Pocketbook

15 Dec 18
The Life of Rye 858

Raising the value of your home could be done quickly by doing home renovations. There are some easy suggestions on remodeling your the home of take full advantage of the value of your property. These concepts will assist you maintain them affordable as well as do the ones that are most valuable to make your […]

15 Dec 18
Viral NetPost

It’s safe to say that Hollywood has begun to embrace virtual reality (VR).TechRadar’s VR MonthTechRadar and PC Gamer are diving deep into virtual reality this month with a series of guides, how-tos, and features digging into every aspect of VR that we’re simply calling VR Month. It’s all being made possible by Oculus, which stepped…

15 Dec 18
Fashion

evening simple shoulders female affordable genuine water bottle chain handle eagle creek travelsmith canada smart unusual australia wholesale hiking football beautiful supply backpacking supplies samsonite delsey cooler real packs burgundy travelpro animal print lockable orange tourister teens teenage wallet size handmade cable sporty buckle inexpensive beaded food costume lulu colourful
lightest warehouse dust fun names rack waist ticket ratings keyrings butler amenity matching holders christmas handles target caddy couple hardware airplane carlton dance amity designers footjoy a9 pointe initials insert hardtop ballet stand manufacturers wall passports golf fine xoxo styles shower walmart lark shops cart coach engraved car making laundry travelon pocketbooks clearance clipa
attorney armor plastic less amazon brand army slouch womans tooled breifcase champion backpackers shoe sportsgirl hangers messanger school legal jack georges electronics outlet authentic swissgear flower heaven reporter that sell what is huge gymtote structured rucksacks imitation vs bridal name studded wallets tumblr wide logo document clive sleeve schlesinger notebook weekend

15 Dec 18
SCNG
As this winter’s gift-giving season proceeds, California voters might want to pause a moment and pat themselves on the back for a gift that has lasted 30 years: Proposition 103. If there ever was a ballot measure proving the effectiveness of direct democracy, making policy by letting the public vote on important policy choices, this is it. Voters who participated back in 1988 might also want to congratulate themselves on resisting the blandishments of a massive advertising campaign that sought to squash this initiative, whose backers were outspent by margins of more than 10-1. Fully $63 million was spent against Proposition 103 — that’s $134 million in today’s dollars, far more than the $110 million spent against this fall’s dialysis-meddling Proposition 8 — and it still won by a large margin. Most of the money came from the insurance industry, which until then had pretty much had its way with California regulators. Before that vote, governors appointed California’s insurance commissioner, with no firm rules governing what rate increases that official could allow for car and property insurance. Proposition 103 changed all this immediately. It made the insurance commissioner an elected state officer and imposed limits on premium increases. The Consumer Federation of America reported last month the measure has saved California motorists alone $154 billion over 30 years compared with what drivers in other states have paid — an average of about $5 billion yearly. The group found that auto liability insurance, the most basic part of an auto policy, now costs 5.7 percent less in California than it did 30 years ago, when the law took effect in early 1989. Prices for the same coverage meanwhile rose 58.5 percent around the rest of America. No one has calculated the accompanying savings on homeowner insurance and other property coverage, but it’s certain they have also been substantial. State Farm Insurance, for just one example, is now in court trying to avoid an order to reduce homeowners’ rates by $150 million a year. For those whom soon-to-be-ex-Gov. Jerry Brown likes to call “declinists,” that’s one thing keeping living expenses under control even while California sales and income taxes are somewhat higher than in most other states. “Can you name anything else that costs less now than it did 30 years ago?” asks Proposition 103 author Harvey Rosenfield, former president of the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights, now known as Consumer Watchdog, one of the state’s leading consumer advocate groups. “When I wrote it, I never imagined it would save motorists as much as it has,” he said. Among other things Prop. 103 established: Auto insurance prices are based mostly on a driver’s safety record and miles driven, insurance companies now must open their books and justify all rate increases and they can no longer base rates on where customers live, a practice commonly known as “redlining,” which saw residents of the poorest areas forced to pay some of the highest prices. Of course, enforcement of these rules has not always been certain. Over the years, the insurance industry has filed more than 100 lawsuits against Prop. 103, besides trying to get the state Legislature to nullify most of its rules. Two initiatives to water it down have also been defeated. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]This fight may never end. Five current court and administrative proceedings are now challenging parts of Prop. 103, even while State Farm Insurance fights its big refund order. “This is proof that citizen initiatives can change the way consumers are treated and make the system fairer,” says Carmen Balber, Consumer Watchdog executive director. In this time when it’s become possible for state legislators to interfere in the initiative process and reach “settlements” with sponsors of measures that have qualified for the ballot, skeptics often question whether it’s wise to let the public — not politicians — decide important policy issues. But Prop. 103 stands as a shining example of what the initiative process at its purest can accomplish if voters can see through the flood of special interest advertising so common at election times and make decisions of their own about key issues affecting their lives and pocketbooks. Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com.
15 Dec 18
Tin Soldiers

Mazon Labs is a cornerstone corporation facility within the Galactic Co-Prosperity Sphere (GCPS) focusing on pharmaceutical and military research. Like most of the corrupt corporate entities within the GCPS, Mazon Labs places profits ahead of morality. The endless pocketbooks of corporate military ventures is a siren song for those willing to look aside as inhumane […]

14 Dec 18
On The Minds

I have always been curious why more natural health “Cures” or fixes weren’t talked about or well known. The more I studied The more I started peeling back the layers of bureaucracy.  It was almost hard to believe how corrupt and blatantly in the pockets of big corporations these agencies are. I mean in 1992 […]

14 Dec 18
Sky Dancing

Wow! Has it been cold here Sky Dancers!   It’s finally crept back up into the more seasonal sixties .  At least I’m not out in the cold but I’m thinking it’s just a bit of time before the Republican Party, its leaders, and the Golden Bull its been worshiping get thrown out on the ice […]

14 Dec 18
Yours truly esha

Hello blog-fam, welcome back and how are you all doing today? Before I get started, I would like to know your best organizational tip. Do you consider yourself as organized? Here are some things I do to stay organized. GET A PLANNER: I have a small one, that can go anywhere with me. It fits […]

14 Dec 18
Barker's View

Hey, kids! Your rambling scribe has returned to Barker’s View HQ following a brief sojourn! It’s good to be back. I’m here to report that despite the many political, social and economic woes that plague the Sunshine State like a golem – if you are lucky enough to live in Florida, then you are lucky […]

14 Dec 18
Zhy's Blog

The recent flooding in the city of Dagupan resulted to the 14 days hiatus from class. These days of hiatus are a storm, unexpected, it just started from merely suspension of classes due to heavy rain until it resulted to immense flooding in most areas of the city. Last July 18, 2018, the suspension of […]

14 Dec 18
Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders

Picture source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/60584010@N00/3132855025 A guest post from Buck Greenback, CFO Carmen: How time flies. The year is almost up. Last time we met you asked me to share some ideas about how to think more commercially. So, you know me: I like numbers. Here’s a practical idea that can help you secure an unexpected end-of-year […]

14 Dec 18
The Mercury News
French riots a cautionary tale on carbon taxes Re: “A global struggle with carbon taxes” (Page NW9, Dec. 10): Writers Steven Mufson and James McAuley highlight the political disasters that governments like France have faced when carbon taxes, while effective at reducing carbon pollution, do not protect citizens from economic hardship. On Nov. 27, Republican and Democratic members of Congress introduced the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (H.R. 7173). This bipartisan bill imposes a fee on carbon emissions and returns all revenues to American households. This legislation will reduce pollution by 40 percent within 12 years and create millions of jobs. Many American households will receive more in dividends than they pay in carbon fees. Taxing carbon and returning the revenues to American families will protect their pocketbooks and build their support for a clean energy economy. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Members of both parties agree it’s an idea whose time has come. Mary Selkirk Kensington
14 Dec 18
East Bay Times
French riots a cautionarytale on carbon taxes Re: “A global struggle with carbon taxes” (Page NW9, Dec. 10): Writers Steven Mufson and James McAuley highlight the political disasters that governments like France have faced when carbon taxes, while effective at reducing carbon pollution, do not protect citizens from economic hardship. On Nov. 27, Republican and Democratic members of Congress introduced the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (H.R. 7173). This bipartisan bill imposes a fee on carbon emissions and returns all revenues to American households. This legislation will reduce pollution by 40 percent within 12 years and create millions of jobs. Many American households will receive more in dividends than they pay in carbon fees. Taxing carbon and returning the revenues to American families will protect their pocketbooks and build their support for a clean energy economy. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Members of both parties agree it’s an idea whose time has come. Mary SelkirkKensington
14 Dec 18
Tranquil Mountain

The price of daily merch; Will make you go berserk; The sign on a gallon of milk, Faux woven silk, Seven bills, Gives your pocketbook the chills! Forty Benjamin’s for a new ride, Seventy-five bills to professionally confide, Increasing throughout the generations; It’s called inflation; Make sure your paychecks are on docket, Otherwise it will […]

13 Dec 18
Variety

After less than two months on the market and some serious interest from at least a couple of deep-pocketed potential buyers, comedian and actress Kristen Wiig has sold her painstakingly updated and restored mid-century modern micro-compound above Los Angeles’s Silver Lake Reservoir for $5.225 million. Lucky for the former “Saturday Night Live” star, set to […]

13 Dec 18
The Mercury News
Click here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device. OAKLAND — Despite a robust economy, Bay Area food banks are getting anxious because the donations they usually count on this time of year to serve millions of meals to needy residents so far have been nothing short of anemic. At least part of the reason for the donations drought may be that area residents depleted their pocketbooks by giving generously to the survivors and families of victims in the recent Butte County wildfires, California’s deadliest and most destructive ever, food bank officials say. For the first time in four years, donations to the Alameda County Community Food Bank fell short in November, so much so that it needs to raise $3 million by the end of this month to meet its fundraising goals, said Michael Altfest, the organization’s director of community engagement. Donations also are down at the Second Harvest Food Bank, which serves 250,000 people a month in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. Second Harvest is a little more than $1 million short of its goal, CEO Leslie Bacho said. Also in trouble is the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano, which is running about $500,000 behind last year’s pace at this time, communications director Lisa Sherrill said. Besides the fires, some food bank officials speculate that the polarizing mid-term elections also drained people’s extra change this year as Republicans and Democrats waged a fierce battle for control of the House. Of course, the food bank representatives aren’t second-guessing people’s decision to send their money to the Camp Fire relief efforts. Second Harvest even delivered a truckload of food to Chico for distribution to residents of Paradise, Magalia and Pulga displaced or otherwise affected by the fire. “Anytime we have a local disaster, it’s hard to predict how it will affect funding,”  Bacho said. But because November is when food banks typically get the bulk of their money from holiday-spirited donors, officials fear there won’t be enough to spread around over the next year. The three organizations collectively distribute the equivalent of 100 million meals a year in the five Bay Area counties. The Alameda County food bank, which annually serves about 300,000 people countywide, relies on November and December donations to make up two-thirds of its annual budget for the following year. Although there’s a shortage of money at the food banks, there isn’t a shortage of people in need. With housing and other costs always rising in the Bay Area, the organizations said they’ve seen an increase in clients. The number of clients served by Second Harvest rose by 2 percent the past year, for example. “Unfortunately, a continuous steady increase in the cost of living has increased housing costs so much that some of our clients struggle to pay their rent,” Bacho said. Bacho said she spoke with an elderly couple last month who live on a fixed income and had to dig into their emergency fund after the rent increased. That money too is now gone so they’ll need to cut their food budget. When talking to clients, Altfest said the first words out of their mouths are that rent is so expensive. “So often in the Bay Area in general, some can keep a roof over their heads, pay for gas in their car … but at the end of the day, just can’t afford a healthy meal,” he said. Unless donations start pouring in, the nonprofit organizations say they’ll have to seriously analyze their programs with an eye toward making cuts next year. Alameda County food bank distributes the equivalent of 31 million meals to some 200 organizations throughout the county, including food pantries, soup kitchens and other food programs such as Meals on Wheels and the Salvation Army. Its mobile pantry helps distribute food through different schools. In fact, the organization mostly serves children and seniors, Altfest said. Second Harvest distributes about 55 million meals a year and half its clients also are children, as well as seniors, Bacho said. The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano annually distributes 18 million meals and reaches 178,000 customers a month. Although all donations are accepted, monetary donations are the most useful. The Alameda County food bank says every dollar donated helps provide about $7 worth of food, and 95 percent of the money goes directly to its programs. Every dollar donated to Second Harvest provides two healthy meals, thanks to its relationships with donors and packers, Bacho said. To donate to the Alameda County Community Food Bank, go to www.accfb.org. To donate to Second Harvest Food Bank serving San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, go to www.shfb.org. The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano can be reached at www.foodbankccs.org.
13 Dec 18
East Bay Times
Click here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device. OAKLAND — Despite a robust economy, Bay Area food banks are getting anxious because the donations they usually count on this time of year to serve millions of meals to needy residents so far have been nothing short of anemic. At least part of the reason for the donations drought may be that area residents depleted their pocketbooks by giving generously to the survivors and families of victims in the recent Butte County wildfires, California’s deadliest and most destructive ever, food bank officials say. For the first time in four years, donations to the Alameda County Community Food Bank fell short in November, so much so that it needs to raise $3 million by the end of this month to meet its fundraising goals, said Michael Altfest, the organization’s director of community engagement. Donations also are down at the Second Harvest Food Bank, which serves 250,000 people a month in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. Second Harvest is a little more than $1 million short of its goal, CEO Leslie Bacho said. Also in trouble is the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano, which is running about $500,000 behind last year’s pace at this time, communications director Lisa Sherrill said. Besides the fires, some food bank officials speculate that the polarizing mid-term elections also drained people’s extra change this year as Republicans and Democrats waged a fierce battle for control of the House. Of course, the food bank representatives aren’t second-guessing people’s decision to send their money to the Camp Fire relief efforts. Second Harvest even delivered a truckload of food to Chico for distribution to residents of Paradise, Magalia and Pulga displaced or otherwise affected by the fire. “Anytime we have a local disaster, it’s hard to predict how it will affect funding,”  Bacho said. But because November is when food banks typically get the bulk of their money from holiday-spirited donors, officials fear there won’t be enough to spread around over the next year. The three organizations collectively distribute the equivalent of 100 million meals a year in the five Bay Area counties. The Alameda County food bank, which annually serves about 300,000 people countywide, relies on November and December donations to make up two-thirds of its annual budget for the following year. Although there’s a shortage of money at the food banks, there isn’t a shortage of people in need. With housing and other costs always rising in the Bay Area, the organizations said they’ve seen an increase in clients. The number of clients served by Second Harvest rose by 2 percent the past year, for example. “Unfortunately, a continuous steady increase in the cost of living has increased housing costs so much that some of our clients struggle to pay their rent,” Bacho said. Bacho said she spoke with an elderly couple last month who live on a fixed income and had to dig into their emergency fund after the rent increased. That money too is now gone so they’ll need to cut their food budget. When talking to clients, Altfest said the first words out of their mouths are that rent is so expensive. “So often in the Bay Area in general, some can keep a roof over their heads, pay for gas in their car … but at the end of the day, just can’t afford a healthy meal,” he said. Unless donations start pouring in, the nonprofit organizations say they’ll have to seriously analyze their programs with an eye toward making cuts next year. Alameda County food bank distributes the equivalent of 31 million meals to some 200 organizations throughout the county, including food pantries, soup kitchens and other food programs such as Meals on Wheels and the Salvation Army. Its mobile pantry helps distribute food through different schools. In fact, the organization mostly serves children and seniors, Altfest said. Second Harvest distributes about 55 million meals a year and half its clients also are children, as well as seniors, Bacho said. The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano annually distributes 18 million meals and reaches 178,000 customers a month. Although all donations are accepted, monetary donations are the most useful. The Alameda County food bank says every dollar donated helps provide about $7 worth of food, and 95 percent of the money goes directly to its programs. Every dollar donated to Second Harvest provides two healthy meals, thanks to its relationships with donors and packers, Bacho said. To donate to the Alameda County Community Food Bank, go to www.accfb.org. To donate to Second Harvest Food Bank serving San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, go to www.shfb.org. The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano can be reached at www.foodbankccs.org.