Randall

22 Jul 19
BRProud.com
WASHINGTON, D.C. – As dollar stores sweep across America, they are facing growing scrutiny from opponents who argue that discount chains stifle local competition and limit poor communities’ access to healthy food. Dollar stores have never been more popular. Yet a wave of cities and towns have passed laws curbing the expansion of Dollar General and Dollar Tree, which bought Family Dollar in 2015. The companies are the two largest dollar store operators in the country, combining for more than 30,000 stores throughout the United States, up from under 20,000 a decade ago. By comparison, Walmart, America’s largest retailer, has 4,700 US stores. Advocates of tighter controls on dollar stores say the big chains intentionally cluster multiple stores in low-income areas. That strategy discourages supermarkets from opening and it threatens existing mom-and-pop grocers, critics say. “The business model for these stores is built on saturation,” said Julia McCarthy, senior policy associate at the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest and a critic of dollar stores. “When you have so many dollar stores in one neighborhood, there’s no incentive for a full-service grocery store to come in.” Opponents also express concerns that dollar stores don’t offer fresh produce. Dollar General and its dollar store rivals mostly sell snacks, drinks, canned foods and vegetables, household supplies and personal care products at rock-bottom prices. However, Dollar General and Dollar Tree argue that they benefit communities by offering shoppers convenient places to grab food and essentials at low prices. “In rural places without existing grocery stores, having a Dollar General might be viewed as an asset,” said Christopher Merrett, director of the Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs at Western Illinois University. Dollar stores bring in new sales and property tax revenue for cities, create jobs and expand shopping options for customers, he added. Dollar stores see an opportunity to grow even more in America. Dollar General and Dollar Tree have plans to open a combined additional 24,000 locations. But lawmakers around the country are pushing back. Last week, the city council in Birmingham, Alabama, unanimously approved legislationthat would prohibit new dollar stores from opening within a mile of their existing locations. “While dollar stores proliferated across our community, healthy food options dried up,” Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin told CNN Business. The new measure will help Birmingham attract and retain grocers in the city’s food deserts, he said. Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Mesquite, Texas, have also passed legislation limiting new dollar store openings. And officials in New Orleans, Cleveland and Fort Worth, Texas, are exploring plans to restrict dollar stores in their cities. “We are disappointed that a small number of policymakers have chosen to limit our ability to serve their communities,” said Crystal Ghassemi, spokesperson for Dollar General. “We believe the addition of each new Dollar General store represents positive economic growth for the communities we serve.” Dollar store growth Dollar stores have been around for decades. But they have flourished in the United States since the 2008 recession as more Americans were forced to tighten up their spending. Although the US economy has strengthened in recent years, dollar stores’ popularity has endured. Wages for a vast number of Americans have grown only modestly. People living paycheck to paycheck have been a boon for dollar stores, and the chains have also reached higher-income shoppers looking for discounts. “While the economy is doing very well, our core customer continues to struggle,” Dollar General chief executive Todd Vasos told analysts last year. The company’s core customers earn around $40,000 a year or below, $20,000 below the median income. Dollar General caters mainly to low-and-middle-income customers in rural and suburban areas. Dollar Tree targets suburban, middle-income shoppers, while Family Dollar focuses on lower-income urban and rural customers. Dollar General looks to build stores in rural areas where a big box retailer or grocery store is not within 15 or 20 miles. Around 75% of Dollar General stores are in towns with 20,000 or fewer people, and the chain has its biggest footprint in southern states. (Dollar General has more stores in Texas alone than Costco and Whole Foods do combined nationwide.) “Dollar General stores often choose to locate at the edge of a rural town, away from the traditional downtown” to draw customers, said Merrett from Western Illinois University. “This is not very different from what Walmart did 30 years ago.” Dollar stores can open quickly in new areas because they are small and have lower operating costs than grocery stores. Dollar General stores are 7,400 square feet on average, compared to 40,000 square-foot supermarkets. And stores, which employ just a handful of workers to stock aisles, are cheap to run. Mounting opposition However, critics say that dollar stores’ unchecked growth harms local communities. “Some communities see that dollar stores are very serious competitor to their local retail and grocery,” said David Procter, director of the Rural Grocery Initiative at Kansas State University. Family-owned grocery stores operate at razor-thin profit margins and dollar stores can pressure them with lower prices, experts say. Although most dollar stores don’t sell fresh groceries, they offer many of the same household products and daily essentials as grocers. Those goods are often the highest-margin items and grocery owners can’t afford to lose them, Procter noted. “When the dollar stores take the bulk of that business, it really is hurting their bottom line pretty significantly,” he said. Burnell Cotlon, owner of the Lower 9th Ward Market in New Orleans, said his grocery store suffered when Family Dollar opened up in the neighborhood. Cotlon lost valuable detergent, toothpaste and toiletry sales. “I had to push harder on other items to stay afloat,” said Cotlon, who has gained national recognition for opening one of the only grocery stores in New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward, which was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the Family Dollar recently closed, which drove customers back to Cotlon’s store. “As soon as they closed down, my toiletry items jumped back up.” Other local residents and business leaders worry that dollar stores’ concentration in urban areas deter grocery stores, which offer a wide range of produce and healthy options, from opening. “There are almost 100 dollar-type stores in a ten-mile radius,” said Fort Worth Councilwoman Kelly Allen Gray. “They are heavily located in low-to-moderate-income neighborhoods, which makes their presence feel predatory.” And Cleveland Councilman Blaine Griffin, who has introduced a moratorium on new dollar store openings, expressed concern that dollar stores do not offer fresh fruits or vegetables. “A lot of the people that live in our communities live in food deserts,” Griffin said. Dollar stores “drive out chains that actually offer good, healthy food options.” Dollar General’s produce initiative Dollar General is trying to fend off criticism that it does not sell healthy or fresh food. It has added around 125 “better for you” items to its shelves at approximately 3,400 stores. It plans to reach 6,000 stores by the end of 2019. The products appear under Dollar General’s Good & Smart house brand, and the store carries name brands like Annie’s, Back to Nature and Kashi. Dollar General has started to offer fruit and vegetables for the first time at around 500 stores, too. CEO Vasos said last year that Dollar General can “drive a tremendous amount of traffic” by adding produce in rural and urban food deserts. But opponents like McCarthy from the Center for Science in the Public Interest say Dollar General’s produce effort does not go far enough because it only reaches a fraction of the company’s more than 15,000 stores.
22 Jul 19
Download Steve Earle & The Dukes Guy (2019)

“Guy” track listing: 01. Dublin Blues02. Heartbroke03. The Last Gunfighter Ballad04. Out In the Parking Lot05. She Ain’t Going Nowhere06. Sis Draper07. New Cut Road08. Old Friends09. L.A. Freeway10. Texas 194711. Desperados Waiting for a Train12. Rita Ballou13. The Ballad of Laverne and Captain Flint14. The Randall Knife15. Anyhow I Love You16. That Old Time […]

22 Jul 19
Inside track

We will have a new prime minister on Wednesday, almost certainly Boris Johnson, and new ministers by the end of the week. What should the environmental sector hope for? Number 10 The environment has had a low profile in the Tory leadership context and Boris Johnson will have a lot on his plate. But given […]

22 Jul 19
News365.co.za

At the rate the talent is going on Idols SA, the show will have more wooden mic contestants and comedians than actual singers. But the level of entertainment is high and viewers can’t help but laugh along. Sunday night’s episode of the singing competition left many viewers laughing out loud, as the show became the […]

22 Jul 19
The Shutterstock Blog
Discover haute couture history with images of the groundbreaking models and innovative designers who modernized the fashion world. In 1965, Diana Vreeland, the editor-in-chief at ​Vogue, coined the term “Youthquake” to describe a cultural phenomenon. Young people came together, collectively reshaping politics, music, and not least of all, fashion. The Beatles took the world by storm, and so did the miniskirt. “There is a marvelous moment that starts at thirteen and wastes no time,” Vreeland wrote. “More dreamers. More doers. Here. Now. Youthquake 1965.” The 1960s and 1970s witnessed the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement, the women’s liberation movement, and the Stonewall Riots. As the world changed, so did the outfits. Models and designers eschewed the status quo and embraced the unconventional. During these decades, fashion was about far more than celebrity—it was about creating a better world. Let’s take a look at just a few of the models and designers who helped redefine the meaning of the word “glamor” forever. 1. Donyale Luna Donyale Luna, Skidoo, 1968. Photo by Paramount/Kobal/Shutterstock. The year was 1963. The British photographer David McCabe was on assignment in Detroit when, all of a sudden, he glimpsed a young woman. Wearing her typical Catholic school uniform, she stood at about six feet tall. If she had any interest in modeling, he told her to come to New York and contact him for help. Her name? Donyale Luna. Donyale Luna, Fellini’s Satyricon, 1969. Photo by P E A/Artistes Associes/Kobal/Shutterstock. Three years later, ​TIME​ magazine ​declared 1966​ “The Luna Year” in reference to the starlet, whom the writer described as “a new heavenly body.” That same year, she became the first African American supermodel to grace the cover of British ​Vogue​ and was named ​Vogue’s model of the year. In addition to her modeling, Luna appeared on the silver screen in films by Federico Fellini and Andy Warhol (she was a fixture of his Factory). She was also a muse to Salvador Dali. Donyale Luna, Federico Fellini, 1969. Photo by P E A/Artistes Associes/Kobal/Shutterstock. Still, it wasn’t an easy road. Prejudice and racism plagued those early years of Luna’s career, and some Southern companies withdrew their advertisements from magazines where she appeared. “On 17 May, it will be 40 years since my mother left us,” Luna’s daughter Dream Cazzaniga wrote​ earlier this year on the anniversary of her mother’s passing. “On that day, […] I will be hoping that the world is finally ready to celebrate a young African-American girl from Detroit who didn’t let others define her.” 2. Mary Quant British fashion designer Mary Quant wearing a plaid skirt. Photo by Jim Bland/Penske Media/Shutterstock. This English fashion designer helped define the “Swinging Sixties” with her signature miniskirts, hotpants, and ‘skinny rib’ sweaters. Her boutique, Bazaar, drew a younger crowd with long hours, loud music, and drinks. “The clothes reflected the sense of freedom that we felt at the time,” Quant ​told​ ​The Guardian​ earlier this year. “Shorter skirts allowed mobility, to run, jump and to have fun in.” British fashion designer Mary Quant wearing a plaid skirt and polka dot shirt. Photo by Nick Machalaba/Penske Media/Shutterstock. The V&A has organized a Quant retrospective, on view now through February 16, 2020. When they started research on the exhibition, the museum received more than a ​thousand emails​ from women all over the world, each willing to lend their own personal pieces–a true testament to the designer’s influence. 3. Veruschka Veruschka, Blowup – 1966. Photo by Mgm/Kobal/Shutterstock. “It’s not so bad to be different, ​ne?” Veruschka asked ​Life​ magazine in 1967. As a child, she’d stood out for her tall frame, but by this point, she had embraced all the features that made her unique. And so had the rest of the world. The title of that ​Life​ cover story? “The Girl Everybody Stares At.” Veruschka, David Hemmings, Blowup – 1966. Photo by Mgm/Kobal/Shutterstock. A year earlier, she’d famously appeared in ​Blowup, directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. She went on to grace the cover of ​Vogue ​ thirteen times, becoming one of the most sought-after supermodels of her time. Richard Avedon named her the most beautiful woman in the world. Susan Sontag called hers an “indomitable career of beauty.” David Hemmings, Veruschka, Blowup – 1966. Photo by Mgm/Kobal/Shutterstock. In 1971, Veruschka was one of twenty-four West German women to appear in Stern news magazine as part of a women’s campaign. Each publicly admitted to having had an abortion, which, at the time, was against the law. The campaign helped influence the formation of feminist groups at home and abroad. At 71, Veruschka returned to the catwalk as part of London Fashion Week, as radiant as ever. 4. Jane Forth This supermodel was one of Andy Warhol’s “superstars,” part of an elite group of muses and socialites within the artist’s inner circle. She initially got her start as the receptionist at Warhol’s famous Factory, and at seventeen, she starred in the 1970 underground film Trash​. Joe Dallesandro, Jane Forth, Trash – 1970. Photo by Factory/Kobal/Shutterstock. “She was very, very pale with an unusual face that looked like a mixture of Greta Garbo and a moonchild,” the designer Diane Von Furstenberg would write decades later. “She’d plucked off the ends of each of her eyebrows, which gave her a startled, almost comic expression.” Jane Forth, Joe Dallesandro, Trash – 1970. Photo by Factory/Kobal/Shutterstock. Life magazine described her as “new ‘now’ face.” Here she is at a 1972 party thrown by the photographer Francesco Scavullo in honor of another Warhol Superstar, Candy Darling: Jane Forth attending a party thrown by nightlife photographer Francesco Scavullo in honor of Andy Warhol superstar Candy Darling on February 16, 1972 in New York. Photo by Pierre Schermann/Penske Media/Shutterstock. 5. Marisa Berenson Named “the girl of the Seventies” by Yves St. Laurent, this supermodel worked with industry giants like Diana Vreeland, Halston, Azzedine Alaïa, Helmut Newton, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, and Steven Meisel. Vreeland is rumored to have discovered Berenson at the age of sixteen, but perhaps her entrance into the world of fashion began long before then. As the granddaughter of the designer Elsa Schiaparelli, she’d had her ​christening photo​ published in ​Vogue. Gene Kelly had taught her and her sister Barry, who grew up to be a photographer, how to dance. Salvador Dali had asked to paint her as a child. Marisa Berenson being interviewed. Photo by Peter Simins/Penske Media/Shutterstock. Of course, in addition to modeling, Berenson also built a career in acting, earning critical acclaim for her 1972 performance in ​Cabaret​ and working with the director Stanley Kubrick in 1975’s Barry Lyndon. Here she is wearing Valentino at her 1976 wedding to James Randall. The event, hosted at Randall’s house, drew 800 guests, inspiring the columnist Rona Barrett to proclaim, “Romance is back!” The scene during the wedding of Marisa Berenson and Jim Randall at Randall’s Beverly Hills house, made to look like the set of Lost Horizon. The affair cost $200,000 on November 21, 1976 in Los Angeles, California. Photo by Frank Diernhammer/Penske Media/Shutterstock. This photo of Berenstein with Warhol is from the same party Forth attended in 1972 (above): Marisa Berenson and Andy Warhol attending a party thrown by photographer Francesco Scavullo in honor of Warhol’s superstar Candy Darling. Photo by Pierre Scherman/Penske Media/Shutterstock. 6. Rei Kawakubo This legendary Japanese designer founded Comme des Garçons in 1973 in the heyday of punk. Throughout the next few decades, her brand would change fashion forever, and she’s continued to reference the punk movement from time to time. Kawakubo rarely gives interviews, allowing her avant-garde work to speak for itself. “I never intended to start a revolution,” she once ​admitted​ in conversation with ​The New Yorker. “I only came to Paris [in 1981] with the intention of showing what I thought was strong and beautiful. It just so happened that my notion was different from everybody else’s.” She was honored by a major exhibition at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2017. “From the very beginning, her search was always to look for something new,” Adrian Joffe, Kawakubo’s husband and the CEO of Comme des Garçons, told ​Vogue​ that year. 7. Grace Jones Grace Jones. Opening Night at Studio 54, New York. Photo by Nick Machalaba/Penske Media/Shutterstock. “Supermodel” is just one word to describe this genre-bending icon. Here are some more: singer, songwriter, actress, disco queen, Studio 54 regular, Bond girl, or, as the writer Jeff Gordinier once ​put it​, “high priestess of the outré.” In truth, modeling was just the beginning of a long and storied career, but it was an important chapter nevertheless. Model Grace Jones wearing a black gown with side-slit aboard The Peking for Yves Saint Laurent’s Opium Party. Photo by Tony Palmieri/Shutterstock. In 1970, Jones moved from New York to Paris, where she made a name for herself by modeling for the likes of Yves St. Laurent, Kenzo, and Azzedine Alaïa, and partying with Karl Lagerfeld and Giorgio Armani. Grace Jones attends the re-opening celebration of the remodeled disco palace Studio 54. Photo by Dustin Pittman/Penske Media/Shutterstock. She’s since gone through many evolutions, but she remains as enigmatic as ever. In 2017, as Jones worked on her 11th studio album, ​The Guardian​ asked her to define “old age.” She responded, “Oh God, I never use those words. Time is like a space capsule…We are in space, not time.” 8. Halston and the Halstonettes Halston Spring 1978 Ready to Wear Advance, New York. Photo by Fairchild Archive/Shutterstock. In many ways, the 1970s belonged to this American fashion designer and his crew of glamorous models, often called the Halstonettes: Karen Bjornson, Pat Cleveland, Anjelica Huston, and their contemporaries. Model Karen Bjornson. 96-piece collection; Includes a group of rainwear from his Halston III division; introduction of Ultrasuede. Model Pat Cleveland, 7 Jun 1973. Photo by Fairchild Archive/Shutterstock. “When Halston went to a party or a restaurant, he liked to travel with an entourage,” Bjornson told​ ​The New York Times​ decades later. “It wasn’t that he was shy, though he certainly had his dark glasses and cigarettes to shield him. Anyway, I never saw him as shy. I saw him as powerful, bigger than life.” Model Pat Cleveland. Halston Resort 1979 Ready to Wear Runway. Photo by Fairchild Archive/Shutterstock. Halston was catapulted onto the national stage back in 1961, when he designed the pillbox hat worn by Jackie Kennedy during the Presidential inauguration. Later, he too became a fixture of Studio 54, where he continued to take his signature minimalist aesthetic to new heights. Model Anjelica Huston. Halston Originals Fall 1972 Ready to Wear Collection Runway. Photo by Fairchild Archive/Shutterstock. Want more modern history in images? Check out these photo tours: A Look at Ralph Lauren’s 50 Years of Unforgettable Fashion 10 Facts About Legendary Fashion Designer Yves Saint Laurent Documenting LGBTQ Rights with Kay Tobin Lahusen and Barbara Gittings 7 Women of Color Who Revolutionized Fashion in the 1960s-70s 10 Pop Music Icons Photographed by Dezo Hoffmann
22 Jul 19
ONLINE ARTICLES

[ad_1] Liverpool players will surely be wondering what more they can do when they attempt to improve upon their last campaign in 2019-20. Jurgen Klopp’s job involves rallying his squad to go again after a season that saw them miss out on Premier League glory despite amassing a remarkable 97 points and that unenviable task […]

22 Jul 19
Palm Beach Multicultural Business News

The IAB, the national trade association for the digital media and marketing industries, released “Disrupting Brand Preference,” a study that shows that disruptor brand shoppers comprise 48 percent of all U.S consumers. They are younger than incumbent brand-only shoppers, with 84 percent under 54 years old, and are likelier to have a household income of […]

22 Jul 19
The Inquiring Mind

Wikipedia The Brothers is a British television series, produced and shown by the BBC between 1972 and 1976. Debuting with the death of road haulage magnate Robert Hammond, the series followed the trials and tribulations of the company and family/families he left behind, with equal shares in Hammond Transport Services left to each of his […]

22 Jul 19
WIAT
Birmingham, Ala.- The city of Birmingham is just days away from the inaugural event of Freedom Fest 2019. Freedom Fest 2019 is a new music and empowerment festival for the city of Birmingham.  The scheduled musical guest list includes 8 Ball & MJG, Love Moor, Midnight Star and Musiq.  Other scheduled artists include Birmingham Native Ruben Studdard and Alvin Garrett.  Gates are scheduled to open at 10 a.m. The show begins at Noon at Kelly Ingram Park. Organizers say Freedom Fest is more than just a music festival. It is also an empowerment event. There are several speakers expected to address issues like urban planning and design. The South got something to say, the power of STEM and women’s right. Also scheduled to speak is U.S. Senator Doug Jones. He will be speaking at 16th Street Baptist. He will be on the same panel with Mayor Randall Woodfin and criminal justice reform advocate Anthony Ray Hinton. To see the list of events, ticket information and more, www.freedomfestbhm.com. Freedom Fest will be enforcing a clear bag policy.
22 Jul 19
Together Let's Promote Horror

From the wilds of deepest Buckinghamshire, Oli Jacobs has been self-publishing his esoteric brand of writing since 2012 to moderate acknowledgement. With his fingers more likely tapping out a mix of Comedy and Horror, he is constantly percolating ideas within his Escher-like brain. When not writing, he can be found staring into the void and […]

22 Jul 19
New Delhi Times

A series of Islamic State (IS) announcements of new provinces it controls in recent weeks has renewed debate over the group’s possible resurgence after its self-proclaimed caliphate fell, with some analysts warning an increasingly decentralized IS could recover and spread its tentacles to other parts of the world. During his first appearance last April after […]

22 Jul 19
Christine R

These kangaroos were daily visitors to the Rocklands Reservoir caravan park. There was a mother kangaroo – it was our final day before I got a snap of her joey – and the ‘roos with her were all different sizes, like they were her past babies. Thanks for looking. 🙂