Psychedelic

23 Jul 19
Bandcamp Daily

A guide to the indie rap producer’s globe-trotting releases.

23 Jul 19
The Toilet Ov Hell

Few things fare better in the horrifically oppressive temperature this summer than the ruthless hunger and otherworldly violence of death metal, reveling in accelerated decay and maddening inferno. Here are six of the most promising acts from this year you should be paying attention to if they’re not already mulching your flesh and bones.

23 Jul 19
Dad Lover Family

This is the Best Funny Store you’ve never seen before. Believe it or just watch for 5 minutes. I am damn Sure you will become crazy and buy anything from our site. We have 500k satisfied buyer in worldwide. So, Kill People in Silently.

23 Jul 19
Alien Octopus

Maniacal laughter echoed from the shaping bay as Dane Reynolds tore into a blank with a planer. “You think I’m concerned about dimensions?” Reynolds said when probed about the specs of his very unconventional creations, which he was making in preparation for the Vans Duct Tape Festival at the US Open of Surfing in Huntington […]

23 Jul 19
Psychedelic Support

Ryan was a meditator, experienced with ayahuasca, so it surprised him (not in a good way) when a disturbing ceremony revealed the world as hollow and grotesquely meaningless. In the aftermath, he felt dissociated and numb. It took him the better part of a year to recover, and he was still wondering what had happened […]

23 Jul 19
Rock Is The New Roll

Known mostly for her work with the Surf-Noir Band La Luz, Shana Cleveland doesn’t stray too far from the vintage guitar, psychedelic haze ambience on Night of the Worm Moon, her second proper full length record as a solo artist. The cool, laconic, mostly psychedelic under current that wafts through the entire proceedings like an […]

23 Jul 19
Redlands Daily Facts
A Harvard student who wrote her senior thesis on campus opposition to the Vietnam war provided the genesis of a new movie by longtime Redlands filmmaker Peter Coonradt. “The film is told through the eyes of a young woman who graduated in 2017,” Coonradt said. “She discovered that opposition to the war was just part of the larger counterculture and all the stuff that was happening then. “She digs up more than she bargained for in the unconventional lives of artists, musicians and activists from the Harvard class of 1968,” said Coonradt. The result is the film “Underground 68,” which will screen at 3 p.m. Sunday, July 28, at Emerson Los Angeles, 5960 Sunset Blvd., in Hollywood. The movie is being screened across the country and has previously been shown in small venues in the Bay Area, New York City and Cambridge, Massachusetts. When Coonradt read Ariel Smolik-Valles’ thesis, he said, it evoked a lot of memories from that time. “Right about then I got the announcement of our 50th reunion to take place a year later, in late May 2018,” he said. “With the thesis fresh in my mind, I suggested the idea for a movie.” Over the next year, he put together a team of counterculture classmates to produce the reunion event, he said. Because he’d had no contact with his classmates in 50 years, Coonradt originally had no intention of attending the reunion, but he changed his mind. Seeing the film possibilities, he also contacted co-producer and Harvard classics professor Richard Thomas, author of the book “Why Bob Dylan Matters.” In interviewing class members at the reunion, Smolik-Valles discovered the time period was an amalgam of music, art, experimental films, underground comics, psychedelic drugs, Eastern philosophy and cosmic consciousness. The film ended up being not so much about the reunion as about the counterculture, Coonradt said. “The late 1960s counterculture was a mass awakening,” he said. “It was the dawn of the movements for peace, civil rights, environmentalism, sexual diversity and women’s liberation.” One theme Smolik-Valles touches on is the treatment of women in the anti-war movement, especially in Students for a Democratic Society, Coonradt said. The women she interviewed reported that they were treated as the girlfriends of activists, Coonradt said, and not given significant roles in the movement. [cq comment=””This connects big time with the movie, because women were horribly discriminated against at Harvard generally and that story gets a lot of attention in the film,” he said.”] Coonradt’s love for filmmaking began in the underground Harvard film societies run by students. The Los Angeles native attended film school at UCLA for a short time after graduating from Harvard. He left for a job in the industry. He worked in various capacities in Hollywood before moving to the Inland area, where he has produced educational and promotional films for the County of Riverside for 25 years. Coonradt, a professional filmmaker for 40 years, who’s mostly self-taught, will lead a post-screening discussion at the Hollywood venue. His previous film, “This Is Who We Are,” is about undocumented people and immigration activists in the Inland Empire. See more of his work at https://www.petercoonradt.com/. “It would be hard to find a common thread to the films I have made,” Coonradt said. When he meets someone who interests him, or discovers a fascinating topic, he finds a topic for a film. “Underground 68″ shines a blazing light on today’s realities and shows how a certain kind of people were transformed by the values of the time,” he said. “My approach to filmmaking has always been to shoot first and ask questions later,” he said. “The story in the film came together gradually in the process of shooting and editing.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] He feels that the device of having the young woman as the storyteller works well. “I take the raw material of the past, put the puzzle pieces together and create an act of personal expression,” he said. There is a natural audience of people who lived through the ’60s, Coonradt said. “I am more excited about young people seeing it and finding inspiration,” he said. “It is not political but is bigger than that.” For more information about the film visit https://www.underground-68.com/. For tickets to the screening, sponsored by Harvardwood and the Harvard Club of Southern California: http://hcsc.clubs.harvard.edu/article.html?aid=1164. The film can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/339244211.
23 Jul 19
Press Enterprise
A Harvard student who wrote her senior thesis on campus opposition to the Vietnam war provided the genesis of a new movie by longtime Redlands filmmaker Peter Coonradt. “The film is told through the eyes of a young woman who graduated in 2017,” Coonradt said. “She discovered that opposition to the war was just part of the larger counterculture and all the stuff that was happening then. “She digs up more than she bargained for in the unconventional lives of artists, musicians and activists from the Harvard class of 1968,” said Coonradt. The result is the film “Underground 68,” which will screen at 3 p.m. Sunday, July 28, at Emerson Los Angeles, 5960 Sunset Blvd., in Hollywood. The movie is being screened across the country and has previously been shown in small venues in the Bay Area, New York City and Cambridge, Massachusetts. When Coonradt read Ariel Smolik-Valles’ thesis, he said, it evoked a lot of memories from that time. “Right about then I got the announcement of our 50th reunion to take place a year later, in late May 2018,” he said. “With the thesis fresh in my mind, I suggested the idea for a movie.” Over the next year, he put together a team of counterculture classmates to produce the reunion event, he said. Because he’d had no contact with his classmates in 50 years, Coonradt originally had no intention of attending the reunion, but he changed his mind. Seeing the film possibilities, he also contacted co-producer and Harvard classics professor Richard Thomas, author of the book “Why Bob Dylan Matters.” In interviewing class members at the reunion, Smolik-Valles discovered the time period was an amalgam of music, art, experimental films, underground comics, psychedelic drugs, Eastern philosophy and cosmic consciousness. The film ended up being not so much about the reunion as about the counterculture, Coonradt said. “The late 1960s counterculture was a mass awakening,” he said. “It was the dawn of the movements for peace, civil rights, environmentalism, sexual diversity and women’s liberation.” One theme Smolik-Valles touches on is the treatment of women in the anti-war movement, especially in Students for a Democratic Society, Coonradt said. The women she interviewed reported that they were treated as the girlfriends of activists, Coonradt said, and not given significant roles in the movement. [cq comment=””This connects big time with the movie, because women were horribly discriminated against at Harvard generally and that story gets a lot of attention in the film,” he said.”] Coonradt’s love for filmmaking began in the underground Harvard film societies run by students. The Los Angeles native attended film school at UCLA for a short time after graduating from Harvard. He left for a job in the industry. He worked in various capacities in Hollywood before moving to the Inland area, where he has produced educational and promotional films for the County of Riverside for 25 years. Coonradt, a professional filmmaker for 40 years, who’s mostly self-taught, will lead a post-screening discussion at the Hollywood venue. His previous film, “This Is Who We Are,” is about undocumented people and immigration activists in the Inland Empire. See more of his work at https://www.petercoonradt.com/. “It would be hard to find a common thread to the films I have made,” Coonradt said. When he meets someone who interests him, or discovers a fascinating topic, he finds a topic for a film. “Underground 68″ shines a blazing light on today’s realities and shows how a certain kind of people were transformed by the values of the time,” he said. “My approach to filmmaking has always been to shoot first and ask questions later,” he said. “The story in the film came together gradually in the process of shooting and editing.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] He feels that the device of having the young woman as the storyteller works well. “I take the raw material of the past, put the puzzle pieces together and create an act of personal expression,” he said. There is a natural audience of people who lived through the ’60s, Coonradt said. “I am more excited about young people seeing it and finding inspiration,” he said. “It is not political but is bigger than that.” For more information about the film visit https://www.underground-68.com/. For tickets to the screening, sponsored by Harvardwood and the Harvard Club of Southern California: http://hcsc.clubs.harvard.edu/article.html?aid=1164. The film can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/339244211.
23 Jul 19
Literary Yard

By: Lee Conrad The wood frame house, a century old, but in good shape, dominated the hilltop. Near it, a barn, in disuse for many years, struggled to keep from collapsing. A large white peace sign on the back side had faded, but Belinda knew it was there. She helped paint it. The field across […]

23 Jul 19
Love Love Peace Peace

RAI Congrescentrum, Amsterdam, 21st March 1970 I’m not being melodramatic in saying that this was going to be a critical year for the contest, one where it would be determined whether the contest had a future, or was going to be a funny little footnote in European history. The Scandinavian countries plus Austria had a […]