Pendleton

18 Feb 19
KTLA

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18 Feb 19
KTLA

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18 Feb 19
L.M. Durand

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different Top 10 theme each week.  This week’s topic is Books with Fewer than 2,000 ratings on Goodreads that I loved. I must say this was not easy but I managed to gather some real little gems here.

18 Feb 19
KTLA

[ooyala player_id=”f987944e2b8d47c5ad7da7977780b8bd” auto=”true” width=”1920″ height=”1080″ pcode=”9vOTQyOvfOKTDwM65FXm0S1biBeX” code=”BpeDhhaDE62x9wIxahKMK-lWM9Sm4oSb”] Designer and Lifestyle Expert Katie Kime joined us live with great ideas on how to throw your own Oscar party at home. For more information on Katie Kime you can go to her website or follow her on Instagram @Katie_Kime For the printables Katie talked about in the segment, […]

18 Feb 19
Linens and Textiles (1930-Now)

Pendleton Blanket Elders Circle of Life 64″ x 78″ – Buy – Pendleton Blanket Elders Circle of Life 64″ x 78″

18 Feb 19
KTLA

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18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Researchers have discovered a group of rare owls thriving in a nature preserve near Los Angeles International Airport, according to a newspaper report Sunday. The 10 burrowing owls are the most seen at LAX Dunes Preserve in 40 years, the Los Angeles Times reported. Among the raptors are a breeding pair that stand guard over a nest. “This is very exciting — a real stunner,” said Pete Bloom, a biologist and avian expert who helped conduct a wildlife survey this month. Scientists attribute the return of the migratory owls to ongoing restoration work at the 300-acre (120-hectare) preserve that used to be the beachfront community of Surfridge. The neighborhoods disappeared decades ago as the jet age boomed and have been reclaimed by sand, native brush and invasive weeds. “For biologists, the preserve has become an ecological hot spot sandwiched between a popular beach and the third-busiest airport in the nation,” said Robert Fisher, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist. “We aim to make sure things stay that way.” The range of biodiversity in the landscape, which is off-limits to the public, underscores the difficulty that government wildlife biologists face ensuring the survival of rare species in an urban setting, the newspaper said. Biologists believe there is a chance that juvenile burrowing owls might become permanent residents of the preserve, which is just one small fragment of a dune system that once stretched along the Pacific Coast from Point Conception, west of Santa Barbara, to Mexico. It is already home to 900 species of plants and animals, including thousands of federally endangered El Segundo blue butterflies, whose numbers were in steep decline due to habitat loss. Other species on the rebound in the isolated dunes include native evening primrose and California gnatcatcher. A recent survey of the federally protected bird found three pairs and six juveniles. Federal scientists are discussing proposals to reintroduce animals that roamed the dunes a century ago but are no longer there, the Times said. One candidate could be the Pacific pocket mouse, a critically endangered mammal previously found only on a gun range at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, about 115 miles (185 kilometers) south.
18 Feb 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
25 YEARS AGO China walnut plant grown in Chico In China, in the province of Shanxi, in the city of Taiyuan, about 250 miles from the Yellow Sea, construction of a walnut processing plant is under way. Roughly 90 percent of the equipment to make the plant comes from agriculture equipment manufacturer Gene M. Jessee Inc., located on Nord Avenue in Chico. The Chico company produced a $200,000 processing system for San Jose-based Food Pro International, which is building the plant. Gene M. Jessee designed the equipment, and manufactured or bought and reconditioned equipment for the plant. Gene M. Jessee has produced other food processing equipment for Food Pro, according to Gale Wells of Chico, who designed the line of walnut-cracking equipment. The system took 12 weeks to produce, and took three 8x8x40-foot containers to ship. … The locally made equipment replaces the hand processing being done at the Chinese plant, in which walnutsa re broken and the meat picked out by hand. The system – prewired, assembled in Chico, inspected and then disassembled for shipment – includes an electrical package, elevator, four cracking machines and separation bins. … — Chico Enterprise-Record, February 19, 1994 50 YEARS AGO Kauffman’s Will Move to Plaza Kauffman’s IXL Men’s Store, located in downtown Chico at 218 Main St. for 16 years, will move to North Valley Plaza Shopping Center, according to an announcement made today by General Manager Robert S. Kauffman of the firm. The store at the Plaza, to be located between Grinage’s and Montgomery Ward, opposite Roos-Atkins, will be ready for occupancy sometime this coming spring. The new NVP store will provide Kauffman’s with over 6,000 square feet of selling space and will feature the latest in modern display fixtures. The Kauffman men’s store chain was founded 46 years ago in Sacramento by Harry Kauffman who still remains active in the business. Robert S. Kauffman and his brother, Norman D. Kauffman, are managers of the seven store chain. Other store locations are in Sacramento, Marysville, Modesto and Santa Maria. The new NVP store will carry many of the famous brand names in the men’s industry including Hart, Schafner & Marx, Worsted-Tex, Pendleton, Rough Rider, Arrow, Jantzen, MacGregor, Interwoven, A-1, Hagger and Levi’s. … — Chico Enterprise-Record, February 22, 1969 75 YEARS AGO Retailers Receive Ration Tokens For Feb. 27 Use Chico retail grocers and butchers are now receiving from local banks supplies of ration tokens for use when the simplified food rationing program goes into effect on Feb. 27. According to the Chico War Price and Rationing Board, each merchant will be given several hundred blue tokens to be used in making change for blue stamps when processed foods are purchased and a supply of  red tokens to be used in making change for red stamps. All blue and red stamps in Ration Book Four will have a flat value of 10 points each. Blue stamps A8, B8, C8, D8 and E8, totaling 50 points, will be valid for purchase of processed foods. Red stamps, A8, B8 and C8 become valid February 27 and red stamps D8, E8 and F8 become valid March 12, totaling 60 points for the month of March, to be used in purchasing meats, fats and oils. Both sets of stamps will be valid until May 20. … — Chico Daily Enterprise, February 23 , 1944 100 YEARS AGO Enlistment Week Home Garden Army 600 Volunteers Enlistment work for the Home Garden Army which has been organized by the government to carry on the work of food conservation started during the war, has resulted in the enlistment of 600 boys and girls, according to information given out this morning by Charles H.Camper and Martin H. Singer, directors for the Chico community. Camper reports that in some schools the classes are going 100 percent in enlistments. While most of the children have garden ground available for the growth of vegetables, it is stated that the children who care to grow vegetables in boxes are admitted to the home garden army, and will receive a U.S.S.G. badge like the others. … Last year the chamber of commerce was kind enough to secure various vacant lots for work, but the result was unsatisfactory because of agricultural conditions. The children this year will be under the guidance in their planting by Martin Singer or by boys of the agricultural department of the high school. — Chico Daily Enterprise, February 18, 1919
18 Feb 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Researchers have discovered a group of rare owls thriving in a nature preserve near Los Angeles International Airport, according to a newspaper report Sunday. The 10 burrowing owls are the most seen at LAX Dunes Preserve in 40 years, the Los Angeles Times reported. Among the raptors are a breeding pair that stand guard over a nest. “This is very exciting — a real stunner,” said Pete Bloom, a biologist and avian expert who helped conduct a wildlife survey this month. Scientists attribute the return of the migratory owls to ongoing restoration work at the 300-acre (120-hectare) preserve that used to be the beachfront community of Surfridge. The neighborhoods disappeared decades ago as the jet age boomed and have been reclaimed by sand, native brush and invasive weeds. “For biologists, the preserve has become an ecological hot spot sandwiched between a popular beach and the third-busiest airport in the nation,” said Robert Fisher, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist. “We aim to make sure things stay that way.” The range of biodiversity in the landscape, which is off-limits to the public, underscores the difficulty that government wildlife biologists face ensuring the survival of rare species in an urban setting, the newspaper said. Biologists believe there is a chance that juvenile burrowing owls might become permanent residents of the preserve, which is just one small fragment of a dune system that once stretched along the Pacific Coast from Point Conception, west of Santa Barbara, to Mexico. It is already home to 900 species of plants and animals, including thousands of federally endangered El Segundo blue butterflies, whose numbers were in steep decline due to habitat loss. Other species on the rebound in the isolated dunes include native evening primrose and California gnatcatcher. A recent survey of the federally protected bird found three pairs and six juveniles. Federal scientists are discussing proposals to reintroduce animals that roamed the dunes a century ago but are no longer there, the Times said. One candidate could be the Pacific pocket mouse, a critically endangered mammal previously found only on a gun range at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, about 115 miles (185 kilometers) south.
18 Feb 19
Red Bluff Daily News
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Researchers have discovered a group of rare owls thriving in a nature preserve near Los Angeles International Airport, according to a newspaper report Sunday. The 10 burrowing owls are the most seen at LAX Dunes Preserve in 40 years, the Los Angeles Times reported. Among the raptors are a breeding pair that stand guard over a nest. “This is very exciting — a real stunner,” said Pete Bloom, a biologist and avian expert who helped conduct a wildlife survey this month. Scientists attribute the return of the migratory owls to ongoing restoration work at the 300-acre (120-hectare) preserve that used to be the beachfront community of Surfridge. The neighborhoods disappeared decades ago as the jet age boomed and have been reclaimed by sand, native brush and invasive weeds. “For biologists, the preserve has become an ecological hot spot sandwiched between a popular beach and the third-busiest airport in the nation,” said Robert Fisher, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist. “We aim to make sure things stay that way.” The range of biodiversity in the landscape, which is off-limits to the public, underscores the difficulty that government wildlife biologists face ensuring the survival of rare species in an urban setting, the newspaper said. Biologists believe there is a chance that juvenile burrowing owls might become permanent residents of the preserve, which is just one small fragment of a dune system that once stretched along the Pacific Coast from Point Conception, west of Santa Barbara, to Mexico. It is already home to 900 species of plants and animals, including thousands of federally endangered El Segundo blue butterflies, whose numbers were in steep decline due to habitat loss. Other species on the rebound in the isolated dunes include native evening primrose and California gnatcatcher. A recent survey of the federally protected bird found three pairs and six juveniles. Federal scientists are discussing proposals to reintroduce animals that roamed the dunes a century ago but are no longer there, the Times said. One candidate could be the Pacific pocket mouse, a critically endangered mammal previously found only on a gun range at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, about 115 miles (185 kilometers) south.