Oscars 2018

22 Jan 19
Scott H Gilliland

The Academy Award nominations are due later today (UK time) and I kinda forgot about it a little, so this is very much a rushed job! I will come back in a few days to go over how right or wrong I was with my picks, but in the meantime have a gander and see […]

22 Jan 19
GoldDerby
Nominations for the 91st Oscars were announced on Tuesday Jan. 22 by Tracee Ellis Ross (“blackish”) and 2018 Oscar nominee Kumail Nanjiani (“The Big Sick”) at the academy’s headquarters in Beverly Hills, California. (Scroll down for the full and complete list.) Final voting doesn’t start until Feb. 20 and then runs for eight days. The Academy Awards ceremony takes place on February 24 and for the first time in three decades, it won’t have a host. At 5:20 a.m. PT/8:20 a.m. ET, nominees were announced in nine categories: Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Costume Design, Film Editing, Original Score,  Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Animated Short and Live Action Short. At 5:30 a.m. PT/8:30 a.m. ET, nominees were announced in the remaining 15 races: Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, Adapted Screenplay, Original Screenplay, Cinematography, Makeup and Hairstyling, Original Song, Production Design, Visual Effects, Animated Feature, Documentary Feature, Documentary Short and Foreign Language Film. DISCUSS All the Oscar contenders with Hollywood insiders in our notorious forums Refresh this page for the most up-to-date results  Best Picture Best Director  Best Actress  Best Actor Best Supporting Actress  Best Supporting Actor Best Adapted Screenplay Best Original Screenplay Best Cinematography Best Costume Design Best Film Editing Best Makeup and Hairstyling Best Original Score Best Original Song Best Production Design Best Sound Editing Best Sound Mixing Best Visual Effects Best Foreign Language Film Best Animated Feature Best Animated Short Film Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Best Live Action Short SIGN UP for Gold Derby’s free newsletter with latest predictions
22 Jan 19
Journeys in Darkness and Light

Since my website is down for maintenance right now, you’ll get my entire here first! Thanks for reading. In an earlier post, I mentioned that I both love and hate lists. I love making them, but I hate that people (including myself) tend to consider lists inflexible, rigid, carved in stone. Since my tastes are […]

22 Jan 19
TechCrunch

VMG Partners has led the $51 million round, with participation from new investors GV and ACME Capital (fka Sherpa Capital).

22 Jan 19
Thrive Global
Courtesy of Academy Awards 1984Famous words uttered when Sally Field won her second Oscar for the drama Places in the Heart.  That earnest, vulnerable moment became the butt of countless jokes over the years.  To be fair, it may be that this adjective – likeable – is applied more to women than it is to men. Each of us is constantly judged by the immediate impressions’ others have — they decide if they like us or trust us based not our résumés, nor our work, but rather on looks and perception.  Male candidates are judged by likeability, too. We call it “charisma,” or talk about it in terms of which guy we’d rather have as a golf partner.  But it’s the same thing. When two men are running against each other for office, is it fair that the taller candidate almost always wins, or that a full head of hair may be worth a point? When we attribute leadership qualities to politicians, who knows what arbitrary factors influence us? It might be that the likeability question is confronting women more lately simply because we are seeing more viable female candidates running for president, Congress, the boardroom, and at the top or organizations. Still, there is a sense that the likeability scale is a new phenomenon and that, but when it comes to women candidates, whether it be in politics or at the helm of an organization, we ought to be focused on things that matter, like her experience and worldview.  The first questions a reporter asked Kirsten Gillibrand when she announced her candidacy for president was whether she saw herself as pretty likable, a nice person, and whether that was a “selling point.” He compared her to another Democratic senator considering a run for president whom he also deemed likable — Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota — and asked whether voters want “someone like that now.” Women face a double standard when it comes to public scrutiny – even as Americans say they’re ready for a female president or a woman at the top of an organization. Male candidates face intense scrutiny on many counts but “likability” is seldom one of them.  How many have been asked by anyone personally or professionally whether or not they are likable? Look at Jill Abramson, the first woman executive editor of the New York Times, who was described by staffers as “impossible to work with,” and “not approachable,” just days after the paper won four Pulitzer prizes under her leadership (the third highest number ever received by the newspaper).   It seems that high-achieving women experience social backlash because their very success – and specifically the behaviors that created that success – violates our expectations about how women are supposed to behave.   Women are expected to be nice, warm, friendly, and supportive.  So, if a woman acts assertively or competitively, if she pushes her team to perform, if she exhibits decisive and forceful leadership, she is deviating from the social script that dictates how she “should” behave.  By violating beliefs about what women are like, successful women receive pushback for being insufficiently feminine or too masculine. They are known by the “B” word and we often don’t really like them.  And being “likeable” means different things to different people – social, racial and gender bias become real barriers.   During the course of my career, I encountered men who said terrible sexist things to me and I would push back. Then my mentors would tell me that I needed to “watch my tone” and not become “over-emotional.”  Silly me, I’d forgotten to smile sweetly and make a joke about their behavior.  And worse yet, I forgot to add a happy smiley face at the end of the email. I am sure there are many women who have been asked to watch their tone –a.k.a. code for aggressive, pushy or bossy – all the negative traits associated with a woman exercising power.  This is not an uncommon thing for women in leadership. You know, I found out that men don’t care if you do or don’t like them. They don’t care if you don’t like their decisions. They don’t care if you are envious of their success. If they have a problem with another man, they’ll go out back, fight it out, and then go off for a beer together. But women? We have to be liked!  We automatically adjust our behavior to be likable. And, if I’m completely honest, as women we do care what others think about us and that gives us less power in the boardroom and in our personal lives. In a world where we want the top jobs and equal pay and equal rights, we have to stop playing a supporting role in our own lives. By wanting to be liked, we are more concerned with what others think about us than with doing the very best job, even if it’s not popular. Last year, 2018, was the year of the woman in politics!  Female politicians weren’t running for office to be gentle, they were running to govern. They weren’t planning to be benevolent mothers, they were planning to be legislators, period!  The thing about the likability question is it doesn’t really matter in the end.  Women candidates made it to Washington despite the tweets and despite centuries’ worth of people not liking them. We should never start with likability. Likability can come later. Likability can come when all genders are equally represented, when it’s common enough that people start to wonder what the fuss was about in the first place.  We can like women later. Let’s start by getting them in the room and at the top
22 Jan 19
El Rincón de las palabras

El Hobbit (the Hobbit, or There and back again) es una novela fantástica del filólogo y escritor británico J. R. R. Tolkien. Fue escrita por partes desde finales de los años 1920 hasta principios de los años 1930 con el objetivo inicial de divertir a sus hijos pequeños. La obra aún sin acabar se presentó […]

22 Jan 19
her-reflections.

EMPTECH ACTIVITY #1   Bullet Journalism. START A BULLET JOURNAL Are you someone who struggles to stay on top of things? Is your schedule all over the place, and does it stress you out? I used to be like that. In fact, most of my life was spent in a state of confusion and frustration […]

22 Jan 19
Sound Books

2018 has ended on a high note for the NFB. Two NFB productions have made it onto TIFF’s prestigious Top Ten list — Patrick Bouchard’s masterful stop motion animation The Subject (Le Sujet) and Christy Garland’s Palestine-set coming-of-age story What Walaa Wants, a Murmur Media/Final Cut for Real/NFB co-production that’s set for theatrical run at […]

22 Jan 19
RAPPED OUT

A judge has decided that Kevin Hart’s former business partner, Stand Up Digital, has shown enough evidence at the point to have their court room show down continue. From Kevin quitting as the host of the 2018 Oscars award show due to his remarks about the LGQBT community, to this Kevin’s 2019 is off to […]

22 Jan 19
A MOTION PICTURE LIST

Of the 39 films I saw in 2018 these are my ten favourites. No 1. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle This is the second time I have included a list of my favourite films, and surprisingly top is Jumanji. This was a genuine pleasure having gone to see it without any real expectation of enjoying […]