Paramount

19 Dec 18
The Denver Post
The nation’s largest grocery chain is trying to leap into the driverless delivery market, announcing Tuesday that it is now ready to bring milk, eggs and apples to some customers’ homes in a vehicle with nobody at the wheel. Although limited to delivering within about a mile (1.6 kilometers) of one Arizona supermarket, it represents the latest step for industries trying to lower delivery costs of everyday items as well as those trying to launch self-driving cars on public roads. But Tuesday’s launch also highlighted some of the many challenges that are still ahead for autonomous vehicles: One of the compact cars didn’t drive as planned at a media demonstration and had to be pushed up a ramp and onto a truck by several men. The delivery vehicle’s battery had died, but the company still planned to make driverless grocery deliveries later Tuesday, said Dave Ferguson, president and co-founder of Nuro, the company that developed the autonomous vehicle. Kroger and Nuro, which is based in Mountain View, California, announced Tuesday they would begin delivering groceries in Scottsdale, Arizona, using an autonomous vehicle called the R1, which has no steering wheel and no seats for humans. Nuro has been delivering groceries with larger, manned self-driving vehicles since August. It will be adding two of its completely unmanned R1 vehicles to that fleet, Ferguson said. When summoned, the R1 will travel within a one-mile radius of the Fry’s Food grocery store just east of the Phoenix Zoo at speeds up to 25 miles per hour (40 kph) on residential roads, but stay clear of main roads or highways, according to Pam Giannonatti, corporate affairs manager at Cincinnati-based Kroger Co.’s Fry’s division. Customers, after placing an order on their smartphone or laptop, will get a text message when the groceries are on their way. Another message will alert them when the grocery delivery is curbside. Once the vehicle arrives, the customer will receive a punch code to open the doors of the vehicle, Giannonatti said. Customers will pay a flat fee of $5.95 and can request same-day or next-day delivery. The unmanned delivery vehicles will be followed by a “shadow car,” which will be driven by a human with the ability to stop or control it. The “chase car” is being used in the early stages of the program out of an abundance of caution and will be eventually phased out, Ferguson said. “This is not yet at the point where in any way it’s economically better than just sending someone out in a car to deliver your groceries,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina, who teaches about emerging technologies. “It will probably cost much more, and the range is minimal, and there are lots of ways it would not be a true, commercial-scale, viable deployment, but it’s an important step on that path.” Attempts to deploy fully autonomous vehicles on public streets have been limited by technological hurdles, as well as human apprehension. Uber pulled its self-driving cars out of Arizona this year following the death in March of woman who was run over by one of the ride-hailing service’s robotic vehicles while she crossed a darkened street in a Phoenix suburb. It was the first death involving a fully autonomous vehicle. That vehicle had a backup driver at the wheel. Waymo, a self-driving car spinoff from a Google project, has been offering free rides in robotic vehicles with no human backup driver as part of a test program in the Phoenix area for the past year. Earlier this month, Waymo launched a ride-hailing service available to about 200 people that will have a human behind the wheel to take control in case something goes awry. Giannonatti said safety is paramount in this next step of autonomous vehicle technology. Because the R1 delivery vehicle is unmanned, it was designed to prioritize safety of other drivers or pedestrians without trading off the safety or comfort of a driver or passengers, Ferguson said. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The delivery vehicle’s size — half the width of a Toyota Corolla — also helps prevent collisions with pedestrians because there’s more buffer room, Ferguson said. Kroger has been working hard to boost online sales in order to keep up with Walmart and Amazon, which bought grocer Whole Foods last year. Tuesday’s announcement puts Kroger ahead of Walmart and Amazon in self-driving deliveries, says Jon Reily, vice president of commerce strategy at Publicis.Sapient. “But ultimately,” he says, “there are so many challenges with autonomous vehicles” to make it a reality nationwide. Among them: state laws and weather. Arizona’s laws have been friendlier to self-driving vehicles, and the weather in Scottsdale is more predictable than in other parts of the country. ___ Brian Skoloff in Scottsdale, Arizona, Joseph Pisani in New York and Michael Liedtke in San Francisco contributed to this story.
19 Dec 18
Texas Poker

The big stake is over 1million which includes an expanding number of energy to each turn. 188BET Casino comprehends that players must be remained careful while betting on the web. In case you’re seeking to join to 188BET Casino you can capitalize on some incredible offers. Wagering on the web doesn’t need to be distressing. Truly, […]

19 Dec 18
Jenn Med

  I am so into the Law of Attraction these days.  I have been so conscious of how my emotions, thoughts, and words dictate what happens in my life.  I have been practicing this for a few years, and I can honestly say that I feel more in control of my life.  I try not […]

19 Dec 18
Back To The Front Porch

If you’re looking for a fun, meaningful alternative to Elf on the Shelf, I found this to be an easy and entertaining solution for our family. Setting up our nativity scene was a tad bitter-sweet for me this year. In addition to a beautiful hand-made set from my husband’s grandfather, we own a nativity scene given […]

19 Dec 18

pepllc

Skip to Main content DNA Vaccine DNA vaccines are the newest type of vaccine and consist of only a DNA molecule encoding the antigen(s) of interest and, possibly, costimulatory molecules such as cytokines. From: Principles of Molecular Virology (Sixth Edition), 2016 Related terms: AntigenObstetric DeliveryProteinVaccineInfectionImmune ResponseGeneDNAPlasmidVaccination Learn more about DNA Vaccine DNA Vaccines John J. […]

19 Dec 18
Shawn Miller

The nation’s largest grocery chain stepped into the driverless delivery market Tuesday, bringing milk, eggs and other items to a customer’s home in a vehicle with nobody at the wheel. Although limited to delivering within about a mile of one Arizona supermarket owned by Kroger Co., it represents the latest step for industries trying to […]

19 Dec 18
Julie Bullet's Weblog

So, the Hooter’s marketing peeps want to feature me in an upcoming magazine to show me a little “Orange Pride”. They needed me to write about the things I learned while working there (many ions ago) and how those skills later benefitted me in my career path, and eventually to becoming an entreprenuer. I thought […]

19 Dec 18
chrisheerooimo

It seems like in this world where social media has opened up everything to criticism that it’s almost a certainty that somebody somewhere is offended by something! Add to that we seem to be raising a generation of extremely sensitive children that aren’t ready for the world when they become an adult. Top it off with the […]

19 Dec 18
This is My Life - Fifty and Beyond

A number of years ago, back in 1993, the year prior to my AIDS diagnosis, a serious problem began to arise in communities, that were thought to be anomalies. That problem was HETEROSEXUAL Elderly Men and Women, who became infected with AIDS. In Fort Lauderdale, in those times, the ratio of Women to Men were […]

19 Dec 18
Nye Cameron

Levi saw the little clock on the nightstand mocking him. 3:18am. He and Damien had kissed—oh, how they had kissed—for hours, kissing and slowly disrobing—and oh, wasn’t that the best foreplay ever?—as the Previews, Coming Attractions and the “Get Snacks in Our Lobby” message before the Feature Presentation that was their lovemaking began playing. And […]

19 Dec 18
Mantou MTL

The little boy obediently listened to his mommy. After an hour on the iPad, he ran upstairs and took his remote control airplane down to play on the lawn. Putting down what she was doing, Cheng Liyue walked slowly over to the lawn to keep her son company. That was how they passed the day. […]

19 Dec 18
Movie Nation

Don’t be fooled by the wallow in ’80s nostalgia — music, fashion, the bad TV. It’s just naked pandering to its “I grew UP with ‘Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye!” first-gen fans. What the “Bumblebee” reboot of “Transformers” really offers is what the TV show that spawned it had going for it — childish […]

19 Dec 18
Goodness & Love Follow

You want to hear something funny? I started this entry last Winter but then I got the flu and never finished it. Oh, the irony. It took awhile to get back in the swing of things {mom of 3 littles in bed for a few days equals 2+ weeks of catch up} and it got […]

19 Dec 18
East Bay Times
By CATHY BUSSEWITZ | Associated Press The nation’s largest grocery chain stepped into the driverless delivery market Tuesday, bringing milk, eggs and other items to a customer’s home in a vehicle with nobody at the wheel. Although limited to delivering within about a mile of one Arizona supermarket owned by Kroger Co., it represents the latest step for industries trying to lower delivery costs of everyday items and those trying to launch self-driving cars on public roads. Tuesday’s delivery arrived at Shannon Baggett’s house in the Phoenix suburb of Scottsdale. She was already receiving groceries weekly from larger, manned self-driving vehicles that the company Nuro developed and launched in August. She said it was surreal to see nobody in the car bringing her milk, eggs and strawberries. “It was very cool to see it pull up. It was a lot smaller than I thought it would be,” Baggett said. “I told my husband, ‘We just got our groceries delivered by a robot.’ “ But Tuesday’s launch also highlighted some of the many challenges still ahead for autonomous vehicles: One of the compact cars didn’t drive as planned at a media demonstration because of a dead battery and had to be pushed up a ramp and onto a truck by several men. Kroger and Nuro, which is based in Mountain View, announced Tuesday that they would deliver groceries in the Scottsdale area, using an autonomous vehicle called the R1, which has no steering wheel and no seats for people. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Nuro will be adding two of its completely unmanned R1 vehicles to its fleet of manned self-driving vehicles that deliver groceries, said Dave Ferguson, president and co-founder of Nuro. When summoned, the R1 will travel within a 1-mile radius of the Fry’s Food store just east of the Phoenix Zoo at speeds up to 25 miles per hour on residential roads but stay clear of main roads or highways, according to Pam Giannonatti, corporate affairs manager at Cincinnati-based Kroger’s Fry’s division. Customers place an order on their smartphone or laptop and get a text message when the groceries are on their way. Another message will alert them when the delivery is curbside. Once the vehicle arrives, the customer will receive a code to punch in to open the doors, Giannonatti said. Customers will pay a flat fee of $5.95 and can request same-day or next-day delivery. The unmanned delivery vehicles will be followed by a “shadow car,” driven by a person with the ability to stop or control it. This car is being used in the early stages of the program out of caution and will be phased out, Ferguson said. “This is not yet at the point where in any way it’s economically better than just sending someone out in a car to deliver your groceries,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina, who teaches about emerging technologies. “It will probably cost much more, and the range is minimal, and there are lots of ways it would not be a true, commercial-scale, viable deployment, but it’s an important step on that path.” Technological hurdles and apprehension have limited attempts to deploy fully autonomous vehicles on public streets. [dfm_iframe src=”http://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=breaking-mn” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Uber pulled its self-driving cars out of Arizona this year after one of the ride-hailing service’s robotic vehicles hit and killed a woman as she crossed a darkened street in a Phoenix suburb in March. It was the first death involving a fully autonomous vehicle. A backup driver was at the wheel. Waymo, a self-driving car spinoff from a Google project, has been offering free rides in robotic vehicles with no backup driver as part of a test program in the Phoenix area for the past year. Earlier this month, Waymo launched a ride-hailing service available to about 200 people that will have a person behind the wheel in case something goes awry. Giannonatti of Kroger said safety is paramount in this next step of autonomous vehicle technology. Because Nuro’s R1 delivery vehicle is unmanned, it was designed to prioritize safety of other drivers and pedestrians without trading off the safety or comfort of a driver or passengers, Ferguson said. The vehicle’s size — half the width of a Toyota Corolla — also helps prevent collisions with pedestrians because there’s more buffer room, he said.Kroger has been working to boost online sales to keep up with Walmart and Amazon, which bought grocer Whole Foods last year. Tuesday’s announcement puts Kroger ahead of Walmart and Amazon in self-driving deliveries, says Jon Reily, vice president of commerce strategy at Publicis.Sapient. “But ultimately,” he says, “there are so many challenges with autonomous vehicles” to make it a reality nationwide. Among them: state laws and weather. Arizona’s laws have been friendlier to self-driving vehicles, and the weather in Scottsdale is more predictable than in other parts of the country. Associated Press journalists Brian Skoloff in Scottsdale, Arizona, Terry Tang in Phoenix, Joseph Pisani in New York and Michael Liedtke in San Francisco contributed to this story.
19 Dec 18
Santa Cruz Sentinel
By CATHY BUSSEWITZ | Associated Press The nation’s largest grocery chain stepped into the driverless delivery market Tuesday, bringing milk, eggs and other items to a customer’s home in a vehicle with nobody at the wheel. Although limited to delivering within about a mile of one Arizona supermarket owned by Kroger Co., it represents the latest step for industries trying to lower delivery costs of everyday items and those trying to launch self-driving cars on public roads. Tuesday’s delivery arrived at Shannon Baggett’s house in the Phoenix suburb of Scottsdale. She was already receiving groceries weekly from larger, manned self-driving vehicles that the company Nuro developed and launched in August. She said it was surreal to see nobody in the car bringing her milk, eggs and strawberries. “It was very cool to see it pull up. It was a lot smaller than I thought it would be,” Baggett said. “I told my husband, ‘We just got our groceries delivered by a robot.’ “ But Tuesday’s launch also highlighted some of the many challenges still ahead for autonomous vehicles: One of the compact cars didn’t drive as planned at a media demonstration because of a dead battery and had to be pushed up a ramp and onto a truck by several men. Kroger and Nuro, which is based in Mountain View, announced Tuesday that they would deliver groceries in the Scottsdale area, using an autonomous vehicle called the R1, which has no steering wheel and no seats for people. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Nuro will be adding two of its completely unmanned R1 vehicles to its fleet of manned self-driving vehicles that deliver groceries, said Dave Ferguson, president and co-founder of Nuro. When summoned, the R1 will travel within a 1-mile radius of the Fry’s Food store just east of the Phoenix Zoo at speeds up to 25 miles per hour on residential roads but stay clear of main roads or highways, according to Pam Giannonatti, corporate affairs manager at Cincinnati-based Kroger’s Fry’s division. Customers place an order on their smartphone or laptop and get a text message when the groceries are on their way. Another message will alert them when the delivery is curbside. Once the vehicle arrives, the customer will receive a code to punch in to open the doors, Giannonatti said. Customers will pay a flat fee of $5.95 and can request same-day or next-day delivery. The unmanned delivery vehicles will be followed by a “shadow car,” driven by a person with the ability to stop or control it. This car is being used in the early stages of the program out of caution and will be phased out, Ferguson said. “This is not yet at the point where in any way it’s economically better than just sending someone out in a car to deliver your groceries,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina, who teaches about emerging technologies. “It will probably cost much more, and the range is minimal, and there are lots of ways it would not be a true, commercial-scale, viable deployment, but it’s an important step on that path.” Technological hurdles and apprehension have limited attempts to deploy fully autonomous vehicles on public streets. [dfm_iframe src=”http://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=breaking-mn” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Uber pulled its self-driving cars out of Arizona this year after one of the ride-hailing service’s robotic vehicles hit and killed a woman as she crossed a darkened street in a Phoenix suburb in March. It was the first death involving a fully autonomous vehicle. A backup driver was at the wheel. Waymo, a self-driving car spinoff from a Google project, has been offering free rides in robotic vehicles with no backup driver as part of a test program in the Phoenix area for the past year. Earlier this month, Waymo launched a ride-hailing service available to about 200 people that will have a person behind the wheel in case something goes awry. Giannonatti of Kroger said safety is paramount in this next step of autonomous vehicle technology. Because Nuro’s R1 delivery vehicle is unmanned, it was designed to prioritize safety of other drivers and pedestrians without trading off the safety or comfort of a driver or passengers, Ferguson said. The vehicle’s size — half the width of a Toyota Corolla — also helps prevent collisions with pedestrians because there’s more buffer room, he said.Kroger has been working to boost online sales to keep up with Walmart and Amazon, which bought grocer Whole Foods last year. Tuesday’s announcement puts Kroger ahead of Walmart and Amazon in self-driving deliveries, says Jon Reily, vice president of commerce strategy at Publicis.Sapient. “But ultimately,” he says, “there are so many challenges with autonomous vehicles” to make it a reality nationwide. Among them: state laws and weather. Arizona’s laws have been friendlier to self-driving vehicles, and the weather in Scottsdale is more predictable than in other parts of the country. Associated Press journalists Brian Skoloff in Scottsdale, Arizona, Terry Tang in Phoenix, Joseph Pisani in New York and Michael Liedtke in San Francisco contributed to this story.
19 Dec 18
The Mercury News
By CATHY BUSSEWITZ | Associated Press The nation’s largest grocery chain stepped into the driverless delivery market Tuesday, bringing milk, eggs and other items to a customer’s home in a vehicle with nobody at the wheel. Although limited to delivering within about a mile of one Arizona supermarket owned by Kroger Co., it represents the latest step for industries trying to lower delivery costs of everyday items and those trying to launch self-driving cars on public roads. Tuesday’s delivery arrived at Shannon Baggett’s house in the Phoenix suburb of Scottsdale. She was already receiving groceries weekly from larger, manned self-driving vehicles that the company Nuro developed and launched in August. She said it was surreal to see nobody in the car bringing her milk, eggs and strawberries. “It was very cool to see it pull up. It was a lot smaller than I thought it would be,” Baggett said. “I told my husband, ‘We just got our groceries delivered by a robot.’ ” But Tuesday’s launch also highlighted some of the many challenges still ahead for autonomous vehicles: One of the compact cars didn’t drive as planned at a media demonstration because of a dead battery and had to be pushed up a ramp and onto a truck by several men. Kroger and Nuro, which is based in Mountain View, announced Tuesday that they would deliver groceries in the Scottsdale area, using an autonomous vehicle called the R1, which has no steering wheel and no seats for people. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Nuro will be adding two of its completely unmanned R1 vehicles to its fleet of manned self-driving vehicles that deliver groceries, said Dave Ferguson, president and co-founder of Nuro. When summoned, the R1 will travel within a 1-mile radius of the Fry’s Food store just east of the Phoenix Zoo at speeds up to 25 miles per hour on residential roads but stay clear of main roads or highways, according to Pam Giannonatti, corporate affairs manager at Cincinnati-based Kroger’s Fry’s division. Customers place an order on their smartphone or laptop and get a text message when the groceries are on their way. Another message will alert them when the delivery is curbside. Once the vehicle arrives, the customer will receive a code to punch in to open the doors, Giannonatti said. Customers will pay a flat fee of $5.95 and can request same-day or next-day delivery. The unmanned delivery vehicles will be followed by a “shadow car,” driven by a person with the ability to stop or control it. This car is being used in the early stages of the program out of caution and will be phased out, Ferguson said. “This is not yet at the point where in any way it’s economically better than just sending someone out in a car to deliver your groceries,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina, who teaches about emerging technologies. “It will probably cost much more, and the range is minimal, and there are lots of ways it would not be a true, commercial-scale, viable deployment, but it’s an important step on that path.” Technological hurdles and apprehension have limited attempts to deploy fully autonomous vehicles on public streets. [dfm_iframe src=”http://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=breaking-mn” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Uber pulled its self-driving cars out of Arizona this year after one of the ride-hailing service’s robotic vehicles hit and killed a woman as she crossed a darkened street in a Phoenix suburb in March. It was the first death involving a fully autonomous vehicle. A backup driver was at the wheel. Waymo, a self-driving car spinoff from a Google project, has been offering free rides in robotic vehicles with no backup driver as part of a test program in the Phoenix area for the past year. Earlier this month, Waymo launched a ride-hailing service available to about 200 people that will have a person behind the wheel in case something goes awry. Giannonatti of Kroger said safety is paramount in this next step of autonomous vehicle technology. Because Nuro’s R1 delivery vehicle is unmanned, it was designed to prioritize safety of other drivers and pedestrians without trading off the safety or comfort of a driver or passengers, Ferguson said. The vehicle’s size — half the width of a Toyota Corolla — also helps prevent collisions with pedestrians because there’s more buffer room, he said. Kroger has been working to boost online sales to keep up with Walmart and Amazon, which bought grocer Whole Foods last year. Tuesday’s announcement puts Kroger ahead of Walmart and Amazon in self-driving deliveries, says Jon Reily, vice president of commerce strategy at Publicis.Sapient. “But ultimately,” he says, “there are so many challenges with autonomous vehicles” to make it a reality nationwide. Among them: state laws and weather. Arizona’s laws have been friendlier to self-driving vehicles, and the weather in Scottsdale is more predictable than in other parts of the country. Associated Press journalists Brian Skoloff in Scottsdale, Arizona, Terry Tang in Phoenix, Joseph Pisani in New York and Michael Liedtke in San Francisco contributed to this story.