President

23 Mar 19
Ashbroyale

Trump Ramps Up Campaign as Mueller Report Looms: A Closer Look SUBSCRIBE: https://youtu.be/nE2uhv-ZCSw : Seth takes a closer look at President Trump ramping up his re-election campaign as the specter of Robert Mueller’s report looms over him. » Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth » Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-seth-meyers/ » Watch Late Night with […]

23 Mar 19
debexpert

The long-awaited document involving President Donald Trump is finished, and that’s enough for social media to start cracking jokes. via CNET Blogs https://ift.tt/2Tr5rrA

23 Mar 19
SECRET WARS REPORT

The U.S. posted its biggest monthly budget deficit on record last month, amid a 20 percent drop in corporate tax revenue and a boost in spending so far this fiscal year. The budget gap widened to $234 billion in February, compared with a fiscal gap of $215.2 billion a year earlier. That gap surpassed the […]

23 Mar 19
viral news reports

President Donald Trump’s selection of Stephen Moore, who is also a regular contributor to CNN, indicates that Trump is looking for a more sympathetic voice on the Fed. | Alex Wong/Getty Images Stephen Moore, President Donald Trump’s nominee for a seat on the Federal Reserve board, has called for Chairman Jerome Powell and the Fed’s […]

23 Mar 19
FOX 4 Kansas City WDAF-TV | News, Weather, Sports

Florida has earned a reputation for being home to some colorful characters — most notably the “Florida man.” He isn’t actually a single person but rather a trope of all the Florida men who’ve made headlines for doing something … unusual. And he’s now starring in the latest internet fad: the “Florida man” challenge, in […]

23 Mar 19
Ashbroyale

Brexit Boy Band & Mississippi Water Crisis: VICE News Tonight Full Episode (HBO) SUBSCRIBE: https://youtu.be/nE2uhv-ZCSw : This is the March 13, 2019, FULL FREE EPISODE of VICE News Tonight on HBO. 2:00 VICE News flies down to Miramar, FL to cover a local mayor who has decided to run for president begging the question, can […]

23 Mar 19
techbloggers

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said it is “possible” that President Donald Trump was sent by God to save Israel from Iran. from NDTV News – Top-stories https://ift.tt/2FpLqMR

23 Mar 19
News Trends & Tech

The long-awaited document involving President Donald Trump is finished, and that’s enough for social media to start cracking jokes. from CNET https://ift.tt/2FpN6G9

23 Mar 19
Saikumar

President Donald Trump on Friday abruptly announced the cancellation of sanctions imposed by his own Treasury Department to tighten international pressure on North Korea. from NDTV News – Special https://ift.tt/2FuIvnB

23 Mar 19
National Post

WASHINGTON — Congressional Democrats are calling for special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Russia investigation to be fully released, including the underlying evidence. They are threatening subpoenas if it is not. The demands are setting up a potential tug of war between congressional Democrats and President Donald Trump’s administration that federal judges might eventually […]

23 Mar 19
Saikumar

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said it is “possible” that President Donald Trump was sent by God to save Israel from Iran. from NDTV News – Special https://ift.tt/2FpLqMR

23 Mar 19
Archy Worldys

The issue of global warming on the agenda of the EU Heads of State and Government meeting was only mentioned. No agreement was found. By Jean-Pierre Stroobants Posted yesterday at 19h11, updated yesterday at 19h33 Time to Reading 2 min. States must unveil their "national contribution" to the global goal of limiting warming to 2 […]

23 Mar 19
The Pakistani News Corner

With numerous charges for the web of unsavory characters associated with Trump, the probe has exposed enough to undercut the administration’s standing with a large portion of the public that will be thinking of the character of this President at election time, writes Julian Zelizer. from CNN.com – RSS Channel https://ift.tt/2Wh5fNe

23 Mar 19
Joni's Political Blog

By Amy Russo  03/22/2019 Jacinda Ardern “has shown the way” for other world leaders by banning military-style weapons after the mass shooting in Christchurch, the Times says. The New York Times editorial board praised New Zealand’s crackdown on military-style weapons after last week’s mass shooting as the U.S. neglects to take such action after dozens of […]

23 Mar 19
Orange County Register
Poseidon officials, who’ve spent 21 years working toward approval of a controversial desalination plant in Huntington Beach, had a figurative bounce in their step as they emerged from yet another permitting agency meeting Friday. The Regional Water Quality Control Board remains months away from voting on one of the final two permits needed by Poseidon. But the fact the board staff detailed a specific timeline for the board’s permit process — with a final vote penciled in for Oct. 25 — was seen by Poseidon Vice President Scott Maloni interpreted that as a signal that board geologists, engineers and administrators are confident they can work through outstanding issues. “There’s a light at the end of the tunnel,” Maloni said. At one point, the water board expected to vote last year, but ongoing issues continued to delay the approval process for a project touted as a drought-proof answer to the area’s water needs. Details still to be worked out include how the $1 billion plant will extract water from the ocean and how to mitigate the environmental damage it causes. While the water board permit would be a big step forward, more approvals would be needed. Additionally, there continues to be opposition from both environmentalists and those concerned with the potential cost of Poseidon water. If Poseidon wins the Regional Water Quality Control Board permit, it would then need a California Coastal Commission permit and a final contract with the Orange County Water District. The district would buy most — if not all — of Poseidon’s water and distribute it to its member agencies. John Kennedy, the water district’s executive director of engineering and water resource, said that contract would likely include a contingency requiring the project win a multi-million dollar annual subsidy from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and purchase agreements from the water district’s member water agencies. Outstanding issues Poseidon’s item on Friday’s water board agenda focused primarily on the continuing issue of how water would be extracted from the ocean. A 2015 amendment to the state’s Ocean Plan says that desalination plants must use, if feasible, a subsurface intake system — that is, underground pipes extending beneath the ocean floor that suck seawater through the sand. That technology avoids the mortal threat to larvae, plankton and other small sea life when above-ground pipes take the water directly from the ocean. The Regional Water Quality Control Board had previously agreed with Poseidon that the state’s preferred subsurface approach was not technically feasible for all of the 107 million gallons of sea water the company is proposing taking into its plant each day. Given the geology of the area, the more costly subsurface intake could contaminate neighboring freshwater aquifers with saltwater and could draw down water from Huntington Beach’s two wetlands, state geologist Scott Seyfried reiterated to the board Friday. But Poseidon and the Regional Water Quality Control Board, assisted by Seyfried, have been examining a hybrid system that would use a combination of subsurface and direct intake. The preliminary conclusion is that just 3.5 percent of the 107 million gallons of seawater used daily could be extracted by a subsurface system without jeopardizing aquifers and wetlands, Seyfried said. But he added that the water boards’ engineers and geologists were still evaluating the possibility. And two environmentalist activists urged the board to more thoroughly scrutinize the viability of the subsurface intake at the site. “We don’t think there’s adequate information to make a decision at this time,” said OC Coastkeeper attorney Colin Kelly. He noted that while his group opposes the Poseidon project, it supports a proposal for a much smaller desalination plant — which would rely entirely on subsurface intake — just inland from from Doheny State Beach in Dana Point. Details also are still being worked out for how Poseidon would mitigate the environmental damage its plant would cause. The company has proposed paying for regular dredging of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands inlet, which has run out of funds previously set aside for that work. Additionally, water board analysts are still examining possible locations for direct intake pipes and the environmental impacts of the outflow of the brine to be discharged from the plant. Is it needed? While OC Coastkeeper was unsuccessful in its recent lawsuit to force an entirely new environmental impact report for the project, that group and other Poseidon critics have been buoyed in their opposition by a study last fall that ranked the Poseidon plant at the bottom of five water projects being pursued throughout the county. Faring much better in the analysis was the smaller Doheny desalination proposal. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Poseidon prevails in desalination lawsuit Orange County water study updated, Poseidon desalination plant still scores low Poseidon desalination plant: What to know about its pros and cons for Southern California water Orange County officials give early approval to Huntington Beach desalination plant contract Tale of three desalination plants: Why the Doheny proposal is winning over some skeptics [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Besides using subsurface intake, the Doheny plant would serve a south Orange County area far more dependent on imported water than the north- and central-county region that would be the primary beneficiary of Poseidon water. If water from northern California and the Colorado River continues its current flow to Southern California, Poseidon water could end up costing customers nearly $400 million more than the imported water over the plant’s lifetime,  according to the study by the Municipal Water District of Orange County. The Poseidon plant could produce as much as 56,000-acre feet a year — enough for about 450,000 of the 2.5 million residents served by the Orange County Water District. But the analysis said that’s far more than north and central Orange County would need. In the best case scenario without the Poseidon plant, there would be no shortages there — and in the worst case, shortages of 22,000-acre feet annually. The report sites a series of smaller planned projects that could meet that projected maximum shortfall.
23 Mar 19
Daily Breeze
Poseidon officials, who’ve spent 21 years working toward approval of a controversial desalination plant in Huntington Beach, had a figurative bounce in their step as they emerged from yet another permitting agency meeting Friday. The Regional Water Quality Control Board remains months away from voting on one of the final two permits needed by Poseidon. But the fact the board staff detailed a specific timeline for the board’s permit process — with a final vote penciled in for Oct. 25 — was seen by Poseidon Vice President Scott Maloni interpreted that as a signal that board geologists, engineers and administrators are confident they can work through outstanding issues. “There’s a light at the end of the tunnel,” Maloni said. At one point, the water board expected to vote last year, but ongoing issues continued to delay the approval process for a project touted as a drought-proof answer to the area’s water needs. Details still to be worked out include how the $1 billion plant will extract water from the ocean and how to mitigate the environmental damage it causes. While the water board permit would be a big step forward, more approvals would be needed. Additionally, there continues to be opposition from both environmentalists and those concerned with the potential cost of Poseidon water. If Poseidon wins the Regional Water Quality Control Board permit, it would then need a California Coastal Commission permit and a final contract with the Orange County Water District. The district would buy most — if not all — of Poseidon’s water and distribute it to its member agencies. John Kennedy, the water district’s executive director of engineering and water resource, said that contract would likely include a contingency requiring the project win a multi-million dollar annual subsidy from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and purchase agreements from the water district’s member water agencies. Outstanding issues Poseidon’s item on Friday’s water board agenda focused primarily on the continuing issue of how water would be extracted from the ocean. A 2015 amendment to the state’s Ocean Plan says that desalination plants must use, if feasible, a subsurface intake system — that is, underground pipes extending beneath the ocean floor that suck seawater through the sand. That technology avoids the mortal threat to larvae, plankton and other small sea life when above-ground pipes take the water directly from the ocean. The Regional Water Quality Control Board had previously agreed with Poseidon that the state’s preferred subsurface approach was not technically feasible for all of the 107 million gallons of sea water the company is proposing taking into its plant each day. Given the geology of the area, the more costly subsurface intake could contaminate neighboring freshwater aquifers with saltwater and could draw down water from Huntington Beach’s two wetlands, state geologist Scott Seyfried reiterated to the board Friday. But Poseidon and the Regional Water Quality Control Board, assisted by Seyfried, have been examining a hybrid system that would use a combination of subsurface and direct intake. The preliminary conclusion is that just 3.5 percent of the 107 million gallons of seawater used daily could be extracted by a subsurface system without jeopardizing aquifers and wetlands, Seyfried said. But he added that the water boards’ engineers and geologists were still evaluating the possibility. And two environmentalist activists urged the board to more thoroughly scrutinize the viability of the subsurface intake at the site. “We don’t think there’s adequate information to make a decision at this time,” said OC Coastkeeper attorney Colin Kelly. He noted that while his group opposes the Poseidon project, it supports a proposal for a much smaller desalination plant — which would rely entirely on subsurface intake — just inland from from Doheny State Beach in Dana Point. Details also are still being worked out for how Poseidon would mitigate the environmental damage its plant would cause. The company has proposed paying for regular dredging of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands inlet, which has run out of funds previously set aside for that work. Additionally, water board analysts are still examining possible locations for direct intake pipes and the environmental impacts of the outflow of the brine to be discharged from the plant. Is it needed? While OC Coastkeeper was unsuccessful in its recent lawsuit to force an entirely new environmental impact report for the project, that group and other Poseidon critics have been buoyed in their opposition by a study last fall that ranked the Poseidon plant at the bottom of five water projects being pursued throughout the county. Faring much better in the analysis was the smaller Doheny desalination proposal. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Poseidon prevails in desalination lawsuit Orange County water study updated, Poseidon desalination plant still scores low Poseidon desalination plant: What to know about its pros and cons for Southern California water Orange County officials give early approval to Huntington Beach desalination plant contract Tale of three desalination plants: Why the Doheny proposal is winning over some skeptics [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Besides using subsurface intake, the Doheny plant would serve a south Orange County area far more dependent on imported water than the north- and central-county region that would be the primary beneficiary of Poseidon water. If water from northern California and the Colorado River continues its current flow to Southern California, Poseidon water could end up costing customers nearly $400 million more than the imported water over the plant’s lifetime,  according to the study by the Municipal Water District of Orange County. The Poseidon plant could produce as much as 56,000-acre feet a year — enough for about 450,000 of the 2.5 million residents served by the Orange County Water District. But the analysis said that’s far more than north and central Orange County would need. In the best case scenario without the Poseidon plant, there would be no shortages there — and in the worst case, shortages of 22,000-acre feet annually. The report sites a series of smaller planned projects that could meet that projected maximum shortfall.
23 Mar 19
CBS Chicago

Andrew Yang, one of more than a dozen Democrats who’ve announced a run for president, will hold a rally next week in Chicago.