Panther Martin

23 Feb 19
Encore Rehabilitation

MONTGOMERY – North-South all-star squads for the upcoming 60th AHSAA North-South All-Star Football Game have been selected. The two37-memeber teams comprised of 2019 graduating seniors were announced by Jamie Lee Director of the Alabama High School Athletic Directors & Coaches Association (AHSADCA) Tuesday. The AHSADCA, which operates under the auspices of the Alabama High School […]

23 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” Martin Luther King Jr. wrote in his Letter From Birmingham Jail on April 16, 1963. King was arrested there for his role in organizing nonviolent protests against segregation, which were being led by the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. “Birmingham is probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States,” King also wrote in that famous letter. Civil-rights campaigners were so frequently targeted with bombs by the Ku Klux Klan that the city was often called “Bombingham.” Five months after King’s letter, one of those bombs went off at Birmingham’s 16th Street Baptist Church, killing four little girls. Today, across the street from that church sits the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI), which for more than a quarter century has educated and inspired millions of visitors. Last October, the BCRI announced it would bestow its 2018 Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award on Angela Y. Davis, the legendary civil-rights activist, prison abolition advocate and scholar. Angela Davis is a Birmingham native, and grew up amidst segregation. Her neighborhood suffered so many Klan bombings that it was nicknamed “Dynamite Hill.” The daughter of civil-rights activists, she went on to become a prominent member of the Communist Party USA and a leader in the Black Panther Party. As a result, like so many activists in that era (MLK included), she was targeted by the FBI. She was charged as a conspirator in the shooting death of a judge. She faced three death sentences in a trial that became an international cause celebre. She was ultimately acquitted of all the charges. The BCRI’s decision to honor Angela Davis made perfect sense. She has gained renown for her tireless work on behalf of prisoners and to abolish the U.S. prison-industrial complex. Integral to her life’s work, she has long expressed unflinching support for the rights of Palestinian people. In a recently published collection of essays and speeches titled “Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement,” she writes, reflecting on the life of Nelson Mandela and the successful campaign to eliminate South African apartheid, “We are now confronted with the task of assisting our sisters and brothers in Palestine as they battle against Israeli apartheid.” Two months after the BCRI board members announced that she had been granted the Shuttlesworth award, they received a letter from the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center asking them to reconsider the award in part because of Davis’ “outspoken support of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel.” The BCRI board, in a 9-2 vote, rescinded the award. It canceled the award gala that had been scheduled for Feb. 16. The response in Birmingham was swift and angry. Birmingham’s school board and city council both voted unanimously to show their support for Davis. Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin publicly condemned the decision. A group formed to plan an event to honor Davis on the night of the original gala. Within days, the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute board reversed its decision and asked Angela Davis to accept the award. Last Friday night, “Angela Solidarity Shabbats” were held in dozens of cities, organized by Jewish Voice for Peace. Jesse Schaffer hosted the celebration in Birmingham. “My Judaism is directly rooted in social justice,” he told us at the Shabbat. “For me, Angela Davis is a direct expression of those values, and she has always understood that our historic struggles are linked, whether it’s Palestinians, it’s black folks in the South, Jewish folks – really, any struggle for justice – that they’re all linked and that we’re stronger together.” On Saturday night, more than 3,000 people poured into Birmingham’s Boutwell Auditorium for an evening organized by the Birmingham Committee for Truth and Reconciliation. At the event, Davis reflected on how meaningful the Shabbats were to her: “‘Angela, sister, you are welcome in this Shabbat’ comes from a slogan that was used on many posters all over the country when I was underground fleeing the FBI. People put up these posters on their doors: ‘Angela, sister, you are welcome in this house.’” The city’s first elected African-American mayor, Richard Arrington, Jr., wrapped up the evening, saying, “I am especially proud that in this moment of challenge we ran not in different directions, not venting the anger and the frustration we felt; instead, we ran to one another, linked arms, embraced one another and lifted up a daughter who is celebrated in the world community for her stand on human rights.” Angela Davis says whether or not she returns to accept the Shuttlesworth Award will have to be a community decision. She offered as her final words Saturday night: “Let us use this moment to generate the strength and the enthusiasm and the vision to move forward to a better future for Birmingham, for the country and for the entire world.”
22 Feb 19
Full Press Coverage

The New York Giants were awarded a compensatory draft pick in the 2019 NFL Draft Friday. Compensatory draft picks are awarded to team based on the league’s formula of free agents signed versus free agents lost for the previous season. Per the NFL: Compensatory free agents are determined by a formula based on salary, playing […]

22 Feb 19

The NFL and football fans across the globe were rocked today by the news that New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, age 77, will be charged with two counts of soliciting prostitution. The charges resulted from a massive sting operation in Florida which has produced a total of 50 arrests so far and 200 warrants. […]

22 Feb 19
Sentinel Colorado

LOS ANGELES | The most tumultuous Oscar season in memory might pale in comparison to the aftermath. The best picture race to Sunday’s 91st Academy Awards remains unpredictable, but odds makers peg Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” as the film most likely to triumph at the end of the night. That would hand Netflix, the insurgent steaming […]

22 Feb 19
National Post

LOS ANGELES — The most tumultuous Oscar season in memory might pale in comparison to the aftermath. The best picture race to Sunday’s 91st Academy Awards remains unpredictable, but odds makers peg Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” as the film most likely to triumph at the end of the night. That would hand Netflix, the insurgent steaming […]

22 Feb 19
Comics Pit

SAVAGE AVENGERS #1 GERRY DUGGAN • MIKE DEODATO JR. (A) Cover by DAVID FINCH VARIANT COVER BY MIKE DEODATO JR. VARIANT COVER BY SIMONE BIANCHI VARIANT COVER BY TBA VARIANT COVER BY SKOTTIE YOUNG VARIANT COVER BY LEINIL FRANCIS YU HIDDEN GEM VARIANT COVER BY MOEBIUS BLANK VARIANT COVER ALSO AVAILABLE The most savage, most […]

22 Feb 19
Orange County Register
#gallery-6700344-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6700344-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6700344-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6700344-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Tennis star Roger Federer, of Switzerland, celebrates after winning the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells in 2018. He says fans who attend the annual competiton are some of the most knowledgeable in the world. (Photo by Mark J. Terrill, The Associated Press) Angela Jooste, 12, of San Diego, participates in a fan contest at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden where she had to catch a tennis ball on her racket thrown from a stage 25 feet away. She won a poster of the famous U.S. doubles team, Mike and Bob Bryan. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Wayne Bryan, coach and father of the famous tennis duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, entertains fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open March 5-18. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) A fan takes a selfie with French tennis player Jeremy Chardy at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open.(Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) French tennis player Jeremy Chardy signs an autograph for a young fan at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Fans watch as Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev hits the practice courts with Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tennis fans pack Stadium 1 at the BNP Paribas Open Tennis Tournament at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. The tournament attracts more than 450,000 fans every March. (File photo by Rodrigo Pena) Roger Federer says he finds fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to be some of the most knowledgeable in the world. That’s high praise coming from the winner of 20 Grand Slam singles titles, the most for any man in the sport’s history. Speaking to reporters after a routine win at the BNP Paribas Open last year, the Swiss star said fans here not only come for the tennis, but also the gorgeous weather and everything else the region has to offer. “They almost use it as somewhat of a vacation,” he said. “So it feels very laid back. It’s also nice the tournament has invested a lot so fans can have an even better experience.” Last year, about 450,500 basked in sunshine during a week and a half of exhilarating tennis at the  BNP Paribas Open, owned by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison, which features top tennis players and has earned the moniker, “the fifth slam.” The four major tournaments or Grand Slams that award the most prestigious titles in tennis are The Championships at Wimbledon, the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Still, Indian Wells remains a player favorite. They bring along their spouses and children to this event and no player can be seen missing this tournament, unless he or she is injured. The tournament has undoubtedly remained a fan favorite as well, for all the reasons Federer mentioned, and then some. This year, the BNP Paribas Open will include all of the top 75 ranked men’s and women’s players in the world, including defending champions Juan Martin del Potro and Naomi Osaka. Last year, the tournament introduced a number of new features to please fans further, including an interactive lounge where you can put on a pair of virtual reality goggles and get the experience of watching a match as if you were sitting courtside. The lounge also offered a place to relax and charge cell phones. Another recently added feature is the BNP Paribas Open mobile app for both Apple and Android devices with which fans can keep up with live scores, the latest news, player updates, ticket information and venue details. It even has a restaurant guide. The app also tells fans which players are on the practice courts at what times. Watching players practice or warm up on a football field next to the practice courts is probably the biggest highlight for eager fans who wish to catch an up-close glimpse of their favorite player or get a few prized autographs. The practice courts are what distinguish this tournament from any other, including the Grand Slams, said Sam Querrey, one of the top-ranked American players. “In other tournaments, the practice courts are kind of secluded,” he said. “But here, more than watching the matches, fans come to watch the players.” From the players’ perspective, interacting with fans can be a fun. French player Gael Monfils, known to thrill fans with his athleticism and flamboyance on court, said being loved by fans is “a blessing” and means a lot to him. Last year, at the BNP Paribas Open, Monfils did the “Wakanda salute” from the blockbuster movie “Black Panther” after winning as the crowd erupted in cheers. He loves the fans just as much as they love him, Monfils said. “You have these super-fans following you, in the street, in the shop, not far from where you live,” he said, smiling. “It can get a little bit weird sometimes, but that’s the way our job is.” Belarusian player Victoria Azarenka, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, said she finds the fan base here to be extremely tennis-literate. “I feel like there are a lot of people who come who actually play tennis themselves and are true tennis fans,” she said. “You also see a lot of kids who play juniors. So, that’s really cool.” Around the grounds, fans have an array of restaurants to choose from, and more opportunities to talk tennis and meet the players. Wayne Bryan, tennis coach and father of the famed “Bryan Brothers” doubles team (Bob and Mike Bryan), a regular at the tournament, usually puts on a daily show on the grounds around lunch time called “Tennis Talk with Coach Wayne Bryan.” Bryan interviewed French player Jeremy Chardy during last year’s tournament as they sat on a stage before fans, coaxing information out of the shy player about his first meeting several years ago with American tennis legend Pete Sampras. Spectators laughed as Chardy talked about being extremely nervous in front of his hero and barely mustering the courage to ask for a photo together. He told Bryan he wanted another meeting with Sampras just to erase that embarrassing memory. Before Chardy got on stage, younger fans had a shot at winning a few prizes. Angela Jooste, a junior player from San Diego, won an extemporaneous contest. Bryan threw a tennis ball and the kid who caught it with a tennis racket the farthest away from the stage would win a Bryan Brothers poster. Jooste caught the ball, first from 25 feet away and then from 50 feet and 100 feet. This was her first time at Indian Wells and she was trying to get as many autographs from players as she could, Jooste said. “My favorite is Angelique Kerber,” she said, referring to the top German player. “I want to play just like her.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Bryan said he encourages kids who come to watch the practices as much as they watch the games. “I always tell them, champions take it in through their eyes, not their ears,” he said. Robin Iden and Jeff Locke, who were enjoying their lunch on the grounds, said they drove their RV all the way from Albuquerque, N.M.  The couple was staying at an RV park three miles away from the tennis action. Locke said he made the reservation for $70 a day about two months earlier. “It’s a really nice RV park,” Iden said. “And very convenient.” This was their first time here. But, they say, there’s little reason not to come back. BNP Paribas Open When: March 4-17 Where: Indian Wells Tennis Garden, 78-200 Miles Ave., Indian Wells Information: 800-999-1585; bnpparibasopen.com
22 Feb 19
Whittier Daily News
#gallery-1737758-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1737758-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1737758-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1737758-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Tennis star Roger Federer, of Switzerland, celebrates after winning the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells in 2018. He says fans who attend the annual competiton are some of the most knowledgeable in the world. (Photo by Mark J. Terrill, The Associated Press) Angela Jooste, 12, of San Diego, participates in a fan contest at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden where she had to catch a tennis ball on her racket thrown from a stage 25 feet away. She won a poster of the famous U.S. doubles team, Mike and Bob Bryan. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Wayne Bryan, coach and father of the famous tennis duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, entertains fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open March 5-18. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) A fan takes a selfie with French tennis player Jeremy Chardy at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open.(Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) French tennis player Jeremy Chardy signs an autograph for a young fan at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Fans watch as Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev hits the practice courts with Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tennis fans pack Stadium 1 at the BNP Paribas Open Tennis Tournament at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. The tournament attracts more than 450,000 fans every March. (File photo by Rodrigo Pena) Roger Federer says he finds fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to be some of the most knowledgeable in the world. That’s high praise coming from the winner of 20 Grand Slam singles titles, the most for any man in the sport’s history. Speaking to reporters after a routine win at the BNP Paribas Open last year, the Swiss star said fans here not only come for the tennis, but also the gorgeous weather and everything else the region has to offer. “They almost use it as somewhat of a vacation,” he said. “So it feels very laid back. It’s also nice the tournament has invested a lot so fans can have an even better experience.” Last year, about 450,500 basked in sunshine during a week and a half of exhilarating tennis at the  BNP Paribas Open, owned by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison, which features top tennis players and has earned the moniker, “the fifth slam.” The four major tournaments or Grand Slams that award the most prestigious titles in tennis are The Championships at Wimbledon, the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Still, Indian Wells remains a player favorite. They bring along their spouses and children to this event and no player can be seen missing this tournament, unless he or she is injured. The tournament has undoubtedly remained a fan favorite as well, for all the reasons Federer mentioned, and then some. This year, the BNP Paribas Open will include all of the top 75 ranked men’s and women’s players in the world, including defending champions Juan Martin del Potro and Naomi Osaka. Last year, the tournament introduced a number of new features to please fans further, including an interactive lounge where you can put on a pair of virtual reality goggles and get the experience of watching a match as if you were sitting courtside. The lounge also offered a place to relax and charge cell phones. Another recently added feature is the BNP Paribas Open mobile app for both Apple and Android devices with which fans can keep up with live scores, the latest news, player updates, ticket information and venue details. It even has a restaurant guide. The app also tells fans which players are on the practice courts at what times. Watching players practice or warm up on a football field next to the practice courts is probably the biggest highlight for eager fans who wish to catch an up-close glimpse of their favorite player or get a few prized autographs. The practice courts are what distinguish this tournament from any other, including the Grand Slams, said Sam Querrey, one of the top-ranked American players. “In other tournaments, the practice courts are kind of secluded,” he said. “But here, more than watching the matches, fans come to watch the players.” From the players’ perspective, interacting with fans can be a fun. French player Gael Monfils, known to thrill fans with his athleticism and flamboyance on court, said being loved by fans is “a blessing” and means a lot to him. Last year, at the BNP Paribas Open, Monfils did the “Wakanda salute” from the blockbuster movie “Black Panther” after winning as the crowd erupted in cheers. He loves the fans just as much as they love him, Monfils said. “You have these super-fans following you, in the street, in the shop, not far from where you live,” he said, smiling. “It can get a little bit weird sometimes, but that’s the way our job is.” Belarusian player Victoria Azarenka, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, said she finds the fan base here to be extremely tennis-literate. “I feel like there are a lot of people who come who actually play tennis themselves and are true tennis fans,” she said. “You also see a lot of kids who play juniors. So, that’s really cool.” Around the grounds, fans have an array of restaurants to choose from, and more opportunities to talk tennis and meet the players. Wayne Bryan, tennis coach and father of the famed “Bryan Brothers” doubles team (Bob and Mike Bryan), a regular at the tournament, usually puts on a daily show on the grounds around lunch time called “Tennis Talk with Coach Wayne Bryan.” Bryan interviewed French player Jeremy Chardy during last year’s tournament as they sat on a stage before fans, coaxing information out of the shy player about his first meeting several years ago with American tennis legend Pete Sampras. Spectators laughed as Chardy talked about being extremely nervous in front of his hero and barely mustering the courage to ask for a photo together. He told Bryan he wanted another meeting with Sampras just to erase that embarrassing memory. Before Chardy got on stage, younger fans had a shot at winning a few prizes. Angela Jooste, a junior player from San Diego, won an extemporaneous contest. Bryan threw a tennis ball and the kid who caught it with a tennis racket the farthest away from the stage would win a Bryan Brothers poster. Jooste caught the ball, first from 25 feet away and then from 50 feet and 100 feet. This was her first time at Indian Wells and she was trying to get as many autographs from players as she could, Jooste said. “My favorite is Angelique Kerber,” she said, referring to the top German player. “I want to play just like her.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Bryan said he encourages kids who come to watch the practices as much as they watch the games. “I always tell them, champions take it in through their eyes, not their ears,” he said. Robin Iden and Jeff Locke, who were enjoying their lunch on the grounds, said they drove their RV all the way from Albuquerque, N.M.  The couple was staying at an RV park three miles away from the tennis action. Locke said he made the reservation for $70 a day about two months earlier. “It’s a really nice RV park,” Iden said. “And very convenient.” This was their first time here. But, they say, there’s little reason not to come back. BNP Paribas Open When: March 4-17 Where: Indian Wells Tennis Garden, 78-200 Miles Ave., Indian Wells Information: 800-999-1585; bnpparibasopen.com
22 Feb 19
Daily News
#gallery-3042557-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3042557-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-3042557-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3042557-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Tennis star Roger Federer, of Switzerland, celebrates after winning the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells in 2018. He says fans who attend the annual competiton are some of the most knowledgeable in the world. (Photo by Mark J. Terrill, The Associated Press) Angela Jooste, 12, of San Diego, participates in a fan contest at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden where she had to catch a tennis ball on her racket thrown from a stage 25 feet away. She won a poster of the famous U.S. doubles team, Mike and Bob Bryan. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Wayne Bryan, coach and father of the famous tennis duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, entertains fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open March 5-18. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) A fan takes a selfie with French tennis player Jeremy Chardy at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open.(Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) French tennis player Jeremy Chardy signs an autograph for a young fan at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Fans watch as Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev hits the practice courts with Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tennis fans pack Stadium 1 at the BNP Paribas Open Tennis Tournament at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. The tournament attracts more than 450,000 fans every March. (File photo by Rodrigo Pena) Roger Federer says he finds fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to be some of the most knowledgeable in the world. That’s high praise coming from the winner of 20 Grand Slam singles titles, the most for any man in the sport’s history. Speaking to reporters after a routine win at the BNP Paribas Open last year, the Swiss star said fans here not only come for the tennis, but also the gorgeous weather and everything else the region has to offer. “They almost use it as somewhat of a vacation,” he said. “So it feels very laid back. It’s also nice the tournament has invested a lot so fans can have an even better experience.” Last year, about 450,500 basked in sunshine during a week and a half of exhilarating tennis at the  BNP Paribas Open, owned by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison, which features top tennis players and has earned the moniker, “the fifth slam.” The four major tournaments or Grand Slams that award the most prestigious titles in tennis are The Championships at Wimbledon, the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Still, Indian Wells remains a player favorite. They bring along their spouses and children to this event and no player can be seen missing this tournament, unless he or she is injured. The tournament has undoubtedly remained a fan favorite as well, for all the reasons Federer mentioned, and then some. This year, the BNP Paribas Open will include all of the top 75 ranked men’s and women’s players in the world, including defending champions Juan Martin del Potro and Naomi Osaka. Last year, the tournament introduced a number of new features to please fans further, including an interactive lounge where you can put on a pair of virtual reality goggles and get the experience of watching a match as if you were sitting courtside. The lounge also offered a place to relax and charge cell phones. Another recently added feature is the BNP Paribas Open mobile app for both Apple and Android devices with which fans can keep up with live scores, the latest news, player updates, ticket information and venue details. It even has a restaurant guide. The app also tells fans which players are on the practice courts at what times. Watching players practice or warm up on a football field next to the practice courts is probably the biggest highlight for eager fans who wish to catch an up-close glimpse of their favorite player or get a few prized autographs. The practice courts are what distinguish this tournament from any other, including the Grand Slams, said Sam Querrey, one of the top-ranked American players. “In other tournaments, the practice courts are kind of secluded,” he said. “But here, more than watching the matches, fans come to watch the players.” From the players’ perspective, interacting with fans can be a fun. French player Gael Monfils, known to thrill fans with his athleticism and flamboyance on court, said being loved by fans is “a blessing” and means a lot to him. Last year, at the BNP Paribas Open, Monfils did the “Wakanda salute” from the blockbuster movie “Black Panther” after winning as the crowd erupted in cheers. He loves the fans just as much as they love him, Monfils said. “You have these super-fans following you, in the street, in the shop, not far from where you live,” he said, smiling. “It can get a little bit weird sometimes, but that’s the way our job is.” Belarusian player Victoria Azarenka, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, said she finds the fan base here to be extremely tennis-literate. “I feel like there are a lot of people who come who actually play tennis themselves and are true tennis fans,” she said. “You also see a lot of kids who play juniors. So, that’s really cool.” Around the grounds, fans have an array of restaurants to choose from, and more opportunities to talk tennis and meet the players. Wayne Bryan, tennis coach and father of the famed “Bryan Brothers” doubles team (Bob and Mike Bryan), a regular at the tournament, usually puts on a daily show on the grounds around lunch time called “Tennis Talk with Coach Wayne Bryan.” Bryan interviewed French player Jeremy Chardy during last year’s tournament as they sat on a stage before fans, coaxing information out of the shy player about his first meeting several years ago with American tennis legend Pete Sampras. Spectators laughed as Chardy talked about being extremely nervous in front of his hero and barely mustering the courage to ask for a photo together. He told Bryan he wanted another meeting with Sampras just to erase that embarrassing memory. Before Chardy got on stage, younger fans had a shot at winning a few prizes. Angela Jooste, a junior player from San Diego, won an extemporaneous contest. Bryan threw a tennis ball and the kid who caught it with a tennis racket the farthest away from the stage would win a Bryan Brothers poster. Jooste caught the ball, first from 25 feet away and then from 50 feet and 100 feet. This was her first time at Indian Wells and she was trying to get as many autographs from players as she could, Jooste said. “My favorite is Angelique Kerber,” she said, referring to the top German player. “I want to play just like her.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Bryan said he encourages kids who come to watch the practices as much as they watch the games. “I always tell them, champions take it in through their eyes, not their ears,” he said. Robin Iden and Jeff Locke, who were enjoying their lunch on the grounds, said they drove their RV all the way from Albuquerque, N.M.  The couple was staying at an RV park three miles away from the tennis action. Locke said he made the reservation for $70 a day about two months earlier. “It’s a really nice RV park,” Iden said. “And very convenient.” This was their first time here. But, they say, there’s little reason not to come back. BNP Paribas Open When: March 4-17 Where: Indian Wells Tennis Garden, 78-200 Miles Ave., Indian Wells Information: 800-999-1585; bnpparibasopen.com
22 Feb 19
Pasadena Star News
#gallery-2208918-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2208918-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2208918-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2208918-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Tennis star Roger Federer, of Switzerland, celebrates after winning the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells in 2018. He says fans who attend the annual competiton are some of the most knowledgeable in the world. (Photo by Mark J. Terrill, The Associated Press) Angela Jooste, 12, of San Diego, participates in a fan contest at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden where she had to catch a tennis ball on her racket thrown from a stage 25 feet away. She won a poster of the famous U.S. doubles team, Mike and Bob Bryan. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Wayne Bryan, coach and father of the famous tennis duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, entertains fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open March 5-18. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) A fan takes a selfie with French tennis player Jeremy Chardy at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open.(Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) French tennis player Jeremy Chardy signs an autograph for a young fan at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Fans watch as Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev hits the practice courts with Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tennis fans pack Stadium 1 at the BNP Paribas Open Tennis Tournament at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. The tournament attracts more than 450,000 fans every March. (File photo by Rodrigo Pena) Roger Federer says he finds fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to be some of the most knowledgeable in the world. That’s high praise coming from the winner of 20 Grand Slam singles titles, the most for any man in the sport’s history. Speaking to reporters after a routine win at the BNP Paribas Open last year, the Swiss star said fans here not only come for the tennis, but also the gorgeous weather and everything else the region has to offer. “They almost use it as somewhat of a vacation,” he said. “So it feels very laid back. It’s also nice the tournament has invested a lot so fans can have an even better experience.” Last year, about 450,500 basked in sunshine during a week and a half of exhilarating tennis at the  BNP Paribas Open, owned by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison, which features top tennis players and has earned the moniker, “the fifth slam.” The four major tournaments or Grand Slams that award the most prestigious titles in tennis are The Championships at Wimbledon, the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Still, Indian Wells remains a player favorite. They bring along their spouses and children to this event and no player can be seen missing this tournament, unless he or she is injured. The tournament has undoubtedly remained a fan favorite as well, for all the reasons Federer mentioned, and then some. This year, the BNP Paribas Open will include all of the top 75 ranked men’s and women’s players in the world, including defending champions Juan Martin del Potro and Naomi Osaka. Last year, the tournament introduced a number of new features to please fans further, including an interactive lounge where you can put on a pair of virtual reality goggles and get the experience of watching a match as if you were sitting courtside. The lounge also offered a place to relax and charge cell phones. Another recently added feature is the BNP Paribas Open mobile app for both Apple and Android devices with which fans can keep up with live scores, the latest news, player updates, ticket information and venue details. It even has a restaurant guide. The app also tells fans which players are on the practice courts at what times. Watching players practice or warm up on a football field next to the practice courts is probably the biggest highlight for eager fans who wish to catch an up-close glimpse of their favorite player or get a few prized autographs. The practice courts are what distinguish this tournament from any other, including the Grand Slams, said Sam Querrey, one of the top-ranked American players. “In other tournaments, the practice courts are kind of secluded,” he said. “But here, more than watching the matches, fans come to watch the players.” From the players’ perspective, interacting with fans can be a fun. French player Gael Monfils, known to thrill fans with his athleticism and flamboyance on court, said being loved by fans is “a blessing” and means a lot to him. Last year, at the BNP Paribas Open, Monfils did the “Wakanda salute” from the blockbuster movie “Black Panther” after winning as the crowd erupted in cheers. He loves the fans just as much as they love him, Monfils said. “You have these super-fans following you, in the street, in the shop, not far from where you live,” he said, smiling. “It can get a little bit weird sometimes, but that’s the way our job is.” Belarusian player Victoria Azarenka, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, said she finds the fan base here to be extremely tennis-literate. “I feel like there are a lot of people who come who actually play tennis themselves and are true tennis fans,” she said. “You also see a lot of kids who play juniors. So, that’s really cool.” Around the grounds, fans have an array of restaurants to choose from, and more opportunities to talk tennis and meet the players. Wayne Bryan, tennis coach and father of the famed “Bryan Brothers” doubles team (Bob and Mike Bryan), a regular at the tournament, usually puts on a daily show on the grounds around lunch time called “Tennis Talk with Coach Wayne Bryan.” Bryan interviewed French player Jeremy Chardy during last year’s tournament as they sat on a stage before fans, coaxing information out of the shy player about his first meeting several years ago with American tennis legend Pete Sampras. Spectators laughed as Chardy talked about being extremely nervous in front of his hero and barely mustering the courage to ask for a photo together. He told Bryan he wanted another meeting with Sampras just to erase that embarrassing memory. Before Chardy got on stage, younger fans had a shot at winning a few prizes. Angela Jooste, a junior player from San Diego, won an extemporaneous contest. Bryan threw a tennis ball and the kid who caught it with a tennis racket the farthest away from the stage would win a Bryan Brothers poster. Jooste caught the ball, first from 25 feet away and then from 50 feet and 100 feet. This was her first time at Indian Wells and she was trying to get as many autographs from players as she could, Jooste said. “My favorite is Angelique Kerber,” she said, referring to the top German player. “I want to play just like her.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Bryan said he encourages kids who come to watch the practices as much as they watch the games. “I always tell them, champions take it in through their eyes, not their ears,” he said. Robin Iden and Jeff Locke, who were enjoying their lunch on the grounds, said they drove their RV all the way from Albuquerque, N.M.  The couple was staying at an RV park three miles away from the tennis action. Locke said he made the reservation for $70 a day about two months earlier. “It’s a really nice RV park,” Iden said. “And very convenient.” This was their first time here. But, they say, there’s little reason not to come back. BNP Paribas Open When: March 4-17 Where: Indian Wells Tennis Garden, 78-200 Miles Ave., Indian Wells Information: 800-999-1585; bnpparibasopen.com
22 Feb 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
#gallery-1868037-5 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1868037-5 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1868037-5 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1868037-5 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Tennis star Roger Federer, of Switzerland, celebrates after winning the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells in 2018. He says fans who attend the annual competiton are some of the most knowledgeable in the world. (Photo by Mark J. Terrill, The Associated Press) Angela Jooste, 12, of San Diego, participates in a fan contest at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden where she had to catch a tennis ball on her racket thrown from a stage 25 feet away. She won a poster of the famous U.S. doubles team, Mike and Bob Bryan. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Wayne Bryan, coach and father of the famous tennis duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, entertains fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open March 5-18. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) A fan takes a selfie with French tennis player Jeremy Chardy at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open.(Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) French tennis player Jeremy Chardy signs an autograph for a young fan at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Fans watch as Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev hits the practice courts with Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tennis fans pack Stadium 1 at the BNP Paribas Open Tennis Tournament at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. The tournament attracts more than 450,000 fans every March. (File photo by Rodrigo Pena) Roger Federer says he finds fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to be some of the most knowledgeable in the world. That’s high praise coming from the winner of 20 Grand Slam singles titles, the most for any man in the sport’s history. Speaking to reporters after a routine win at the BNP Paribas Open last year, the Swiss star said fans here not only come for the tennis, but also the gorgeous weather and everything else the region has to offer. “They almost use it as somewhat of a vacation,” he said. “So it feels very laid back. It’s also nice the tournament has invested a lot so fans can have an even better experience.” Last year, about 450,500 basked in sunshine during a week and a half of exhilarating tennis at the  BNP Paribas Open, owned by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison, which features top tennis players and has earned the moniker, “the fifth slam.” The four major tournaments or Grand Slams that award the most prestigious titles in tennis are The Championships at Wimbledon, the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Still, Indian Wells remains a player favorite. They bring along their spouses and children to this event and no player can be seen missing this tournament, unless he or she is injured. The tournament has undoubtedly remained a fan favorite as well, for all the reasons Federer mentioned, and then some. This year, the BNP Paribas Open will include all of the top 75 ranked men’s and women’s players in the world, including defending champions Juan Martin del Potro and Naomi Osaka. Last year, the tournament introduced a number of new features to please fans further, including an interactive lounge where you can put on a pair of virtual reality goggles and get the experience of watching a match as if you were sitting courtside. The lounge also offered a place to relax and charge cell phones. Another recently added feature is the BNP Paribas Open mobile app for both Apple and Android devices with which fans can keep up with live scores, the latest news, player updates, ticket information and venue details. It even has a restaurant guide. The app also tells fans which players are on the practice courts at what times. Watching players practice or warm up on a football field next to the practice courts is probably the biggest highlight for eager fans who wish to catch an up-close glimpse of their favorite player or get a few prized autographs. The practice courts are what distinguish this tournament from any other, including the Grand Slams, said Sam Querrey, one of the top-ranked American players. “In other tournaments, the practice courts are kind of secluded,” he said. “But here, more than watching the matches, fans come to watch the players.” From the players’ perspective, interacting with fans can be a fun. French player Gael Monfils, known to thrill fans with his athleticism and flamboyance on court, said being loved by fans is “a blessing” and means a lot to him. Last year, at the BNP Paribas Open, Monfils did the “Wakanda salute” from the blockbuster movie “Black Panther” after winning as the crowd erupted in cheers. He loves the fans just as much as they love him, Monfils said. “You have these super-fans following you, in the street, in the shop, not far from where you live,” he said, smiling. “It can get a little bit weird sometimes, but that’s the way our job is.” Belarusian player Victoria Azarenka, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, said she finds the fan base here to be extremely tennis-literate. “I feel like there are a lot of people who come who actually play tennis themselves and are true tennis fans,” she said. “You also see a lot of kids who play juniors. So, that’s really cool.” Around the grounds, fans have an array of restaurants to choose from, and more opportunities to talk tennis and meet the players. Wayne Bryan, tennis coach and father of the famed “Bryan Brothers” doubles team (Bob and Mike Bryan), a regular at the tournament, usually puts on a daily show on the grounds around lunch time called “Tennis Talk with Coach Wayne Bryan.” Bryan interviewed French player Jeremy Chardy during last year’s tournament as they sat on a stage before fans, coaxing information out of the shy player about his first meeting several years ago with American tennis legend Pete Sampras. Spectators laughed as Chardy talked about being extremely nervous in front of his hero and barely mustering the courage to ask for a photo together. He told Bryan he wanted another meeting with Sampras just to erase that embarrassing memory. Before Chardy got on stage, younger fans had a shot at winning a few prizes. Angela Jooste, a junior player from San Diego, won an extemporaneous contest. Bryan threw a tennis ball and the kid who caught it with a tennis racket the farthest away from the stage would win a Bryan Brothers poster. Jooste caught the ball, first from 25 feet away and then from 50 feet and 100 feet. This was her first time at Indian Wells and she was trying to get as many autographs from players as she could, Jooste said. “My favorite is Angelique Kerber,” she said, referring to the top German player. “I want to play just like her.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Bryan said he encourages kids who come to watch the practices as much as they watch the games. “I always tell them, champions take it in through their eyes, not their ears,” he said. Robin Iden and Jeff Locke, who were enjoying their lunch on the grounds, said they drove their RV all the way from Albuquerque, N.M.  The couple was staying at an RV park three miles away from the tennis action. Locke said he made the reservation for $70 a day about two months earlier. “It’s a really nice RV park,” Iden said. “And very convenient.” This was their first time here. But, they say, there’s little reason not to come back. BNP Paribas Open When: March 4-17 Where: Indian Wells Tennis Garden, 78-200 Miles Ave., Indian Wells Information: 800-999-1585; bnpparibasopen.com
22 Feb 19
SCNG
#gallery-793554-6 { margin: auto; } #gallery-793554-6 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-793554-6 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-793554-6 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Tennis star Roger Federer, of Switzerland, celebrates after winning the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells in 2018. He says fans who attend the annual competiton are some of the most knowledgeable in the world. (Photo by Mark J. Terrill, The Associated Press) Angela Jooste, 12, of San Diego, participates in a fan contest at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden where she had to catch a tennis ball on her racket thrown from a stage 25 feet away. She won a poster of the famous U.S. doubles team, Mike and Bob Bryan. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Wayne Bryan, coach and father of the famous tennis duo, Bob and Mike Bryan, entertains fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open March 5-18. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) A fan takes a selfie with French tennis player Jeremy Chardy at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open.(Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) French tennis player Jeremy Chardy signs an autograph for a young fan at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden during the BNP Paribas Open. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Fans watch as Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev hits the practice courts with Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells. (Photo by Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tennis fans pack Stadium 1 at the BNP Paribas Open Tennis Tournament at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. The tournament attracts more than 450,000 fans every March. (File photo by Rodrigo Pena) Roger Federer says he finds fans at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to be some of the most knowledgeable in the world. That’s high praise coming from the winner of 20 Grand Slam singles titles, the most for any man in the sport’s history. Speaking to reporters after a routine win at the BNP Paribas Open last year, the Swiss star said fans here not only come for the tennis, but also the gorgeous weather and everything else the region has to offer. “They almost use it as somewhat of a vacation,” he said. “So it feels very laid back. It’s also nice the tournament has invested a lot so fans can have an even better experience.” Last year, about 450,500 basked in sunshine during a week and a half of exhilarating tennis at the  BNP Paribas Open, owned by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison, which features top tennis players and has earned the moniker, “the fifth slam.” The four major tournaments or Grand Slams that award the most prestigious titles in tennis are The Championships at Wimbledon, the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Still, Indian Wells remains a player favorite. They bring along their spouses and children to this event and no player can be seen missing this tournament, unless he or she is injured. The tournament has undoubtedly remained a fan favorite as well, for all the reasons Federer mentioned, and then some. This year, the BNP Paribas Open will include all of the top 75 ranked men’s and women’s players in the world, including defending champions Juan Martin del Potro and Naomi Osaka. Last year, the tournament introduced a number of new features to please fans further, including an interactive lounge where you can put on a pair of virtual reality goggles and get the experience of watching a match as if you were sitting courtside. The lounge also offered a place to relax and charge cell phones. Another recently added feature is the BNP Paribas Open mobile app for both Apple and Android devices with which fans can keep up with live scores, the latest news, player updates, ticket information and venue details. It even has a restaurant guide. The app also tells fans which players are on the practice courts at what times. Watching players practice or warm up on a football field next to the practice courts is probably the biggest highlight for eager fans who wish to catch an up-close glimpse of their favorite player or get a few prized autographs. The practice courts are what distinguish this tournament from any other, including the Grand Slams, said Sam Querrey, one of the top-ranked American players. “In other tournaments, the practice courts are kind of secluded,” he said. “But here, more than watching the matches, fans come to watch the players.” From the players’ perspective, interacting with fans can be a fun. French player Gael Monfils, known to thrill fans with his athleticism and flamboyance on court, said being loved by fans is “a blessing” and means a lot to him. Last year, at the BNP Paribas Open, Monfils did the “Wakanda salute” from the blockbuster movie “Black Panther” after winning as the crowd erupted in cheers. He loves the fans just as much as they love him, Monfils said. “You have these super-fans following you, in the street, in the shop, not far from where you live,” he said, smiling. “It can get a little bit weird sometimes, but that’s the way our job is.” Belarusian player Victoria Azarenka, a two-time champion at Indian Wells, said she finds the fan base here to be extremely tennis-literate. “I feel like there are a lot of people who come who actually play tennis themselves and are true tennis fans,” she said. “You also see a lot of kids who play juniors. So, that’s really cool.” Around the grounds, fans have an array of restaurants to choose from, and more opportunities to talk tennis and meet the players. Wayne Bryan, tennis coach and father of the famed “Bryan Brothers” doubles team (Bob and Mike Bryan), a regular at the tournament, usually puts on a daily show on the grounds around lunch time called “Tennis Talk with Coach Wayne Bryan.” Bryan interviewed French player Jeremy Chardy during last year’s tournament as they sat on a stage before fans, coaxing information out of the shy player about his first meeting several years ago with American tennis legend Pete Sampras. Spectators laughed as Chardy talked about being extremely nervous in front of his hero and barely mustering the courage to ask for a photo together. He told Bryan he wanted another meeting with Sampras just to erase that embarrassing memory. Before Chardy got on stage, younger fans had a shot at winning a few prizes. Angela Jooste, a junior player from San Diego, won an extemporaneous contest. Bryan threw a tennis ball and the kid who caught it with a tennis racket the farthest away from the stage would win a Bryan Brothers poster. Jooste caught the ball, first from 25 feet away and then from 50 feet and 100 feet. This was her first time at Indian Wells and she was trying to get as many autographs from players as she could, Jooste said. “My favorite is Angelique Kerber,” she said, referring to the top German player. “I want to play just like her.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Bryan said he encourages kids who come to watch the practices as much as they watch the games. “I always tell them, champions take it in through their eyes, not their ears,” he said. Robin Iden and Jeff Locke, who were enjoying their lunch on the grounds, said they drove their RV all the way from Albuquerque, N.M.  The couple was staying at an RV park three miles away from the tennis action. Locke said he made the reservation for $70 a day about two months earlier. “It’s a really nice RV park,” Iden said. “And very convenient.” This was their first time here. But, they say, there’s little reason not to come back. BNP Paribas Open When: March 4-17 Where: Indian Wells Tennis Garden, 78-200 Miles Ave., Indian Wells Information: 800-999-1585; bnpparibasopen.com