Rains

22 Feb 19
The Sun
FEBRUARY, on the whole, has been pretty glorious. Many of us have bounded about in just our jackets for the past month, wondering where winter went. Tissues at the ready – hay fever season may be about to start But beautiful weather isn’t welcome by everyone. A premature spell of dry, sunny, warm weather can bring hay fever season forward – extending the months of irritable misery suffered by thousands. “We are likely to see an early start to the birch pollen season, which affects around 25 per cent of hay fever sufferers in the spring,” hay fever expert and pollen forecaster, Dr Beverley Adams-Groom told The Sun. “The season usually starts in early April but could start in mid-to-late March this year. Tropical air blowing across Britain will bring warm weather to the UK hotter than Egypt Temperatures are expected to be unseasonably warm over the coming days “The grass pollen season (usually starting in late May/early June) could be on the early side too but it’s too soon to say because it’s the weather in late March and April that mainly affects it.” Hay fever season as a whole tends to run between late March and September, and it’s at its worst usually around June, when it’s warm, humid and windy. But seeing as this month, we’ve seen record-breaking temperatures in Scotland of 18.2’C – the average temperature of late May/early June – it’s not surprising that hay fever issues might be starting earlier this year. For grass pollen to really become strong, you need warm and rather wet weather, so it depends on whether we get any April showers or not. Pollen season can start as early as January But for those who suffer from birch pollen sensitivities, you may start struggling sooner rather than later. Hay fever is a problem for around 80 per cent of people with asthma, with many not knowing that trees start releasing their pollen at this time of the year. “It isn’t spring yet, but trees such as alder and hazel releasing pollen could wreak havoc on people with asthma who are allergic to it,” Sonia Munde, Head of Services at Asthma UK, told The Sun. “A pollen allergy can cause winter hay fever, triggering asthma symptoms such as wheezing or a tight chest that could develop into a full-blown asthma attack. “People with asthma might assume their blocked nose and sneezing is caused by common cold but it could be tree pollen at this time of year. “If you know you have a pollen allergy as well as asthma, it is essential you take your preventer medicines as prescribed, as it will prevent your airways from becoming inflamed which means you’ll be less likely to have an asthma attack if you come into contact with pollen. “You should also take your hay fever medicines, such as nasal steroid sprays and antihistamines, which will help keep your hay fever symptoms at bay. Keep your blue reliever inhaler with you at all times in case of an emergency.” [boxout headline=”Symptoms of hay fever”] Hay fever symptoms tend to become more severe when the pollen count is high. They can include: itchy eyes/ throat sneezing, blocked/runny nose watering, red eyes (allergic conjunctivitis) headaches, blocked sinuses shortness of breath tiredness the sensation of mucus running down the back of the throat, which can also be a symptom, is called “post-nasal drip” [/boxout] So what can you do about it? Well, it’s simply a case of extending your coping mechanisms and preparing for an attack earlier on. 1. Monitor pollen forecasts every day and when you notice them start to climb, try to stay indoors If it rains (which could happen at any point during February and spring…), pollen tends to be washed from the air so the levels go down. 2. On high pollen days, make sure you shower and wash your hair as soon as you get home Don’t forget to stick your clothes in the washing basket ASAP too and take your shoes off inside to avoid trampling any pollen indoors. 3. Take antihistamines at the right time. If you don’t get drowsy, and most people don’t, it may make sense to take them first thing in the morning so that their peak effectiveness is during the course of the day when you are out and about,” Dr Sarah Jarvis told The Sun. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON HAY FEVER” term_id=”12449″ posts_number=”12″ /] “However, if they do make you drowsy you may find that it’s more effective to take it at night so the drowsiness effect is most marked when you are sleeping. “Part of the problem with hay fever is it depends on when your symptoms start, pollen counts tend to be higher during the day. “So we normally say if you are going to go out, go out early in the morning or late in the evening as pollen counts tend to be lower then.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours
22 Feb 19
Itim Na Tinta

The Hundred Islands National Park is located at Alaminos City of  Pangasinan. It is also known as “Kapulo-puloan” or “Taytay-Bakes,” these little Islands are one of the most splendid natural geological formations in the Philippines. The islands are disseminated along the Lingayen Gulf and have a total land area of 1,844 hectares or 18.44 square […]

22 Feb 19
How to do easily - Learn How to do Tasks Easily

[ad_1] Harry Guinness Although you can take great landscape shots with your camera only, the right equipment makes it easy and gives you more options. I am a big fan of landscape photography and so I thought a lot. Everything on this list is something that I have personally used. Let yourself dig in and […]

22 Feb 19
Social News XYZ

Download logoNearly 7 million people in South Sudan could face acute food insecurity at the height of this lean season (May-July), three United Nations agencies warned today, urging for scaled-up humanitarian assistance and better access to humanitarian relief. The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) report released today in Juba by the Government of South […]

22 Feb 19
Senior Advocates of Supreme Court of India

The highest Criminal Lawyer In Chandigarh High Court They might make clear decisions or the requirements of explicit packages, law firms Chandigarh attend conferences and ask clarifying questions nonetheless, greatest law firm in Chandigarh as a result of the child’s dad and mother, greatest law firm in Chandigarh you make the selection. The second you’ve […]

22 Feb 19
Aaron Gerry

You’d think there might be big epiphanies after 31 years of existence. But that’s not the case. At least for me anyway.

Instead, I ruminate on and offer a list of 31 things I’m grateful for.

22 Feb 19
Ottawa Citizen

Think of the next 48 hours or so as a little gift from the weather gods for having put up with their crankiness over the past few weeks. Just don’t get used to it. The forecast is for sunny skies right Saturday night or so, with daily highs right around the 0 C mark. Even […]

22 Feb 19
8qwu59er8

With a low of 41F and a high of 43F. via IFTTT

22 Feb 19
Itim Na Tinta

  The Hundred Islands National Park is located at Alaminos City of  Pangasinan. It is also known as “Kapulo-puloan” or “Taytay-Bakes,” these little Islands are one of the most splendid natural geological formations in the Philippines. The islands are disseminated along the Lingayen Gulf and have a total land area of 1,844 hectares or 18.44 […]

22 Feb 19
a new nature blog

To me, forty days is a nice round number. It doesn’t fit in well with our time cycles of days, weeks and months, but it undoubtedly has great symbolic meaning, the  most famous of which, perhaps, is the 40 days and 40 nights of rain that caused Noah’s Flood – and transformed the world, cleaning […]

22 Feb 19
Volpe

SPEND, SPEND, SPEND!

22 Feb 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
Note: Blue oak (Quercus douglasii), gray pine (Pinus sabiniana), and buckeye (Aesculus californica) are three species that thrive in rugged local foothill woodland and chaparral habitat. Today and in the following weeks, this series will look at these species and the adaptive strategies they have evolved over time to thrive in their challenging environment. What drives the evolutionary journey of the flora and fauna that populate our globe? Darwin, the product of a strictly codified class society beset by enormous economic inequalities, identified a major factor of evolution to be competition for finite resources. Those species that clambered to the top of the evolutionary heap benefitted from genetic mutations and / or adaptations that gave them a biological edge over their competitors. Some species cooperate by sharing resources. For example, in Tortuguero, a tiny strip of beach along the northeastern shoulder of Costa Rica, four separate species of sea turtle lay their eggs each year. They migrate to the beach at different times, ranging from early March to October, and feed on different resources. Millions of turtles, and untold numbers of their babies, have shared the same tiny piece of real estate for eons. Here in our own backyard, there are species that have evolved to exploit ecological niches that very few others claim. These are the various oaks, conifers, and woody shrubs that populate the foothill woodland and chaparral zone of the Western Sierra Nevada and Coast Range mountains. A dominant species in this environmental nook is the blue oak (Quercus douglasii). According to Andrew Conlin, Soil Scientist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), “the presence of blue oak woodlands indicates really rough growing conditions: shallow, tough soils” as opposed to the rich loamy soils of the valley, which are preferred by valley oaks. Quercus douglasii also goes by a number of other common names, including white oak, mountain oak, mountain white oak, and iron oak. But it acquired its most familiar and descriptive common name from the same person from whom its Latin binomial (scientific name) is derived. In 1831 David Douglas, a Scottish botanist, christened it the blue oak for the bluish cast of its deeply lobed leaves. (A digression: Douglas, for whom the Douglas-fir and hundreds of other western plants are named, lived from 1799 to 1834. He made three trips to the American Northwest between 1823 and 1831, encountering the blue oak on his last trip while traveling from the Columbia River in Oregon to San Francisco. He died under curious circumstances, apparently after falling into a bull trap while climbing Mauna Kea in Hawai’i.) Blue oaks are native to California’s foothills, South Coast Range, North Coast Range and San Francisco Bay Area, forming a botanical loop around the Central Valley. Depending on the source consulted, these trees average between 30 and 80 feet tall. But all sources agree that the blue oak is the most drought tolerant of all the deciduous oaks in the state. Surviving drought and fire Adaptations to survive the long, hot, dry summers and sparse winter rains of our Mediterranean climate include thick leaves with a bluish-green color. According to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), blue-gray-green leaf color reduces heat absorption. During severely hot and dry years, blue oaks will sometimes shed their leaves and go dormant to conserve energy, allowing these tough little oaks to survive temperatures above 100° F for several weeks at a time. Like many plants growing in marginal soils, blue oaks are slow growers, usually increasing only a few inches each year. A further strategy to survive drought and fire conditions is the blue oak’s extensive root system, which allows it to grow through cracks in rocks to depths of 80 feet in order to reach ground water, helping it to survive in fire-prone and arid regions (Blue Planet Biomes). Although blue oaks can tolerate fast-burning grass fires, they have less success in surviving hotter brush fires, according to University of California Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UCANR). If a tree does survive a fire event, it can reproduce both through seeds and by sprouting from burnt stumps. Blue oaks can produce sprouts after a low- to moderate-severity surface fire, and younger trees have the edge on older trees for fire survival odds. On younger trees, the light-colored bark (hence “white oak”) is thick and helps reduce fire damage, the USDA notes, whereas the bark of mature blue oaks is thin and will flake off as the trees age, making older blue oaks less insulated against fire. After a fire, blue oaks can also re-establish from acorns that have dropped from surviving parent trees and/or been dispersed by animals, among other possibilities. USDA research also reveals that the blue oak’s post-fire recovery is likely aided by the fact that it withstands extreme drought by dropping leaves under water stress and producing a flush of new leaves when wet weather returns. In fact, in wet years, crown-scorched blue oaks may produce a flush of new leaves soon after fire. Native American uses All parts of the blue oak were woven deeply into the culture and survival of California’s native peoples. It was one of more than a dozen oak species whose acorns contributed a major source of dietary nutrients and calories. Because of their superior flavor, blue oak acorns were among the most commonly gathered. A Plant Guide published by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides an exhaustive list of the ways California Native Americans used blue oak wood, bark, and acorns, including as “medicine, dyes, utensils, games, toys, and construction materials.” Locally, the Maidu used oak shoots to frame cradleboards and oak posts to construct shelter, and the Yana used an oak paddle in cooking. Traps for birds were baited with acorns, and split acorns became dice for gambling. Besides providing physical sustenance to native peoples, I imagine that the peaceful beauty of blue oak woodlands fed their souls. Twisted, dwarfed blue oak silhouettes are a classic component of the California landscape. These trees are prime examples of successful adaptation to truly demanding habitat and climate conditions.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Rising From the Ashes Master Gardeners are taking note of the vegetation emerging on property destroyed by the Camp Fire. On Fay Crociani’s Upper Paradise lot, native salvia reappeared in early January, sprouting from roots of plants that had burned to the ground. A potted erodium (Alpine geranium) also showed leaves in January, followed in February by green leaves emerging from desiccated black iris rhizomes. More irises, planted in plastic pots, survived the fire even though the plastic melted around them, and other plants and leaves continue to rise from the scorched ground. Fay encourages folks to watch and see what comes up before totally digging up an area. She says “there is real magic and joy in my heart when I spot new growth. I know hundreds of plants will never come back, but many, many will if we have the patience to wait.”
22 Feb 19
Trust & Traction

The rain, snow, and sleet didn’t stop growers from attending our 2019 Winter Innovation Forum. We had more than 400 in attendance from Indiana and Ohio and welcomed them each to a day of information, insight and conversation. On this Photo Friday, we invite you to take a look at a few photos from the […]

22 Feb 19
misskoeking

Thursday 21 February 2019 I come thinking Today my body feels tired. Here, I get to listen to it. I woke up and stretched. My body didn’t want to stretch much. My hair needed a good wash. So did my body. I drank coffee and made oats. Then climbed back into bed. Today was a […]