Playwright

19 Apr 19
Christine Brody

It’s not your typical theater experience at Think BIG! Theater Arts. Some of their most engaged audience members are not sitting still or are even in their seats. Some of their most lively actors don’t have a pulse.  And some of their best direction comes from little ones who still have yet to learn to tie […]

19 Apr 19
Daily Crossword Puzzle Solver

Welcome to Crossword Puzzle Answers. Our website is dedicated to Crossword Answers. We solve all the clues from publishers such as New York Times, LA Times, USA Today etc. Since you arrived at this particular page you are looking for the answer to Independent Uk Cryptic April 20th 2019 Crossword Clues so without wasting your […]

19 Apr 19
Literatist

Solum and Other Plays from Turkey, Serap Erincin (ed.) & Serap Erincin and Mark Ventura (trans.). London: Seagull Books, 2011. ISBN 978-0857420015.*Despite Orhan Pamuk’s Nobel Prize and the relative increase in the interest in Turkish literature following it, little is known about the vast literary output of Turkey in the English-speaking world. Clearly, one of […]

19 Apr 19
Mick Donnellan.

You are invited to the launch of: “Mokusatsu”   A new novel from  Mick Donnellan.  May 5th @ Athlone Castle.  Time: 2pm.    *As Part of the –Poetry in the Park -Monthly Meeting.   Media Contact: Mick Donnellan   E-mail: mickdonnellan@hotmail.com   Tel: (087) 9422942         About Mokusatsu is the long awaited sequel […]

19 Apr 19
12thNight.ca

By Liz Nicholls, 12thnight.ca In a week when inclusivity, tolerance, equality took a major body blow in the Alberta election, it was particularly moving — almost uncanny, really — to see The Empress and the Prime Minister at Theatre Network. The latest from playwright/ actor Darrin Hagen, premiering in a Bradley Moss production, is an […]

19 Apr 19
Hennepin History Museum Blog

On June 28th, 1890 Emma Powers Cranmer had her first and only child named Frances Willard Cranmer in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Emma was an active women’s suffragist that traveled around the United States attending marches and giving speeches. It’s no surprise she named her child after prominent suffragist, Frances Willard. Emma’s daughter Frances would go […]

19 Apr 19
Tales from a Flying Fish

Let the phone and email go unanswered, the post and tweet ignored, the news unchecked, stocks untraded, the appointment missed, the meeting skipped. Let the mailman take the day off.

19 Apr 19
OHIO

Name: Jordan Ramirez Puckett Age: 29 Pronouns: she/her Hometown: San Jose, California  Undergrad: Northwestern University  Favorite play, TV show, movie, album, book, etc: The play that made me want to be a playwright is Baltimore Waltz by Paula Vogel. My favorite video game is Transistor, I actually listened to the soundtrack as I wrote To […]

19 Apr 19
Behind the Curtain Cincinnati

World-premiere comedy TINY HOUSES explores what happens when our world begins to shrink CINCINNATI—Can tiny equal happy? World-premiere comedy TINY HOUSES explores this question beginning May 4 in the Shelterhouse Theatre as four young adults attempt to build a 200-square foot home. With support from The Rosenthal Family Foundation, season sponsor of new work, the play runs through June […]

19 Apr 19
East Bay Times
Playwright Kate Hamill likes to approach classic literature with freewheeling theatricality, with a small cast of actors juggling many roles, often with men playing women and vice versa, in her fast-paced adaptations. Now American Conservatory Theater offers Hamill’s wry take on “Vanity Fair,” the sprawling 1848 novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that follows the fluctuating fortunes of ambitious Becky Sharp, born poor and making her way into high society by her wits, and her privileged and pleasant friend Amelia Sedley. Hamill made her playwriting debut in 2014 with Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility,” which Town Hall Theatre produced in Lafayette last year and which ACT’s MFA students will be performing during the “Vanity Fair” run. Playwright and actress Kate Hamill has been putting her imprint on several literary classics. (Photo courtesy of Kate Hamill) “I had been working as an actor and I was doing OK, but I was very frustrated by the kinds of roles I was auditioning for,” Hamill recalls. “I would see myself in 400 other women in a room auditioning to play someone’s wife or girlfriend or prostitutes, always in service of the male protagonist’s journey. “I wanted to create more opportunities for women, and I felt like if I want this to happen, I may have to do it. That sounds really inspirational and great, but actually I was quite resentful of it. Then I bet my friend $100 I could write a play. At the time I was really poor, so I knew my rent check would bounce if I didn’t write it.” Since then she’s also adapted Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” and “Mansfield Park” and Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” with versions of “The Odyssey” and “The Scarlet Letter” in development. Hamill first read “Vanity Fair” while doing research for another original play. “I found myself really struck by the female characters and the judgment of them within that book,” she says. “I thought, wouldn’t this be an interesting story to explore how we judge people while we ourselves often engaging in questionable conduct? Especially how we judge women, how we want to break them down into a sort of madonna-whore complex. I mentioned it to someone really early on, and he said, ‘Oh, it’s been tried to adapt ‘Vanity Fair.’ It’s impossible.’ And ever since I was a little kid, if you tell me something can’t be done, I’m like, well, I’ll show you!” She kept coming back to that question of judgment while working on this play. “People distance themselves from these stories,” she says. “They feel like the classics are museum pieces and they don’t have much to do with us. The reason why I adapt the classics at all is because I really want to reclaim these stories, which are cultural touchstones for us, which shape us as much as we have shaped them, from a radical feminist perspective. “But I also want to strip the away the comfortable audience remove that makes it so easy to judge characters up on stage. If our own lives were on stage, the petty deceptions and hypocrisies and weaknesses that we all have would just appall us. I’m really interested in how people judge other people and how that shapes society. And I think that’s the particularly true for women.” While she certainly wanted to capture Thackeray’s story, Hamill also felt not just free but obligated to take some liberties with it. “I do a radical kind of adaptation,” she says. “You have to bring your own point of view really strongly to it as a playwright, or else why do it? The theater that I find frustrates me the most is when I have an expectation and it exactly meets that expectation, and nothing about it is challenging or thought provoking. I guess I feel like it’s cynical to not challenge people even a little bit.” Contact Sam Hurwitt at shurwitt@gmail.com, and follow him at Twitter.com/shurwitt. ‘VANITY FAIR’ By Kate Hamill, based on the novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, presented by American Conservatory Theater When: In previews through April 23, main run is April 24-May 12 Where: ACT’s Geary Theater, 415 Geary St., San Francisco Tickets: $15-$110; 415-749-2228, www.act-sf.org
19 Apr 19
The Mercury News
Playwright Kate Hamill likes to approach classic literature with freewheeling theatricality, with a small cast of actors juggling many roles, often with men playing women and vice versa, in her fast-paced adaptations. Now American Conservatory Theater offers Hamill’s wry take on “Vanity Fair,” the sprawling 1848 novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that follows the fluctuating fortunes of ambitious Becky Sharp, born poor and making her way into high society by her wits, and her privileged and pleasant friend Amelia Sedley. Hamill made her playwriting debut in 2014 with Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility,” which Town Hall Theatre produced in Lafayette last year and which ACT’s MFA students will be performing during the “Vanity Fair” run. Playwright and actress Kate Hamill has been putting her imprint on several literary classics. (Photo courtesy of Kate Hamill) “I had been working as an actor and I was doing OK, but I was very frustrated by the kinds of roles I was auditioning for,” Hamill recalls. “I would see myself in 400 other women in a room auditioning to play someone’s wife or girlfriend or prostitutes, always in service of the male protagonist’s journey. “I wanted to create more opportunities for women, and I felt like if I want this to happen, I may have to do it. That sounds really inspirational and great, but actually I was quite resentful of it. Then I bet my friend $100 I could write a play. At the time I was really poor, so I knew my rent check would bounce if I didn’t write it.” Since then she’s also adapted Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” and “Mansfield Park” and Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” with versions of “The Odyssey” and “The Scarlet Letter” in development. Hamill first read “Vanity Fair” while doing research for another original play. “I found myself really struck by the female characters and the judgment of them within that book,” she says. “I thought, wouldn’t this be an interesting story to explore how we judge people while we ourselves often engaging in questionable conduct? Especially how we judge women, how we want to break them down into a sort of madonna-whore complex. I mentioned it to someone really early on, and he said, ‘Oh, it’s been tried to adapt ‘Vanity Fair.’ It’s impossible.’ And ever since I was a little kid, if you tell me something can’t be done, I’m like, well, I’ll show you!” She kept coming back to that question of judgment while working on this play. “People distance themselves from these stories,” she says. “They feel like the classics are museum pieces and they don’t have much to do with us. The reason why I adapt the classics at all is because I really want to reclaim these stories, which are cultural touchstones for us, which shape us as much as we have shaped them, from a radical feminist perspective. “But I also want to strip the away the comfortable audience remove that makes it so easy to judge characters up on stage. If our own lives were on stage, the petty deceptions and hypocrisies and weaknesses that we all have would just appall us. I’m really interested in how people judge other people and how that shapes society. And I think that’s the particularly true for women.” While she certainly wanted to capture Thackeray’s story, Hamill also felt not just free but obligated to take some liberties with it. “I do a radical kind of adaptation,” she says. “You have to bring your own point of view really strongly to it as a playwright, or else why do it? The theater that I find frustrates me the most is when I have an expectation and it exactly meets that expectation, and nothing about it is challenging or thought provoking. I guess I feel like it’s cynical to not challenge people even a little bit.” Contact Sam Hurwitt at shurwitt@gmail.com, and follow him at Twitter.com/shurwitt. ‘VANITY FAIR’ By Kate Hamill, based on the novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, presented by American Conservatory Theater When: In previews through April 23, main run is April 24-May 12 Where: ACT’s Geary Theater, 415 Geary St., San Francisco Tickets: $15-$110; 415-749-2228, www.act-sf.org
19 Apr 19
World Site News

(CNN)A man playing the role of Jesus Christ during Holy Week in the Philippines was crucified for the 33rd time on Good Friday.It’s part of a controversial Easter tradition in the country where people will undergo real-life crucifixions as an expression of their faith.Since the 1980s, Ruben Enaje, 58, has portrayed Jesus Christ’s crucifixion and…

19 Apr 19
La Pointe Center for the Arts

LPC says thank you to the generosity of the Duluth Superior Area Community Foundation Michael and Grutzner Funds for funding the LPC Affiliate Positivity Children’s Theatre again in 2019. Funding will be used for scholarships and artistic support. This is the 25th year that Founder and Artistic Director Julie Stryker has been guiding Positivity Children’s […]