, according to the race’s staff commodore, Bo Wheeler. John Sangmeister, aboard the Orient Express, a Santa Cruz 70 out of Long Beach Yacht Club referred to as “OEX,” recalled hearing a loud boom. Water started rushing into the boat through a hole in the stern where the rudder post would be, according to a recount on the Transpac website. “It was blowing as if it were a geyser.” Unable to get a handle on the rising water the crew deployed emergency life rafts and made a distress call over the radio. Disney, the grandnephew of Walt Disney, said in the video posted on the Transpac site that he heard the plea for help over the radio. “You could just hear something urgent in the sound of the voice.” Then, the Pyewacket crew realized it was OEX, longtime rivals in the tight-nit, offshore sailing world. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. They approached to see two lifeboats next to each other with lights shining in the darkness. It was an eerie sight seeing the boat going under waves, Disney said in the video account. Disney was sailing the biennial Transpac for what he said was a record 23rd time. This was Sangmeister’s eighth Transpac. “There was no panic, there was no distress, other than guys getting into a lifeboat in the middle of the night in the dark in the middle of the Pacific,” Disney said.  “But everyone handled it perfectly. This is a tribute to sailors in general and our groups that it worked out the way it did.” Seeing Pyewacket approaching was a welcome sight in the dark of night, Sangmeister said in the video. Sangmeister, the owner of Gladstone’s waterfront restaurant in Long Beach, had sailed with Disney, and his father, also Roy Disney, in 1987. “I’m really sorry we ruined your race,” he said to Disney. “I felt really confident that Roy and his remarkable crew would look after us once we got into the boats.” Which they did, welcoming the crew aboard with ribs and wine before heading back to dry land. The Pyewacket returned to the Windward Yacht Center with 19 people aboard, 10 more than it had departed with on Saturday, July 13, at the start of the race. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “We are reminded that sailing across vast oceans is not without peril,” Long Beach Yacht Club Commodore Camille Daniels said in a statement. “The Pyewacket crew exemplify the true Corinthian spirit of the ocean racing community. On behalf of the Long Beach Yacht Club, I would like to extend our sincerest gratitude and appreciation to Roy Pat Disney and the crew on Pyewacket for their swift response in coming to the aid of their fellow competitors.” The biennial race dates back to 1906, and the race, still underway for some boats, is celebrating its 50th race.  Susan Hess heard of OEX’s troubles and said she worried for her nephew, Daniel Geissmann, who is a spinnaker trimmer aboard the Destroyer, more-so than the previous two races he’s competed in. “Reports of lots of debris that no one can see at night until they hit it,” she wrote in an e-mail. “Hope and pray everyone makes it to the finish in good shape … They’re doing pretty well right now, but these accidents demonstrate how quickly it can all go wrong.” Transpac Yacht Club Commodore Tom Hogan on Wednesday, July 17, said the race organizers are planning something special for Disney and the Pyewacket crew at the trophy presentation. “It will probably get pretty emotional,” he said. Hogan said he sent Disney an e-mail after the incident, writing that “seamanship and respect for fellow yachtsman in a race like that is what our sport is all about.” “That’s what makes the sport,” Hogan said. “The racing aspect is competitive, but taking care of everyone in the middle of the race and rescuing someone, that’s really neat.” Racing in the middle of the ocean has  inherent dangers, and that’s why there’s safety and training requirements for situations that can occur out at sea when you’re thousands of miles away from land, he said. The Transpac is one of the oldest long-distance sailing races in the world, this year drawing about 90 ships for the journey across the Pacific. Several hail from local harbors from Los Angeles to San Diego, helming boats ranging in length from 30 to 100 feet. Hogan said the fastest of the ships should arrive in Hawaii by early Thursday morning. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
17 Jul 19
Press Telegram
Rule No. 1 in the sailboat racing handbook: Save lives. That’s just what the crew aboard the 68-foot Pyewacket did in the dark, early-morning hours Monday, July 15, when another boat, the Orient Express, started to sink during the 2,225-mile Transpacific Yacht Race. “There were no other choices for us, it was the obvious thing to do,” Roy Disney, captain of Pyewacket, said in a video interview with race officials after the rescue. “I don’t think any of us could live with ourselves if we sailed on. We did the things we had to do.” It was the first time in the history of the Transpacific Yacht Race, which goes from San Pedro to Hawaii, that a boat has sunk during the race, according to the race’s staff commodore, Bo Wheeler. John Sangmeister, aboard the Orient Express, a Santa Cruz 70 out of Long Beach Yacht Club referred to as “OEX,” recalled hearing a loud boom. Water started rushing into the boat through a hole in the stern where the rudder post would be, according to a recount on the Transpac website. “It was blowing as if it were a geyser.” Unable to get a handle on the rising water the crew deployed emergency life rafts and made a distress call over the radio. Disney, the grandnephew of Walt Disney, said in the video posted on the Transpac site that he heard the plea for help over the radio. “You could just hear something urgent in the sound of the voice.” Then, the Pyewacket crew realized it was OEX, longtime rivals in the tight-nit, offshore sailing world. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. They approached to see two lifeboats next to each other with lights shining in the darkness. It was an eerie sight seeing the boat going under waves, Disney said in the video account. Disney was sailing the biennial Transpac for what he said was a record 23rd time. This was Sangmeister’s eighth Transpac. “There was no panic, there was no distress, other than guys getting into a lifeboat in the middle of the night in the dark in the middle of the Pacific,” Disney said.  “But everyone handled it perfectly. This is a tribute to sailors in general and our groups that it worked out the way it did.” Seeing Pyewacket approaching was a welcome sight in the dark of night, Sangmeister said in the video. Sangmeister, the owner of Gladstone’s waterfront restaurant in Long Beach, had sailed with Disney, and his father, also Roy Disney, in 1987. “I’m really sorry we ruined your race,” he said to Disney. “I felt really confident that Roy and his remarkable crew would look after us once we got into the boats.” Which they did, welcoming the crew aboard with ribs and wine before heading back to dry land. The Pyewacket returned to the Windward Yacht Center with 19 people aboard, 10 more than it had departed with on Saturday, July 13, at the start of the race. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “We are reminded that sailing across vast oceans is not without peril,” Long Beach Yacht Club Commodore Camille Daniels said in a statement. “The Pyewacket crew exemplify the true Corinthian spirit of the ocean racing community. On behalf of the Long Beach Yacht Club, I would like to extend our sincerest gratitude and appreciation to Roy Pat Disney and the crew on Pyewacket for their swift response in coming to the aid of their fellow competitors.” The biennial race dates back to 1906, and the race, still underway for some boats, is celebrating its 50th race.  Susan Hess heard of OEX’s troubles and said she worried for her nephew, Daniel Geissmann, who is a spinnaker trimmer aboard the Destroyer, more-so than the previous two races he’s competed in. “Reports of lots of debris that no one can see at night until they hit it,” she wrote in an e-mail. “Hope and pray everyone makes it to the finish in good shape … They’re doing pretty well right now, but these accidents demonstrate how quickly it can all go wrong.” Transpac Yacht Club Commodore Tom Hogan on Wednesday, July 17, said the race organizers are planning something special for Disney and the Pyewacket crew at the trophy presentation. “It will probably get pretty emotional,” he said. Hogan said he sent Disney an e-mail after the incident, writing that “seamanship and respect for fellow yachtsman in a race like that is what our sport is all about.” “That’s what makes the sport,” Hogan said. “The racing aspect is competitive, but taking care of everyone in the middle of the race and rescuing someone, that’s really neat.” Racing in the middle of the ocean has  inherent dangers, and that’s why there’s safety and training requirements for situations that can occur out at sea when you’re thousands of miles away from land, he said. The Transpac is one of the oldest long-distance sailing races in the world, this year drawing about 90 ships for the journey across the Pacific. Several hail from local harbors from Los Angeles to San Diego, helming boats ranging in length from 30 to 100 feet. Hogan said the fastest of the ships should arrive in Hawaii by early Thursday morning. The Associated Press contributed to this report.