Patagonia

23 May 19
The Fat Squirrel Speaks

Squirrel Support Links Finished Objects: Doocot by Kate Davies in Harrisville Designs Nightshades, Insomnia colorway Works in Progress: Pebbles & Pathways Socks by Marceline Smith (Hey BrownBerry Podcast) in Quince & Co. Chickadee, Honey colorway Yoke Emma by Astrid Tueting in Juniper Moon, Patagonia, Juniper, Aquamarine, Mustard, and Thistle Ursa by Jacqueline Cieslak in Stacy […]

23 May 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
By Gillian Brockell | The Washington Post The new Statue of Liberty Museum opening Thursday in New York Harbor boasts a number of treasures: the original torch, which was replaced in the 1980s; an unoxidized (read: not green) copper replica of Lady Liberty’s face; and recordings of immigrants describing the sight of the 305-foot monument. It also revives an aspect of the statue’s long-forgotten history: Lady Liberty was originally designed to celebrate the end of slavery, not the arrival of immigrants. Ellis Island, the inspection station through which million of immigrants passed, didn’t open until six years after the statue was unveiled in 1886. The plaque with the famous Emma Lazarus poem wasn’t added until 1903. “One of the first meanings [of the statue] had to do with abolition, but it’s a meaning that didn’t stick,” Edward Berenson, a history professor at New York University and author of the book “The Statue of Liberty: A Transatlantic Story,” said in an interview with The Washington Post. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The monument, which draws 4.5 million visitors a year, was first imagined by a man named Édouard de Laboulaye. In France, he was an expert on the U.S. Constitution and, at the close of the American Civil War, the president of a committee that raised and disbursed funds to newly freed slaves, according to Yasmin Sabina Khan, author of the book “Enlightening the World: The Creation of the Statue of Liberty.“ Laboulaye loved America – often giving speeches described by a New York Times correspondent in 1867 as “feasts of liberty which move the souls of men to their deepest depths” – and he loved it even more when slavery was abolished. In June 1865, Laboulaye organized a meeting of French abolitionists at his summer home in Versailles, Berenson said. The original torch and flame, and a full-scale face model, are displayed in the new Statue of Liberty Museum in New York. (Richard Drew/AP) “They talked about the idea of creating some kind of commemorative gift that would recognize the importance of the liberation of the slaves,” Berenson said. Laboulaye secured the partnership of sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, who took his sweet time developing an idea. An early model, circa 1870, shows Lady Liberty with her right arm in the position we are familiar with, raised and illuminating the world with a torch. But in her left hand she holds broken shackles, an homage to the end of slavery. (A terra cotta model still survives at the Museum of the City of New York.) One theory has her face being adapted from a statue Bartholdi had proposed for the Suez Canal, meaning her visage could resemble that of an Egyptian woman. The Times reported she was based on the Roman goddess Libertas, who typically wore the type of cap worn by freed Roman slaves. In the final model, Lady Liberty holds a tablet inscribed with the Roman numerals for July 4, 1776. The broken chains are still there though, beneath her feet, “but they’re not all that visible,” Berenson said. Left: An undated photo of French abolitionist Édouard de Laboulaye. Right: Sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi in 1880. (National Library of France; Smithsonian Institution) Bartholdi made a number of trips to the U.S. to whip up support for his colossal structure, according to the National Park Service. And sailing into New York Harbor, he spotted the perfect location for it: Bedloe’s Island, then occupied by the crumbling Fort Wood. Fundraising in both France and the United States took awhile, and according to the NPS, Bartholdi cast the project in the broadest terms possible to widen the net of potential donors. He also built the torch-bearing arm to tour around and inspire people to open up their wallets. Bartholdi finished building the statue in Paris in 1884. Two years later, he oversaw its reconstruction in New York. “Liberty Enlightening the World” was “unveiled” on Oct. 28, 1886 – but that did not involve a very big sheet. Instead, there were fireworks, a military parade, and Bartholdi climbing to the top and pulling a French flag from his muse’s face. By then, “the original meaning of the abolition of slavery had pretty much gotten lost,” Berenson said, going unmentioned in newspaper coverage. Left to right: The bust of the Statue of Liberty on display in Paris in 1884 before it was shipped to the United States. The statue towers over Paris rooftops in 1884. The right arm of the statue on display in Philadelphia in 1876. (AP) In fact, black newspapers railed against it as meaningless and hypocritical. By 1886, Reconstruction had been crushed, the Supreme Court had rolled back civil rights protections, and Jim Crow laws were tightening their grip. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]In his book, Berenson quotes an 1886 editorial in the black newspaper the Cleveland Gazette: “Shove the Bartholdi statue, torch and all, into the ocean until the ‘liberty’ of this country is such as to make it possible for an industrious and inoffensive colored man in the South to earn a respectable living for himself and family . . . The idea of the ‘liberty’ of this country ‘enlightening the world,’ or even Patagonia, is ridiculous in the extreme.” W.E.B. Du Bois also mentioned this in his autobiography, recalling seeing the statue upon arriving back in the United States in 1894 after two years in Europe: “I know not what multitude of emotions surged in the others, but I had to recall [a] mischievous little French girl whose eyes twinkled as she said: ‘Oh, yes, the Statue of Liberty! With its back toward America, and its face toward France!’” There were immigrants on board that ship with Du Bois, but he didn’t talk to any of them. The ship was segregated.
23 May 19
The Mercury News
By Gillian Brockell | The Washington Post The new Statue of Liberty Museum opening Thursday in New York Harbor boasts a number of treasures: the original torch, which was replaced in the 1980s; an unoxidized (read: not green) copper replica of Lady Liberty’s face; and recordings of immigrants describing the sight of the 305-foot monument. It also revives an aspect of the statue’s long-forgotten history: Lady Liberty was originally designed to celebrate the end of slavery, not the arrival of immigrants. Ellis Island, the inspection station through which million of immigrants passed, didn’t open until six years after the statue was unveiled in 1886. The plaque with the famous Emma Lazarus poem wasn’t added until 1903. “One of the first meanings [of the statue] had to do with abolition, but it’s a meaning that didn’t stick,” Edward Berenson, a history professor at New York University and author of the book “The Statue of Liberty: A Transatlantic Story,” said in an interview with The Washington Post. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The monument, which draws 4.5 million visitors a year, was first imagined by a man named Édouard de Laboulaye. In France, he was an expert on the U.S. Constitution and, at the close of the American Civil War, the president of a committee that raised and disbursed funds to newly freed slaves, according to Yasmin Sabina Khan, author of the book “Enlightening the World: The Creation of the Statue of Liberty.” Laboulaye loved America – often giving speeches described by a New York Times correspondent in 1867 as “feasts of liberty which move the souls of men to their deepest depths” – and he loved it even more when slavery was abolished. In June 1865, Laboulaye organized a meeting of French abolitionists at his summer home in Versailles, Berenson said. The original torch and flame, and a full-scale face model, are displayed in the new Statue of Liberty Museum in New York. (Richard Drew/AP) “They talked about the idea of creating some kind of commemorative gift that would recognize the importance of the liberation of the slaves,” Berenson said. Laboulaye secured the partnership of sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, who took his sweet time developing an idea. An early model, circa 1870, shows Lady Liberty with her right arm in the position we are familiar with, raised and illuminating the world with a torch. But in her left hand she holds broken shackles, an homage to the end of slavery. (A terra cotta model still survives at the Museum of the City of New York.) One theory has her face being adapted from a statue Bartholdi had proposed for the Suez Canal, meaning her visage could resemble that of an Egyptian woman. The Times reported she was based on the Roman goddess Libertas, who typically wore the type of cap worn by freed Roman slaves. In the final model, Lady Liberty holds a tablet inscribed with the Roman numerals for July 4, 1776. The broken chains are still there though, beneath her feet, “but they’re not all that visible,” Berenson said. Left: An undated photo of French abolitionist Édouard de Laboulaye. Right: Sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi in 1880. (National Library of France; Smithsonian Institution) Bartholdi made a number of trips to the U.S. to whip up support for his colossal structure, according to the National Park Service. And sailing into New York Harbor, he spotted the perfect location for it: Bedloe’s Island, then occupied by the crumbling Fort Wood. Fundraising in both France and the United States took awhile, and according to the NPS, Bartholdi cast the project in the broadest terms possible to widen the net of potential donors. He also built the torch-bearing arm to tour around and inspire people to open up their wallets. Bartholdi finished building the statue in Paris in 1884. Two years later, he oversaw its reconstruction in New York. “Liberty Enlightening the World” was “unveiled” on Oct. 28, 1886 – but that did not involve a very big sheet. Instead, there were fireworks, a military parade, and Bartholdi climbing to the top and pulling a French flag from his muse’s face. By then, “the original meaning of the abolition of slavery had pretty much gotten lost,” Berenson said, going unmentioned in newspaper coverage. Left to right: The bust of the Statue of Liberty on display in Paris in 1884 before it was shipped to the United States. The statue towers over Paris rooftops in 1884. The right arm of the statue on display in Philadelphia in 1876. (AP) In fact, black newspapers railed against it as meaningless and hypocritical. By 1886, Reconstruction had been crushed, the Supreme Court had rolled back civil rights protections, and Jim Crow laws were tightening their grip. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]In his book, Berenson quotes an 1886 editorial in the black newspaper the Cleveland Gazette: “Shove the Bartholdi statue, torch and all, into the ocean until the ‘liberty’ of this country is such as to make it possible for an industrious and inoffensive colored man in the South to earn a respectable living for himself and family . . . The idea of the ‘liberty’ of this country ‘enlightening the world,’ or even Patagonia, is ridiculous in the extreme.” W.E.B. Du Bois also mentioned this in his autobiography, recalling seeing the statue upon arriving back in the United States in 1894 after two years in Europe: “I know not what multitude of emotions surged in the others, but I had to recall [a] mischievous little French girl whose eyes twinkled as she said: ‘Oh, yes, the Statue of Liberty! With its back toward America, and its face toward France!'” There were immigrants on board that ship with Du Bois, but he didn’t talk to any of them. The ship was segregated.
23 May 19
East Bay Times
By Gillian Brockell | The Washington Post The new Statue of Liberty Museum opening Thursday in New York Harbor boasts a number of treasures: the original torch, which was replaced in the 1980s; an unoxidized (read: not green) copper replica of Lady Liberty’s face; and recordings of immigrants describing the sight of the 305-foot monument. It also revives an aspect of the statue’s long-forgotten history: Lady Liberty was originally designed to celebrate the end of slavery, not the arrival of immigrants. Ellis Island, the inspection station through which million of immigrants passed, didn’t open until six years after the statue was unveiled in 1886. The plaque with the famous Emma Lazarus poem wasn’t added until 1903. “One of the first meanings [of the statue] had to do with abolition, but it’s a meaning that didn’t stick,” Edward Berenson, a history professor at New York University and author of the book “The Statue of Liberty: A Transatlantic Story,” said in an interview with The Washington Post. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The monument, which draws 4.5 million visitors a year, was first imagined by a man named Édouard de Laboulaye. In France, he was an expert on the U.S. Constitution and, at the close of the American Civil War, the president of a committee that raised and disbursed funds to newly freed slaves, according to Yasmin Sabina Khan, author of the book “Enlightening the World: The Creation of the Statue of Liberty.“ Laboulaye loved America – often giving speeches described by a New York Times correspondent in 1867 as “feasts of liberty which move the souls of men to their deepest depths” – and he loved it even more when slavery was abolished. In June 1865, Laboulaye organized a meeting of French abolitionists at his summer home in Versailles, Berenson said. The original torch and flame, and a full-scale face model, are displayed in the new Statue of Liberty Museum in New York. (Richard Drew/AP) “They talked about the idea of creating some kind of commemorative gift that would recognize the importance of the liberation of the slaves,” Berenson said. Laboulaye secured the partnership of sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, who took his sweet time developing an idea. An early model, circa 1870, shows Lady Liberty with her right arm in the position we are familiar with, raised and illuminating the world with a torch. But in her left hand she holds broken shackles, an homage to the end of slavery. (A terra cotta model still survives at the Museum of the City of New York.) One theory has her face being adapted from a statue Bartholdi had proposed for the Suez Canal, meaning her visage could resemble that of an Egyptian woman. The Times reported she was based on the Roman goddess Libertas, who typically wore the type of cap worn by freed Roman slaves. In the final model, Lady Liberty holds a tablet inscribed with the Roman numerals for July 4, 1776. The broken chains are still there though, beneath her feet, “but they’re not all that visible,” Berenson said. Left: An undated photo of French abolitionist Édouard de Laboulaye. Right: Sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi in 1880. (National Library of France; Smithsonian Institution) Bartholdi made a number of trips to the U.S. to whip up support for his colossal structure, according to the National Park Service. And sailing into New York Harbor, he spotted the perfect location for it: Bedloe’s Island, then occupied by the crumbling Fort Wood. Fundraising in both France and the United States took awhile, and according to the NPS, Bartholdi cast the project in the broadest terms possible to widen the net of potential donors. He also built the torch-bearing arm to tour around and inspire people to open up their wallets. Bartholdi finished building the statue in Paris in 1884. Two years later, he oversaw its reconstruction in New York. “Liberty Enlightening the World” was “unveiled” on Oct. 28, 1886 – but that did not involve a very big sheet. Instead, there were fireworks, a military parade, and Bartholdi climbing to the top and pulling a French flag from his muse’s face. By then, “the original meaning of the abolition of slavery had pretty much gotten lost,” Berenson said, going unmentioned in newspaper coverage. Left to right: The bust of the Statue of Liberty on display in Paris in 1884 before it was shipped to the United States. The statue towers over Paris rooftops in 1884. The right arm of the statue on display in Philadelphia in 1876. (AP) In fact, black newspapers railed against it as meaningless and hypocritical. By 1886, Reconstruction had been crushed, the Supreme Court had rolled back civil rights protections, and Jim Crow laws were tightening their grip. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]In his book, Berenson quotes an 1886 editorial in the black newspaper the Cleveland Gazette: “Shove the Bartholdi statue, torch and all, into the ocean until the ‘liberty’ of this country is such as to make it possible for an industrious and inoffensive colored man in the South to earn a respectable living for himself and family . . . The idea of the ‘liberty’ of this country ‘enlightening the world,’ or even Patagonia, is ridiculous in the extreme.” W.E.B. Du Bois also mentioned this in his autobiography, recalling seeing the statue upon arriving back in the United States in 1894 after two years in Europe: “I know not what multitude of emotions surged in the others, but I had to recall [a] mischievous little French girl whose eyes twinkled as she said: ‘Oh, yes, the Statue of Liberty! With its back toward America, and its face toward France!’” There were immigrants on board that ship with Du Bois, but he didn’t talk to any of them. The ship was segregated.
23 May 19
Stickety Sweeet

The beauty of Glacier National Park in Patagonia Beautiful Paintings on eBay!

23 May 19
Appalachian Adventure

With the trail so quiet during Trail Days (the youngsters are now all back on the trail racing to make up miles lost during their triple zero day) I have been thinking about all the interesting people we have met. Before we even started the actual AT, while we were still hiking the Approach Trail, […]

23 May 19
Men's Journal
With summer right around the corner, we’re already grabbing our keys and getting ready to hit the road. But this year, we’re going global. For our new June issue—out on newsstands everywhere this week—we scoured the map and selected the World’s Greatest Road Trips, covering ground and upping the mileage from a South African beach cruise to a journey across Patagonia to The Everest of Road Trips—all embracing the spirit of adventure. As Men’s Journal editor-in-chief Greg Emmanuel puts it: “Driving in the U.S. has a lot to offer, but when you go where the signs are different, the rules of the road are different, and even the snacks are different, it really ups the ante.” But we’re not the only ones you can probably find out on the highway this season. A few days into his epic 2,800-mile trek from Austin, Texas, all the way to Malibu, we caught up with our new June cover guy, Kyle Chandler, star of the new blockbuster, Godzilla: King of the Monsters, along with Chandler’s road trip buddies: his rescue, Geronimo, and his 16-foot Airstream Sport he named Tookus. [m101-skimlink product_name=”” price=”” type=”price-comparison” button_url=”https://www.mensjournal.com/features/kyle-chandler-cover-story-mens-journal/” button_text=”COVER STORY: KYLE CHANDLER’S RULES OF THE ROAD”] Aside from Godzilla, Chandler also appears as Colonel Cathcart in the new Hulu series, Catch-22. “I was scared to death,” Chandler told us about taking the part. “But my career has been full of these situations where I get opportunities you can’t say no to.” Chandler acts alongside George Clooney, who also produced and directed the series. “He’s one of my favorite actors,” Clooney told us. “He’s the only guy I know who could’ve taken Cathcart from a vindictive buffoon to, by the end, a guy you have sympathy for.” Read the entire cover story here to find out more about Chandler’s new role, his memories traveling with Friday Night Lights’ co-star Connie Britton, and his rules of the road. Want more? We’ve got interviews with George Clinton and Aubrey Plaza, a profile on crime-fiction provocateur James Ellroy, along with gear guides for picking the right commuter bike, campsite cooking, and the perfect gift ideas for Father’s Day.
23 May 19
Grow. Live. Thrive.

Helping you transform your fear of the unknown into knowledge 5 Ways to Get The Gear You Need Borrow from a friend. Friends get it, they care about you and they want to help. So ask. Four years ago I left my marriage with little more than my clothes and a Vitamix. I had to […]

23 May 19
News Directory

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Officials say the Run of the Wall continues the annual running of cross-country motorcycles forward strongly. Many of them were confused by this week's announcement that 2019 is the final year of Rolling Thunder's operation. “Rolling Thunder is the parade of two miles down Avenue Constitution from Patagonia in Washington D.C. which […]

23 May 19
Unemployed and Traveling

Everyone had so many great questions. Enjoy! Are you able to be active while you travel? -Alex C. Very. According to my Apple watch, I am about 3x more active now than I was at home. Dan likes to go to gyms when he can find them, I like to go for long walks and […]