Philanthropy

16 Dec 18
The Denver Post
In 2015, the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It established 17 Sustainable Development Goals that address critical areas of economic, social and environmental development that impact billions of people. These SDGs were ratified by 193 governments and apply to every country — including the United States. The categories are: no poverty; zero hunger; good health and well-being; quality education; gender equality; clean water and sanitation; affordable energy; decent work and economic growth; industry, innovation and infrastructure; reduced inequalities; sustainable cities and communities; responsible consumption and production; climate action; life below water; life on land; strong institutions of peace and justice; and partnership to achieve these goals. Bruce DeBoskey. Alarmingly, three years into the project’s 15-year timetable, the U.N. reports little progress. Funding is trillions of dollars short. The U.S. ranks last among the G20 nations in achieved the SDGs, and 36th among all the countries in the world. Led by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, foundations and other philanthropists are stepping up and committing billions of dollars to achievement of SDGs. There is much more to be done, however, and every philanthropist — whether giving through a family or corporate foundation, donor-advised fund or personal funds — can apply an SDG lens to their giving decisions. Where do we start? Although the giant foundations tend to act globally in their pursuit of the SDGs, it is equally important for the rest of the philanthropic sector to act locally, regionally or nationally. Donors frequently ask, “Where do we start?” Begin by asking this question: “Does our mission or passion align with one or more the SDG goals and targets?” Given the breadth of these issues, the answer is usually “yes.” Identify an SDG. Then, dig deeper to determine the specific targets established within the broader goals — and how these targets mesh with your own interests. Next, since the SDGs address problems much larger than any one funder can tackle, ask: “Who else is focusing on the same issues?” For example, there are several funding collaboratives for the SDG focusing on climate change – such as The Climate and Energy Funders Group and the Climate Works Foundation. For the SDG focused on gender equality, consider the Women’s Funding Network. For the SDG to protect life below water, seeFunding the Ocean. And so on. Once you locate appropriate funding collaboratives, learn about their initiatives and “best practices.” Attend their meetings, read their publications and ascertain how your contribution – at any level in any place –- can help advance the broader SDG goals. Promote the SDG paradigm Ask the beneficiaries of your philanthropy how their work fits into the SDG paradigm. Requesting that even local nonprofits seeking your support align their work with the SDGs enhances awareness of (and focus on) these important issues. This holds true for formal grant application processes as well as less-formal giving efforts. Lastly, communicate your SDG-centric approach on your website or in your newsletters (if you have them) — and in your less-formal communications with other stakeholders in the philanthropic sector. Intentionally incorporate your role in the SDG effort in all communication efforts. Achievement of the U.N. SDGs by 2030 will require that all three legs of the stool – government, business and philanthropy –- do their part. Natalie Ross, Vice-President of External Relations for the Council on Foundations, defines philanthropy’s role as “essential because of what we can bring to these goals — collaboration, engagement with grassroots leaders, a willingness to take risks and leverage resources — which are critical components of global development. Funders should bring this experience and expertise to bear as they work to align their domestic grant-making within a global development framework.” For more information, see SDG Funders and SDG Philanthropy Platform. Nonprofit of the Month Since March, 2012, Food for Thought has helped to address weekend hunger for Denver’s Title One students. Providing a Powersack of nonperishable items to every student in their school, FFT has grown to serving 33 schools and over 10,000 students. FFT is 100% volunteer driven with zero overhead – fueled by impassioned volunteers who insist our children should have this critical component to their growth. https:// foodforthoughtdenver.org Bruce DeBoskey, J.D., is a philanthropic strategist working across the U.S. with The DeBoskey Group to help families, businesses, foundations, and family offices design and implement thoughtful philanthropic strategies and actionable plans. He is a frequent keynote speaker at conferences and workshops on philanthropy. Visit deboskeygroup.com.
16 Dec 18
Russia News Now

© Reuters / Pool Fraud investigators have exposed the Clinton Foundation’s alleged misdeeds in a Congressional hearing, describing it as a de facto “foreign agent” devoted not to charity but to “advancing the personal interests of its principals.” The Clinton Foundation acted as an agent of foreign governments “early in its life and throughout its […]

16 Dec 18
Arcynewsy

Of Christopher Torchia | AP December 16th at 4:19 JOHANNESBURG – A giant statue of a late nineteenth-century white leader with a cane and top hat has been a critical issue for cultural conflicts in South Africa for years. The black protesters threw paint on it. White supporters gathered around it. The authorities surrounded the […]

16 Dec 18
National Post

JOHANNESBURG — A hulking statue of a late 19th century white leader, with a cane and top hat, has been a flashpoint for cultural conflict in South Africa for years. Black protesters threw paint on it. White supporters rallied around it. Authorities surrounded the statue with barbed wire and then ringed it with a more […]

16 Dec 18
Spotlight News

ALBANY — A sure sign the holiday season is here is when hundreds of people strip down to next to nothing and sprint, jog, walk or crawl about 400 meters down Lark Street and then about 400 meters back up. And many of those who opted not to strip down to their skivvies for the […]

16 Dec 18
Sadistic Philanthropy

Laying in bed laughing. Actual event from today: A woman in her 30’s: “What about the buffalo cauliflower?” Me: “So it’s on a bed of brown rice. The cauliflower is lightly battered and then sauteed in hot sauce.” The woman: “Is it spicy?” Me: Can’t hold in, I start chuckling heartily.

16 Dec 18
Russia News Now

It’s about time somebody did a thorough investigation of the Clinton Foundation—it reeks. From Sara A. Carter at saracarter.com: The Clinton Foundation operated as a foreign agent ‘early in its life’ and ‘throughout it’s existence’ and did not operate as a 501c3 charitable foundation as required by its and is not entitled to its status […]

16 Dec 18
Sadistic Philanthropy

work was good not great .. making progress, slowly 💛 didn’t drink until 6pm 👐 now finishing una garrafa de vino at Latin Cafe on Biscayne🍷 given up on meeting a woman, for now .. focusing on my inner ☮ i love my adopted city .. i plan to remain here in Miami the rest […]

16 Dec 18
STRAIGHT LINE LOGIC

It’s about time somebody did a thorough investigation of the Clinton Foundation—it reeks. From Sara A. Carter at saracarter.com: The Clinton Foundation operated as a foreign agent ‘early in its life’ and ‘throughout it’s existence’ and did not operate as a 501c3 charitable foundation as required by its and is not entitled to its status […]

16 Dec 18
The Mercury News
CHICAGO — Masha Chernyak had an epiphany in the back of an Uber, while listening to her fellow passenger, an aspiring tech entrepreneur, gush about his big, game-changing idea. “These guys will give me the elevator pitch for their cat-food delivery app, look me right in the eyes and say they’re going to change the world,” said Chernyak, vice president of programs and policy at the San Francisco-based Latino Community Foundation (LCF). “The many organizations we work with really, truly are changing the world — they just don’t know how to tell that story. Or they’re spending all of their time and effort on their mission and don’t have the capacity or resources to get the help they need to tell that story.” Chernyak told me this on the eve of the pitch night of what she called the first-ever Latino Nonprofit Accelerator. It’s modeled after the technology sector’s strategy of “incubating” small businesses by providing them support to refine their pitch to mentors and investors at what’s known as a Demo Day. With help from Google.org, the San Francisco Foundation and Akonadi Foundation, the LCF has spent the last 16 months funding a small group of organizations, mentoring them on how to grow their outreach and training them on marketing, fundraising and communications skills. “I talk to potential funders all the time and rave about the amazing work these organizations are doing, whether it’s organizing their communities around immigrant rights or increasing civic and political power,” Chernyak said. “But then they go to the organization’s website, and when it’s really unimpressive, they tell me: ‘I’m just not seeing it.’ It became obvious that what these organizations needed was to invest in storytelling, in simple language and in beautiful visuals.” The problem is that, in the world of philanthropy, few funders want to give organizations money to rent space, keep the lights on or hire accountants. Giving money for marketing, photographers, videographers, web developers and designers is even less appealing. The people who hold grantees accountable usually want to make sure every cent goes directly toward fulfilling a stated mission — like teaching young Latinos how to increase their economic power or become future leaders — but this leaves the critical areas of marketing and communications underfunded, even though they can be a key to success. In a quest to fill this void, the LCF decided to invest in nonprofits the Silicon Valley way. During the LCF’s Demo day, organizations that had spent 16 months “incubating” with LCF — learning how to tell the story of how they’re impacting education, workforce development or civic engagement — had three minutes to pitch a panel of potential business mentors and investors. The organizations talked about their readiness to grow, their track record of success and their connection to the communities they serve. By the time the demo was over, the LCF had granted the first prize of $25,000 to an organization called One Day at a Time, which teaches teens leadership and coping skills. The money will go toward continuing the group’s outreach and conflict-resolution services for teens. And, of course, the demo provided the winner and eight other similarly inspiring organizations the opportunity to shine in front of some of Silicon Valley’s most deep-pocketed and influential business leaders. “Yes, we gave away a total of $65,000, and that’s important,” said Chernyak, “but realistically, the money is very limited to creating postcards, one-pagers, annual reports and printing and mailing them, which is in itself huge. The big thing, though, is giving these organizations the opportunity to gain confidence, to be able to speak clearly and passionately about what they do and to inspire funders to invest in projects that are for the community by the community.” The criticism that many grass-roots activists level at large philanthropic entities is that they would rather fund big, established nonprofits to go into neighborhoods to “save” the poor brown people than invest money in community-based groups that are already doing the work on the ground but have few resources to scale up. In fact, only 1.1 percent of philanthropic dollars are now invested in Latino-led nonprofits, according to the LCF. But if more charities take the LCF’s lead by teaching community organizations to market themselves to potential funders the way that sophisticated nonprofits do, the disparity in the number of dollars going to minority-led nonprofits might finally improve. This could result in community leaders of color giving more of their beneficiaries the much-mythologized “hand up” rather than the less lasting “handout.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]And in today’s bootstrapping economy, it can’t come a moment too soon. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]