Purdy

18 Apr 19
Job Search Engine And Aggregation

Class A CDL Driver – $7.5K Sign-On – $70K Avg Pay – Newburgh, NY WHY JOIN McLANE 1-DAY ROUTES HOME DAILY GENEROUS BENEFITS INDUSTRY-LEADING 401(K) WITH COMPANY MATCH COMPANY-PAID LIFE INSURANCE TUITION REIMBURSEMENT HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, AND LIFE INSURANCE BEGIN YOUR 1ST DAY OF EMPLOYMENT. REQUIRE…… For more details: https://jobs-search.org/logistics/class-a-cdl-driver-7-5k-sign-on-70k-avg-pay-mclane-purdys-apply-in-purdys_i12401393 Source: https://www.jobisite.com/ext-find-Class%20A-jobs-in-Purdys.htm

18 Apr 19
Hometown Daily News

Baseball Branson at Webb City Hollister at Reeds Spring Forsyth at Skyline Blue Eye at Hurley Galena at Purdy Southwest at Spokane Pea Ridge at Berryville Lead Hill at Alpena Valley Springs at Bergman Soccer Webb City at Branson G Green Forest at Eureka Springs B/G Softball Forsyth at Fair Grove Purdy at Blue Eye […]

18 Apr 19
Sports360AZ

ASU brought in three quarterbacks in their latest recruiting class, but that did not stop them from offering the top uncommitted 2020 quarterback in the state. Excited and honored to receive an offer from Arizona State University! Thank you @CoachLikensASU! #hometownhero🔱 pic.twitter.com/c26Erukbp5 — Chubba Purdy (@chubbapurdy1234) April 18, 2019 Chubba Purdy added an offer from […]

18 Apr 19
Moultraysbuildanark.com

43/46 of daily Lenten blog… Today I had a couple interesting folks to see. Moe (not his real name) 53, tells me he was sitting in his home this past December when a bullet tore through his elbow, fracturing it.  The bullet wasn’t intended for him, but bullets have a funny way of traveling a […]

18 Apr 19
United States Naval Academy Class of 1976

1976 Intercollegiate Rowing Association Champions By Joe McGowan ’76 As I’m sure everyone knows, the first athletic competition where USNA engaged an external foe was in the sport of rowing.  USNA triumphed over Quaker City in Philadelphia, beginning a storied history.  150 years having passed, seven members of the class of ’76 were in Annapolis […]

17 Apr 19
Austools Direct

XL SWAN BRUSH

  • Polyester/nylon blend filaments
  • Beavertail, natural hardwood handle
  • Square edge, brushed copper ferrule
  • For all paints
  • Varnish and enamel brush
  • Thickness: 7/8″
17 Apr 19
TODAY NEWS

FILLERS, falsies, Hollywood waxes and hair extensions are the norm for many…

17 Apr 19
The Scottish Sun
FILLERS, falsies, Hollywood waxes and hair extensions are the norm for many teenage girls. Yet they would have been alien concepts to their mums at that age. These days beauty is a bigger business than ever. And the pressure to look a certain way is fuelled by social media and reality TV shows. Mother and daughter Leah and Kellie have very different beauty habits But is it all just playing into youngsters’ insecurities? Last year NHS England slammed the placement of cosmetic surgery ads during TV’s Love Island. To highlight the contrast between the pressures today and 20 years ago, LYNSEY CLARKE and CLAIRE DUNWELL quizzed an Essex mum and her 18-year old daughter about their beauty habits and attitudes. Student Leah Sharman spends £3,500 a year on looking good, while mum Kellie, 46, forks out £400. Leah has grown up with reality TV and social media WHEN it comes to looking good, no expense is spared by teen Leah Sharman – what she spends a year on her appearance would turn her mum’s hair grey. A big fan of Towie and other reality TV shows, the 18-year-old student splashes out £3,500 a year on beauty products and treatments This compares to the far more modest £400 that mum Kellie, 46, spends on herself. Kellie, a family support worker, blames social media for her eldest daughter’s obsession with her looks, and feels sad for a generation that seems constantly striving to keep up with the Kardashians. Leah is influenced by reality TV shows like Towie She says: “The world has gone crazy on what the younger generation think they should look like and social media is to blame.” Leah, who is studying hair and media make-up, admits: “I love the Towie look. I wouldn’t go anywhere without make-up. “I wear make-up in all my Instagram photos so I’d feel anxious if people looked at me because I didn’t look the same. “If I have to be at college by lunchtime I spend most of the morning getting ready, at least two hours. “Ever since I was 13, I have loved make-up and cared about my body image. Leah admits she wanted to look like the girls she saw on social media “I started watching make-up tutorials on YouTube. I saved up pocket money to buy designer brands of mascaras and lipsticks and sat for hours each night practising my look. “All my friends wore make-up to school. I was really skinny back then and I hated it. “Wearing make-up gave me confidence. I put myself under pressure to look like the popular girls in school. “Until I found Instagram, I had only seen what my mum did with her beauty routine. She put moisturiser on her face and wore hardly any make-up. Mum Kellie prefers to use little to no make-up “I wanted to look like the girls on social media — fully made up and immaculate.” Leah lives at home with Mum, dad Keith, 47, a production shift manager, and her younger sister Grace, 15, in Horton-On-The-Hill in Essex. She is dating footballer Billy Purdy, 18, who plays for Essex Senior League club Southend Manor, and will not go anywhere without her face on. She says: “I have a part-time job as a make-up artist at Mac and most of what I earn goes on skincare. “My routine is exhausting and includes facial mists and masks. Mum Kellie says waxing was unheard of when she was growing up “If one of my favourite celebrities is promoting an expensive product on Instagram, I look for a cheaper version online. “Social media puts girls like me under a lot of pressure even though we know that what we see isn’t real life. “I reapply fake tan every three days, I have acrylic or gel nails done every three weeks and use a dermaroller on my face once a month to stimulate collagen and remove facial fluff. “I do at-home teeth whitening, and I get my hair cut every month. I blow-dry it daily and get new hair extensions every six months. [bc_video video_id=”6022019926001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Liquid nose jobs are on the rise as women get filler injected into their face”] “But now I’ve added up what I spend I realise I could be spending on more important things.” Her mum believes that Leah would not spend so long in front of the mirror were it not for being bombarded by glamorous images. Kellie says: “It’s social media that gives Leah a bad body image. It used to drive me mad when she put a full face of make-up on for school. “It is sad that girls feel so much pressure to look a certain way because of pictures they see online. Leah reapplies fake tan every three days “They model themselves on reality TV stars and celebrities who share pouting, filtered photos. “When I was growing up, my idol was my English teacher. I loved her casual style and went to school wearing lots of bangles to copy her. “Back then, it wasn’t about caking on make-up. I only had mascara, lipstick and a bottle of foundation. “Girls went for the natural look and only wore make-up for work or a night out. It would take me 20 minutes. Kellie does squats every night before she showers “Leah on the other hand has a small suitcase for her products — I wouldn’t know what to do with half of them. She goes mad when I remove my make-up with wipes and apply foundation with my fingers. “She tells me pulling at my face will give me more wrinkles. “It makes her laugh when I use a hair dye which costs less than a fiver because she spends hundreds on her hair over the year. “Nowadays, I don’t wear lipstick and I’ve been using the same bronzer for years. The only time I buy make-up is when it runs out and I only paint my toe nails if I am wearing sandals.” [bc_video video_id=”6025897059001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Ashley Graham’s lip kits sell out in FOUR HOURS after model promotes it on Instagram “] It is not just the importance of beauty products where mum and daughter differ, their views on body hair are totally at odds, too. Leah says: “At 15, I got into watching Towie. I’d already begged Mum to let me have my legs waxed but the girls were having all their body hair removed, which gave me the idea to do it too. “Lots of my friends were having waxing done before holidays but I started shaving at every shower because it was easier. “It became normal to take all the hair off my body, including the hair on my arms. “Loads of boys expect girls to be hairless down there — maybe because of internet porn — but I don’t do it for that. I hate the feel of it and I prefer to have smooth skin. “My boyfriend Billy says he doesn’t care either way, but I think he might find it gross if I suddenly had full-on body hair.” [boxout headline=”Leah, 18”]Skincare:  £92 a year on cleanser, toner, masks, etc Tan: £280 on mousse Hair removal: £387 on face, bikini, legs and shaving Nails: £480, goes every three weeks Facials: £140, 4 visits Teeth: £120 on at-home whitening kits Cosmetics: £1,301 on make-up and lashes Hair: £680 on cuts, extensions, serums and heat protectors Total: £3,480 [/boxout] Kellie says: “When I was growing up waxing was unheard of. We wouldn’t have dreamed of taking off all our body hair. It wasn’t the norm and, for me, it still isn’t. “We didn’t have access to internet pornography where women are completely hairless, but that image has become relatively normal for the younger generation and it’s wrong. I don’t understand why Leah does it.” Today’s trend for hourglass bodies like Kim Kardashian’s, has also left Leah craving a curvier figure. She says: “Everyone wants to be curvier. Every night before I shower, I do squats to get a more shapely bum, and I do crunches. Kellie is happy in her own skin and doesn’t want to change anything “I wish I was more laid back, like Mum. She’s amazing. I don’t think I will look like her when I’m her age unless I keep up with my routine. “On the days I do feel good about myself, I compare myself to pictures on Instagram and it brings me back down — everyone looks so amazing.” Kellie says: “I am shocked to hear how much time and money Leah spends on her appearance. “She is naturally gorgeous but she doesn’t see it, which is crazy. “Sometimes I wish my boobs were smaller and that I could lose a bit of weight, but overall I am happy in my own skin. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”1″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] “Nowadays, lots of girls struggle to accept the looks they have been given. If they want thicker lips, they have fillers, or get Botox at the first sign of wrinkles. I hope Leah never resorts to any of that. “Hopefully when she’s older, she’ll relax about her body image and learn to love herself the way she is. [boxout headline=”Kellie, 46″]Hair: £317.80 Make-up: £33 on mascara, foundation and bronzer Eyebrows: £36 on a bi-annual wax Skincare: £20 on moisturiser Total: £406.80 [/boxout] [authenticated-scripts src=”%3Cscript%20src%3D%22https%3A%2F%2Fxd.wayin.com%2Fembed%2Fe8d3b7eb-4b11-4f98-998b-f773dc60c179%3Fmode%3Dresponsive%22%3E%3C%2Fscript%3E” type=”embedded” width=”100″ /]
17 Apr 19
The Irish Sun
FILLERS, falsies, Hollywood waxes and hair extensions are the norm for many teenage girls. Yet they would have been alien concepts to their mums at that age. These days beauty is a bigger business than ever. And the pressure to look a certain way is fuelled by social media and reality TV shows. Mother and daughter Leah and Kellie have very different beauty habits But is it all just playing into youngsters’ insecurities? Last year NHS England slammed the placement of cosmetic surgery ads during TV’s Love Island. To highlight the contrast between the pressures today and 20 years ago, LYNSEY CLARKE and CLAIRE DUNWELL quizzed an Essex mum and her 18-year old daughter about their beauty habits and attitudes. Student Leah Sharman spends £3,500 a year on looking good, while mum Kellie, 46, forks out £400. Leah has grown up with reality TV and social media WHEN it comes to looking good, no expense is spared by teen Leah Sharman – what she spends a year on her appearance would turn her mum’s hair grey. A big fan of Towie and other reality TV shows, the 18-year-old student splashes out £3,500 a year on beauty products and treatments This compares to the far more modest £400 that mum Kellie, 46, spends on herself. Kellie, a family support worker, blames social media for her eldest daughter’s obsession with her looks, and feels sad for a generation that seems constantly striving to keep up with the Kardashians. Leah is influenced by reality TV shows like Towie She says: “The world has gone crazy on what the younger generation think they should look like and social media is to blame.” Leah, who is studying hair and media make-up, admits: “I love the Towie look. I wouldn’t go anywhere without make-up. “I wear make-up in all my Instagram photos so I’d feel anxious if people looked at me because I didn’t look the same. “If I have to be at college by lunchtime I spend most of the morning getting ready, at least two hours. “Ever since I was 13, I have loved make-up and cared about my body image. Leah admits she wanted to look like the girls she saw on social media “I started watching make-up tutorials on YouTube. I saved up pocket money to buy designer brands of mascaras and lipsticks and sat for hours each night practising my look. “All my friends wore make-up to school. I was really skinny back then and I hated it. “Wearing make-up gave me confidence. I put myself under pressure to look like the popular girls in school. “Until I found Instagram, I had only seen what my mum did with her beauty routine. She put moisturiser on her face and wore hardly any make-up. Mum Kellie prefers to use little to no make-up “I wanted to look like the girls on social media — fully made up and immaculate.” Leah lives at home with Mum, dad Keith, 47, a production shift manager, and her younger sister Grace, 15, in Horton-On-The-Hill in Essex. She is dating footballer Billy Purdy, 18, who plays for Essex Senior League club Southend Manor, and will not go anywhere without her face on. She says: “I have a part-time job as a make-up artist at Mac and most of what I earn goes on skincare. “My routine is exhausting and includes facial mists and masks. Mum Kellie says waxing was unheard of when she was growing up “If one of my favourite celebrities is promoting an expensive product on Instagram, I look for a cheaper version online. “Social media puts girls like me under a lot of pressure even though we know that what we see isn’t real life. “I reapply fake tan every three days, I have acrylic or gel nails done every three weeks and use a dermaroller on my face once a month to stimulate collagen and remove facial fluff. “I do at-home teeth whitening, and I get my hair cut every month. I blow-dry it daily and get new hair extensions every six months. [bc_video video_id=”6022019926001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Liquid nose jobs are on the rise as women get filler injected into their face”] “But now I’ve added up what I spend I realise I could be spending on more important things.” Her mum believes that Leah would not spend so long in front of the mirror were it not for being bombarded by glamorous images. Kellie says: “It’s social media that gives Leah a bad body image. It used to drive me mad when she put a full face of make-up on for school. “It is sad that girls feel so much pressure to look a certain way because of pictures they see online. Leah reapplies fake tan every three days “They model themselves on reality TV stars and celebrities who share pouting, filtered photos. “When I was growing up, my idol was my English teacher. I loved her casual style and went to school wearing lots of bangles to copy her. “Back then, it wasn’t about caking on make-up. I only had mascara, lipstick and a bottle of foundation. “Girls went for the natural look and only wore make-up for work or a night out. It would take me 20 minutes. Kellie does squats every night before she showers “Leah on the other hand has a small suitcase for her products — I wouldn’t know what to do with half of them. She goes mad when I remove my make-up with wipes and apply foundation with my fingers. “She tells me pulling at my face will give me more wrinkles. “It makes her laugh when I use a hair dye which costs less than a fiver because she spends hundreds on her hair over the year. “Nowadays, I don’t wear lipstick and I’ve been using the same bronzer for years. The only time I buy make-up is when it runs out and I only paint my toe nails if I am wearing sandals.” [bc_video video_id=”6025897059001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Ashley Graham’s lip kits sell out in FOUR HOURS after model promotes it on Instagram “] It is not just the importance of beauty products where mum and daughter differ, their views on body hair are totally at odds, too. Leah says: “At 15, I got into watching Towie. I’d already begged Mum to let me have my legs waxed but the girls were having all their body hair removed, which gave me the idea to do it too. “Lots of my friends were having waxing done before holidays but I started shaving at every shower because it was easier. “It became normal to take all the hair off my body, including the hair on my arms. “Loads of boys expect girls to be hairless down there — maybe because of internet porn — but I don’t do it for that. I hate the feel of it and I prefer to have smooth skin. “My boyfriend Billy says he doesn’t care either way, but I think he might find it gross if I suddenly had full-on body hair.” [boxout headline=”Leah, 18”]Skincare:  £92 a year on cleanser, toner, masks, etc Tan: £280 on mousse Hair removal: £387 on face, bikini, legs and shaving Nails: £480, goes every three weeks Facials: £140, 4 visits Teeth: £120 on at-home whitening kits Cosmetics: £1,301 on make-up and lashes Hair: £680 on cuts, extensions, serums and heat protectors Total: £3,480 [/boxout] Kellie says: “When I was growing up waxing was unheard of. We wouldn’t have dreamed of taking off all our body hair. It wasn’t the norm and, for me, it still isn’t. “We didn’t have access to internet pornography where women are completely hairless, but that image has become relatively normal for the younger generation and it’s wrong. I don’t understand why Leah does it.” Today’s trend for hourglass bodies like Kim Kardashian’s, has also left Leah craving a curvier figure. She says: “Everyone wants to be curvier. Every night before I shower, I do squats to get a more shapely bum, and I do crunches. Kellie is happy in her own skin and doesn’t want to change anything “I wish I was more laid back, like Mum. She’s amazing. I don’t think I will look like her when I’m her age unless I keep up with my routine. “On the days I do feel good about myself, I compare myself to pictures on Instagram and it brings me back down — everyone looks so amazing.” Kellie says: “I am shocked to hear how much time and money Leah spends on her appearance. “She is naturally gorgeous but she doesn’t see it, which is crazy. “Sometimes I wish my boobs were smaller and that I could lose a bit of weight, but overall I am happy in my own skin. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”1″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] “Nowadays, lots of girls struggle to accept the looks they have been given. If they want thicker lips, they have fillers, or get Botox at the first sign of wrinkles. I hope Leah never resorts to any of that. “Hopefully when she’s older, she’ll relax about her body image and learn to love herself the way she is. [boxout headline=”Kellie, 46″]Hair: £317.80 Make-up: £33 on mascara, foundation and bronzer Eyebrows: £36 on a bi-annual wax Skincare: £20 on moisturiser Total: £406.80 [/boxout] [authenticated-scripts src=”%3Cscript%20src%3D%22https%3A%2F%2Fxd.wayin.com%2Fembed%2Fe8d3b7eb-4b11-4f98-998b-f773dc60c179%3Fmode%3Dresponsive%22%3E%3C%2Fscript%3E” type=”embedded” width=”100″ /]
17 Apr 19

FILLERS, falsies, Hollywood waxes and hair extensions are the norm for many teenage girls. Yet they would have been alien concepts to their mums at that age. These days beauty is a bigger business than ever. And the pressure to look a certain way is fuelled by social media and reality TV shows. Mother and daughter […]

17 Apr 19
Bham Now

SliceFest is headed to Lakeview Saturday, June 1. We’ve got the details on who’s playing at the 8th annual block party of epic proportions put on by Slice Pizza & Brewhouse.

17 Apr 19
Quartz
The burger will probably go for $50 a pop, but can you really put a price on the experience of being one of the first people in the world to literally taste the future? On April 15, Bruce Friedrich ascended a stage in Vancouver, Canada to give a TED Talk to a packed room about how cell-cultured meats might one day feed the global population the meat it craves, only grown from cells in bioreactors, without all the environmental degradation that comes with raising and slaughtering livestock. This is all stuff that Friedrich—the executive director of the Good Food Institute, a non-profit organization that supports cell-cultured meat startups and sometimes lobbies on their behalf—has said before. What is new is that, in an interview after his speech, he estimated a price for the first bites of cell-cultured meat products when they debut into restaurants. Friedrich attached the $50 price tag to a burger, but he added in a later interview that the first meat could just as easily be chicken, fish, or something else. “Since the process is the same for all of it, I’ll be surprised if there is a significant price differential depending on species,” Friedrich says. He said he thinks cell-cultured meats will become available in limited spots in 2020, though at least one Silicon Valley startup, JUST, has said it will get a product to market even sooner. The price of cell-cultured meat depends on a company’s ability to produce a lot of it. The process was much more expensive in the early stages, when the work was being done in laboratories and under microscopes. But now companies are starting to move out of the physical laboratory and are beginning to use more automated systems. In 2013, Mark Post, a Dutch scientist and the co-founder of Mosa Meats, became the first person in the world to make a cell-cultured beef burger. The process he used was really expensive, taking three lab technicians about three months to nurture the 20,000 fibers of the burger, according to AgFunder News. That pound of lab-made beef would have cost $1.2 million per pound to sell. In the years following, that number has plummeted. In March 2017, Memphis Meats told the Wall Street Journal that it’d gotten the price of a pound of cell-cultured chicken down to $9,000 per pound. A year later its CEO announced the price had dropped to below $1,000 per pound. And in early 2019, the Israeli-based company Aleph Farms told reporters they’d gotten a beef patty down to around $100 per pound.
17 Apr 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
To the Editor: We have all been to events at Purdy Hall.  Indeed, it is the largest community hall that we have in Ukiah, and we are lucky to have it as a venue. Many of the charity events that take place year after year happen here. Here is my observation and opinion. Please consider investing in your infrastructure just a bit more. Buy a decent P.A. system for Purdy Hall renters. The poor sound quality, in my personal opinion, is the biggest negative and detractor for any renters. You should know this. Investing in a good P.A. sound system is a strong investment in both the concerns of the Hall, as well as the entities that rent it. My wife and I have been to many events here in Ukiah at several different locations including Purdy Hall. Purdy hall is used for events that benefit the community. We can all agree on this. Purdy hall is used for many charity events to drum up funds to help them throughout the year. We can all agree on this as well. Well, Purdy hall to me seems inefficient. Simply put, if you could hear Sheriff Tom Allman better at an auction, I promise you that the auction would take in more money,….for charity. Money is left on the table because of poor communication because of a poor P.A. system (Public Address) If you can’t hear, or it sounds bad, everything suffers. I promise you that if a band sounds better and people are dancing, then they will stay longer and spend more money. This benefits the people and organizations that are renting this facility. If people can hear in the back of the room what a bid is on an auctioned item, then they might bid. If they can’t hear, then they become disengaged. People start getting louder in the back of the room to talk versus hearing what the events are about.  If people can hear better, then they are more engaged, and if they are more engaged, then they have more fun at an event, and they can focus more on the cause or reason for the event. If I owned Purdy hall, I would take the steps to make it the best in Ukiah,….not just the biggest in Ukiah. Please entertain the idea of providing a sound system worthy of a hall this size. This is just my humble opinion. I know sound, and I am quite sure that I am right. It’s a “sound” investment. -Angus Young, Ukiah