Paul Joe

19 Jul 19
Grizzly Bomb

AMC’s Shudder debuted the first trailer for its new horror anthology series Creepshow ahead of the show’s panel at San Diego Comic-Con today, in addition to the series official streaming date.

19 Jul 19
Twin Cities
Minnesota United goalkeeper Vito Mannone had to make a nearly instantaneous transition from furious to focused in order to save a penalty kick and preserve last Saturday’s 1-0 victory over FC Dallas. The Loons’ Italian ‘keeper was extremely upset when he was called for a foul that set up the PK, telling the referee, “ ‘You want to ruin this game.’ I can’t believe it.” A couple of days later, he discussed his reaction. “When I feel like there’s injustice — whether it is or not — I feel like it gives me an extra motivation to make the save and help the team,” Mannone said Tuesday. Mannone immediately recalled his film study of Reto Ziegler’s penalty kick habits, while also trying to throw Ziegler off with his own actions. “It’s a poker game,” Mannone said. “Starting my position maybe a little bit wider and coming in the center. Giving him some part of the goal, give him a think.” Mannone knew Ziegler had a recent history of going to Mannone’s left, but Ziegler’s run up to the ball told him that placement would be tough to pull off. Mannone tried to wait as long as he could before reacting to the shot coming at him with pace from 12 yards away. Mannone lunged to his right and stretched his 6-foot frame as long and horizontal as possible. He acknowledged that you have to make a decision, commit to it and not think of the consequences if the ball is placed elsewhere. “If you reach that with your push, you cover big parts of the goal,” he said. “If they change and they go top corner. (Shrugs.) It depends on the day what they do. It’s difficult. You need to react in a certain area and not get beat there.” Mannone, who gave up goals on two PKs earlier this season, got his hands on Ziegler’s shot on the bottom corner to help the Loons win their fourth straight MLS game. Minnesota (10-7-3) now takes that streak on the road to face Real Sale Lake (9-9-2) in an important Western Conference game at 9 p.m. Saturday. Philadelphia midfielder Jamiro Monteiro (35) scores on a penalty kick against Minnesota goalkeeper Vito Mannone (1) during the first half of an MLS Soccer game at Allianz Field in St. Paul on Sunday, June 2, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press) In its MLS era since the beginning of the 2017 season, Minnesota has been a part of 27 penalty kicks, with 23 becoming goals. Loons midfielders Kevin Molino, Darwin Quintero and Ethan Finlay have converted on 90 percent of penalties taken (9 of 10). Molino is the only one to be denied. United goalkeepers John Alvbage, Bobby Shuttleworth, Matt Lampson and Vito Mannone have saved 18 percent (3 of 17). Shuttleworth had two saves in 2017 before Mannone’s last weekend. Mannone knows the significance of Saturday’s save and puts it near the top of his career bests. When Mannone was with English club Sunderland in 2014, he made a shootout save to help beat mega-club Manchester United at Old Trafford in the second leg of the Capital One Cup semifinal. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “(It) was something incredible for me,” Mannone recalled. “It’s the biggest game for the cup … and it’s pretty similar to our story (in Minnesota). We get to the semifinal (in the U.S. Open Cup on Aug. 7). I’m hoping to make that kind of run and go all the way this time and win it because we didn’t win against (Manchester) City in the finals” in 2014. On Saturday’s drama, Mannone defected some credit to the rest of the Loons; they were tired from their fifth game in 15 days and found a way to create a stoppage-time goal from Mason Toye only minutes earlier. “It’s just a moment, my moment,” Mannone said. “But I share it with the team because it’s brilliant the effort that we put in and now we try to recover and go again Saturday for the eight wins.” Minnesota United’s MLS history with penalties 2017 March 3 — Portland’s Diego Valeri scores on John Alvbage March 12 — Kevin Molino scores on Atlanta’s Alex Kann March 18 — Molino scores on Colorado’s Tim Howard March 25 — New England’s Lee Nguyen scores on Bobby Shuttleworth March 25  — New England’s Chris Tierney scores on Shuttleworth May 13 — Toronto’s Sebastian Giovinco scores on Shuttleworth May 13 — Toronto’s Alex Bono saves Molino shot June 21 — Valeri scores on Shuttleworth June 24 — Vancouver’s Cristian Techera scores on Shuttleworth August 20 — Seattle’s Clint Dempsey scores on Shuttleworth Sept. 16 — Shuttleworth saves Montreal’s Ignacio Piatti shot Sept. 16 — Molino scores on Montreal’s Evan Bush Sept. 23 — Shuttleworth saves Dallas’ Mauro Diaz 2018 March 10 — Orlando’s Yoshi Youth scores on Matt Lampson April 28 — Darwin Quintero scores on Houston’s Joe Willis May 12 — San Jose’s Magnus Ericsson scores on Shuttleworth May 12 — San Jose’s Chris Wondolowski scores on Shuttleworth July 18 — New England’s Diego Fagundez scores on Shuttleworth Aug. 4 — Seattle’s Nicolas Lodiero scores on Shuttleworth 2019 March 2 — Quintero scores on Vancouver’s Maxime Crepeau March 9 — Quintero scores on San Jose’s Daniel Vega March 16 — Los Angeles’ Jonathan dos Santos scores on Vito Mannone March 30 — Quintero scores on New England’s Cody Cropper April 19 — Quintero scores on Toronto’s Alex Bono June 2 — Philadelphia’s Jamiro Monteiro scores on Mannone July 6 — Ethan Finlay scores on Montreal’s Evan Bush July 13 — Mannone saves Dallas’ Reto Ziegler shot
19 Jul 19
Global News

“Dumbfakes” are simpler and more easily unmasked bogus videos, and they are easy and often cheap to produce.

19 Jul 19
Real News Reports-Start Your Day Here

Sophisticated phony videos called deepfakes have attracted plenty of attention as a possible threat to election integrity. But a bigger problem for the 2020 U.S. presidential contest may be “dumbfakes” — simpler and more easily unmasked bogus videos that are easy and often cheap to produce.Unlike deepfakes, which require sophisticated artificial intelligence, audio manipulation and…

19 Jul 19
bengmharris

On the one night of the year where WWE goes extreme, WWE did not go so extreme (in Philadelphia of all places). Out of the ten matches on the card, only three were ‘extreme’ matches with others such as the WWE Championship match being regular matches. This odd card only adds fuel to the long-term […]

19 Jul 19
rotisserieduckdotcom

In last month’s MLB Draft, the sons of Glenn Hoffman, Jason LaRue, Dave Roberts, Jose Cruz Jr., Rusty Greer, Jerry Dipoto, Roy Halladay, Paul Byrd, Randy Ready, Travis Fryman, Al Leiter, Joe Randa, Shane Reynolds, Jay Bell, Rodney McCray, Glenallen Hill and Bobby Witt were among the players chosen. In our last visit, we talked […]

19 Jul 19
Azusa Report

The following is the list of some of the most asked questions about his history in revival and world evangelism. I hope this helps people understand why I was “branded for Fire.” (Richard, that is for you!)

19 Jul 19
KX NEWS
Sophisticated phony videos called deepfakes have attracted plenty of attention as a possible threat to election integrity. But a bigger problem for the 2020 U.S. presidential contest may be “dumbfakes” — simpler and more easily unmasked bogus videos that are easy and often cheap to produce. Unlike deepfakes, which require sophisticated artificial intelligence, audio manipulation and facial mapping technology, dumbfakes can be made simply by varying the speed of video or selective editing. They are easier to create and can be convincing to an unsuspecting viewer, which makes them a much more immediate worry. A slowed-down video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that made her appear impaired garnered more than 2 million views on Facebook in May. In November, then-White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted a sped-up video of CNN reporter Jim Acosta that made him look more aggressive than he was during an exchange with an intern. Her post received thousands of retweets. The fact that these videos are made so easily and then widely shared across social media platforms does not bode well for 2020, said Hany Farid, a digital forensics expert at the University of California, Berkeley. “The clock is ticking,” Farid said. “The Nancy Pelosi video was a canary in a coal mine.” Social media companies don’t have clear-cut policies banning fake videos, in part because they don’t want to be in the position of deciding whether something is satire or intended to mislead people — or both. Doing so could also open them to charges of censorship or political bias. Facebook, however, will “downrank” false or misleading posts — including videos — so that fewer people will see them. Such material will also be paired with fact checks produced by outside organizations, including The Associated Press. There are also vast gray areas depending on political affiliation or your sense of humor. One social media user who calls himself Paul Lee Ticks— a play on the word “politics”— often makes fabricated videos, mostly of President Donald Trump. In one of his most recent video edits, he added a “concentration camps” sign to the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago. Another social media user who goes by the handle Carpe Donktum makes edited videos in support of the president. Following Trump’s June comments that Joe Biden appeared slow, Carpe Donktum slowed down video footage of Biden and spliced two clips, making the former vice president appear to say something he did not. Trump often retweets Carpe Donktum and last week he met the president in person during the White House’s “social media summit” featuring conservatives. Carpe Donktum says he makes parody videos and disputes the notion that his videos are “doctored” because their intent is satirical and the manipulations obvious. “These are memes and have been on the internet since the internet’s inception,” he said. Both Paul Lee Ticks and Carpe Donktum, who spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity due to fear of threats and harassment, started off making videos that were more simplistic and comical. But their videos have become more sophisticated, blurring the line between what is real and fake in a more convincing way for an audience that is unsuspecting or unfamiliar with their comedic style. Concern about these videos is growing among experts, politicians and the general public. During a House Intelligence Committee hearing on June 13, Rep. Adam Schiff, a California Democrat, said the Pelosi video represents the scale of the problem ahead. According to a June Pew Research Center study, 63% of Americans surveyed about made-up news and information said that videos and images altered to mislead the public create a great deal of confusion around the facts of current issues. Other manipulations are equally crude, yet more subtle. Some fake videos, for instance, mislabel authentic historical footage of public unrest or police activity with incorrect dates or locations to falsely suggest they depict breaking news. “Disinformation is so powerful in our levels of political polarization,” said Ohio State University professor Erik Nisbet, who co-authored a study in 2018 that found fake news may have contributed to Trump’s 2016 win. “People are angry, worried and anxious. They are more vulnerable to misinformation and disinformation that validates their feelings.” Demographics also play a role. Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan, said older generations that were raised on mass media “tend to trust video more.” A study published in the Science Advances journal in January found that people over 65 and ultra-conservative were more likely to share false information. Edward Delp, director of the Video and Imaging Processing Laboratory at Purdue University, and his team were able to develop an algorithm to detect deepfakes. Finding ways to protect and authenticate videos, he said, could help minimize the impact of manipulated video. However, video authentication may do little to change people’s views. Farid, the UC Berkeley professor, said with the manipulated Pelosi video, users could easily find the original clips of the House speaker online but people were still willing to believe the false video was real. “If we can’t get it right, I mean the public and Facebook, where are we going to be when we have more complex fakes?” he said.
19 Jul 19
News Directory

<!-> June 26, 2019 Freshman Honor Rolls. The honor rolls tbenefits of interest To be eligible, students have been enrolled for minimum grades. Students are: Alabama Birmingham Wesley T. NietfeldHuntsville Aylin Marie McGough-Peker Alaska Anchorage Nadia S. DororBrenna Judith JohnsonRobert Francis KemperChugiak Samantha A. BurkeEielson Air Force Base Alexandra Nicole SmithFairbanks Catherine PetersonWasilla Elijah R. […]

19 Jul 19

FIRST ONE DOWN: A Paul Sutton Novel Legal Thrillers Author: R.J. Belle, Shawna Graham, Holly Atkinson, Helen Gerth Mahi FREE Cold Case Detective Paul Sutton has dedicated his life to evil. Finding it. Ending it. To bringing justice to the dead and answers to the living. His life is spent straddling the line between the […]

19 Jul 19
WATE
Sophisticated phony videos called deepfakes have attracted plenty of attention as a possible threat to election integrity. But a bigger problem for the 2020 U.S. presidential contest may be “dumbfakes” — simpler and more easily unmasked bogus videos that are easy and often cheap to produce. Unlike deepfakes, which require sophisticated artificial intelligence, audio manipulation and facial mapping technology, dumbfakes can be made simply by varying the speed of video or selective editing. They are easier to create and can be convincing to an unsuspecting viewer, which makes them a much more immediate worry. A slowed-down video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that made her appear impaired garnered more than 2 million views on Facebook in May. In November, then-White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted a sped-up video of CNN reporter Jim Acosta that made him look more aggressive than he was during an exchange with an intern. Her post received thousands of retweets. The fact that these videos are made so easily and then widely shared across social media platforms does not bode well for 2020, said Hany Farid, a digital forensics expert at the University of California, Berkeley. “The clock is ticking,” Farid said. “The Nancy Pelosi video was a canary in a coal mine.” Social media companies don’t have clear-cut policies banning fake videos, in part because they don’t want to be in the position of deciding whether something is satire or intended to mislead people — or both. Doing so could also open them to charges of censorship or political bias. Facebook, however, will “downrank” false or misleading posts — including videos — so that fewer people will see them. Such material will also be paired with fact checks produced by outside organizations, including The Associated Press. There are also vast gray areas depending on political affiliation or your sense of humor. One social media user who calls himself Paul Lee Ticks— a play on the word “politics”— often makes fabricated videos, mostly of President Donald Trump. In one of his most recent video edits, he added a “concentration camps” sign to the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago. Another social media user who goes by the handle Carpe Donktum makes edited videos in support of the president. Following Trump’s June comments that Joe Biden appeared slow, Carpe Donktum slowed down video footage of Biden and spliced two clips, making the former vice president appear to say something he did not. Trump often retweets Carpe Donktum and last week he met the president in person during the White House’s “social media summit” featuring conservatives. Carpe Donktum says he makes parody videos and disputes the notion that his videos are “doctored” because their intent is satirical and the manipulations obvious. “These are memes and have been on the internet since the internet’s inception,” he said. Both Paul Lee Ticks and Carpe Donktum, who spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity due to fear of threats and harassment, started off making videos that were more simplistic and comical. But their videos have become more sophisticated, blurring the line between what is real and fake in a more convincing way for an audience that is unsuspecting or unfamiliar with their comedic style. Concern about these videos is growing among experts, politicians and the general public. During a House Intelligence Committee hearing on June 13, Rep. Adam Schiff, a California Democrat, said the Pelosi video represents the scale of the problem ahead. According to a June Pew Research Center study , 63% of Americans surveyed about made-up news and information said that videos and images altered to mislead the public create a great deal of confusion around the facts of current issues. Other manipulations are equally crude, yet more subtle. Some fake videos, for instance, mislabel authentic historical footage of public unrest or police activity with incorrect dates or locations to falsely suggest they depict breaking news. “Disinformation is so powerful in our levels of political polarization,” said Ohio State University professor Erik Nisbet, who co-authored a study in 2018 that found fake news may have contributed to Trump’s 2016 win. “People are angry, worried and anxious. They are more vulnerable to misinformation and disinformation that validates their feelings.” Demographics also play a role. Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan, said older generations that were raised on mass media “tend to trust video more.” A study published in the Science Advances journal in January found that people over 65 and ultra-conservative were more likely to share false information. Edward Delp, director of the Video and Imaging Processing Laboratory at Purdue University, and his team were able to develop an algorithm to detect deepfakes. Finding ways to protect and authenticate videos, he said, could help minimize the impact of manipulated video. However, video authentication may do little to change people’s views. Farid, the UC Berkeley professor, said with the manipulated Pelosi video, users could easily find the original clips of the House speaker online but people were still willing to believe the false video was real. “If we can’t get it right, I mean the public and Facebook, where are we going to be when we have more complex fakes?” he said.
19 Jul 19
Sport Archives

That day, at his parents' house near Hackensack, it was not Booker's physical traits that impressed the assembled people. It was his maturity and his way of behaving with Holtz. After the interview, Jim Miceli, Booker High School coach, remembers his wife bending over saying, "You know what? This kid could be president someday." Booker […]