Psychology

18 Feb 19
The Leading Edge

Students filled room 103 of the Bragg Building on Tuesday night, Feb. 12,  to hear Gloria Baker Feinstein’s lecture about her photographic work.

18 Feb 19
The Indian Perspective

Why Rock Bottom in Serious Mental Illness Is Death  Psychology Today The idea that someone needs to hit rock bottom before they will get help for a serious mental illness is a dangerous myth. from “”mental health” OR “mental disorder” OR “psychiatry” OR “mental illness” OR “psychiatrist” OR “psychotherapist” OR “depression” OR “bipolar” -“the depression”” – […]

18 Feb 19
Fort Smith/Fayetteville News | 5newsonline KFSM 5NEWS

FORT SMITH (KFSM) — A list of potential candidates who have applied to be the next UAFS Chancellor has been released. The position is still open to others. The following list is of candidates who have applied thus far: Tyler Adams – Executive Dean of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning (CELEARN), Communication’s Professor -University of […]

18 Feb 19
K.B. Herret Photography

Less than three months after a protest organized by Students Against Social Injustice (SASI) against the Confederate statue took place at the University of Mississippi, a Confederate rally hosted by the Confederate 901 and the Hiwaymen will be taking place on Saturday, Feb. 23. Several Black student organizations on campus have come together to host […]

18 Feb 19
connywithay

Title: Don’t Close Your Eyes Author: Bob Hostetler Illustrator: Mark Chambers Publisher: Tommy Nelson ISBN: 978-1-4002-0951-4 “But if you really think you must, Then close your eyes real tight. And dream a dream of me because I dream of you each night,” ends Bob Hostetler’s children’s book, Don’t Close Your Eyes: A Silly Bedtime Story. ~ […]

18 Feb 19
Thrive Global
In our quest to live happier lives, lessen stress, and keep our relationships strong, new research shows that many of us are missing a vital piece of the puzzle. According to a team of scientists from the University of Mannheim in Germany, that piece is the “beautiful mess effect.” “Joy itself doesn’t mean a constant state of elation,” Chidera Eggerue, an author, exclaimed onstage at a TEDx Talk in Berlin in July. “Joy means a level of acceptance.” Eggerue argues we can all benefit from adopting a “beautiful mess” attitude, which does not refer to living a disorganized, messy life — but rather to embracing our imperfections, and being okay with showing our vulnerability. Eggerue’s argument isn’t simply an observation about human attitudes — it’s science-backed. In their study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the University of Mannheim researchers explored the real-life implications of the “beautiful mess effect” —  the idea that exposing our vulnerable sides and owning our failures can help us connect with others and see situations more positively. In a series of seven studies, the psychology researchers found that shifting our focus onto our negative aspects can actually reap positive effects, and they found it to ring true in a variety of situations. “Confessing romantic feelings, asking for help, or taking responsibility for a mistake constitute just a few examples of situations that require showing one’s vulnerability,” the study authors explain. The same is true for others opening up to you. “When depicting others in a vulnerable situation, individuals are [typically] expected to represent it more abstractly, focus more on the positive aspects of showing vulnerability, and, therefore, evaluate it more positively,” the researchers note. But that actually isn’t helpful. While it’s natural to struggle with opening up, Eggerue says that ignoring your imperfections, or pretending they don’t exist, will only lead to a self-defeating cycle, as you’ll find yourself trying to please others without accepting yourself first. “If you try to wrap yourself around other people’s ideas of perfect, you’ll be trapped in a void,” she says. “It’s like a game, but the game is rigged.” In order to practice the “beautiful mess effect” in your own life, both the study authors and Eggerue agree: Owning our messes is a skill, and it is one that can be learned over time. For starters, Eggerue suggests honing in on your self-talk, and beginning to develop an inner dialogue that accepts your flaws. “I know I’m a mess [sometimes], but I want to be the best possible mess I can be,” she suggests telling yourself. Most importantly, remember that accepting our shortcomings is about more than being direct and candid with others. It’s about being open with ourselves — owning what makes us who we are and making peace with each aspect, messes and all. “[It’s about] how you feel about yourself when no one is looking,” Eggerue points out. “Even when it hurts, be yourself.” Follow us here and subscribe here for all the latest news on how you can keep Thriving. Stay up to date or catch-up on all our podcasts with Arianna Huffington here.
18 Feb 19
Laptop Lifestyle Mums

Serina Bird had me at the title and cover and I knew right away I had to check this out! The Joyful Frugalista conveys the topics that I am passionate about sharing with my readers, and you will find some familiar ideas and concepts in the pages of this book that I have shared on […]

18 Feb 19
Clintons Tesol Blog

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines Attribution Theory as: “a theory that attempts to explain the interpretive process by which people make judgments about the causes of their own behavior and the behavior of others.”[1] The Collins English Dictionary gives further insight by stating that “the theory tries to explain how people link actions and emotions to […]

18 Feb 19
lynnette therese sauer

It’s mid-February which means I’m overdue for my year-in-books post. It’s been about five years now since I started keeping track of each book I read, after a friend recommended GoodReads to me. This year, instead of just keeping a list of titles, I had a goal to practice writing about what I’m reading. I set […]

18 Feb 19
McKinley Parent Teacher Club

Sign-up for a free parent workshop, Grit/Growth Mindset, starting on February 25th on campus in the Staff Lounge from 8:45am-9:45am. This unique workshop conducted by Dr. Susan Wais, a renowned psychologist in the field of Positive Psychology, will be held on Mondays for four weeks, February 25, March 4, 11 and 18th. This workshop will […]

18 Feb 19
Willow and Thatch

Here’s to crime! Thanks to the smash success of recent Agatha Christie adaptations, like Kenneth Branagh’s “Murder on the Orient Express” and BBC One’s “And Then There Were None,” there’s been a renewed interest in adapting the queen of crime’s novels for the screen. In an ongoing series for Willow and Thatch, Abby Murphy will […]

18 Feb 19
Life of Shelby Lester

I am about 7 weeks away from graduating with my associates in Liberal Arts and I have a choice to make. For me it is a very hard choice. Behind door number 1 I have Psychology. For me psych is easy. It’s like writing out my ABCs. However, behind door number 2 is Interior Design. […]

18 Feb 19
ExcitED

Since the military first introduced the ADDIE model and the concept of instructional design in the 70s, the field has seen the evolution of numerous theories and processes surrounding the practice and principles.  Regardless of theory or procedural steps, at its most basic, instructional design is the process of developing a creative treatment used to […]

18 Feb 19
Gnarls and Knots

So you’ve found your ancestors on census records, and you have obtained copies of their birth, marriage, and death records. But what other records are available? Come to NERGC 2019 in Manchester, NH from April 3rd through April 6th to find out from Carol McCoy! Carol will be offering 3 presentations at this year’s conference: […]