Raptors Trade

24 May 19
Lake News

With the NBA free agency period now just over a month a way, LeBron seems to have wasted no time with his recruiting. The season has yet to come to a close, but there are already various reports of James reaching out to the best free agents about to hit the open market. As the […]

24 May 19
Sport Archives

Kyle Lowry has been played by superstar small forward Kawhi Leonard sang, john, kurie, kulhi Leonard sang, kurie, kurie, kulhi Leonard all swingman play. Finals on Thursday against the Milwaukee Bucks, finishing with 35 points to lead the Raptors to a huge road win. Finals for the first time in franchise history. All-Star carries himself […]

24 May 19
Sherman County eNews

CONTENTS Fire Ban at Cottonwood Canyon State Park Chuck Wallace, Grand Marshal for Wasco Memorial Day Celebration  142nd Fighter Wing to conduct Memorial Day Flyovers Memorial Day Reminds Us of Our Highest Ideals – and the Price We Must Sometimes Pay for Them Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do Oregon Capital Insider Index: This […]

24 May 19
nature photo tips

Birds in flight (BIF)make interesting and beautiful images. Capturing them can be difficult but made easier with the right equipment and camera settings. It is an interplay between available light, ISO, F/Stop and Shutter Speed. One should also be investing in a good telephoto lens that has great autofocus. Invest your money in the lens […]

24 May 19
Team Canada - Official Olympic Team Website

With the rise of the Toronto Raptors in the NBA Playoffs, Canada’s only NBA franchise is inching one step closer to the NBA Finals. After a thrilling Game 5 victory Thursday night over Milwaukee, there is no better time to breakdown the differences between NBA and FIBA rules. While you may think you know the […]

24 May 19
Heavy.com

The Golden State Warriors are feeling the disrespect after not being listed as the favorite to win the NBA Finals by popular projections site FiveThirtyEight.

24 May 19
OILERSNATION
For years we have read or heard the phrase, “sports is my escape from the real world.” For many sports fans watching it, reading about it, writing about it or listening to sports talk radio is a nice reprieve from the office or life in general. It still is that way for many people, and it should be. Being a fan is supposed to be fun, but sometimes it can be equally frustrating depending on the direction of the team you cheer for. However, I believe we can’t completely separate sports from the real world anymore. Sports is one of the few things that unites people from all walks of life. If you are an Edmonton Oilers fan it doesn’t matter what your job is, your ethnicity or your gender. You all cheer together. Look at the diversity of fans who congregate at Jurassic Park for a Toronto Raptors playoff game. Watch them erupt in joyous unison after a clutch shot. While racism still exists in our society, sporting events often show people of different colour hugging, smiling and enjoying the journey together. It is wonderful. However, sports, and how they are covered has opened up opportunities where real life and sports need to intersect. One of those examples is former NHL defenceman Vyacheslav Voynov. Yesterday arbitrator Shyam Das upheld NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman’s decision that Voynov should be suspended for the equivalent of one NHL season, but Das found Voynov should be credited with having already served 41 games of the suspension last season. So Voynov will be eligible to return midway through next season. The Los Angeles Kings own his rights and sent out a press release soon after Das’ ruling was announced. “Today the NHL arbitrator rendered a final decision on further discipline to Slava Voynov. From our perspective, the player will not be playing for the Kings. We will now determine the impact of the arbitrator’s decision on our rights to the player and consider our options going forward.” Voynov won’t be playing for the Kings, but will another NHL team acquire his rights and sign him to an NHL contract? Before we discuss that, let’s look at the situation that led to Voynov being suspended by the NHL in 2014 for domestic abuse. Voynov spent almost two months in jail after pleading no contest to corporal injury against a spouse. Upon his release from jail he was taken into custody by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, but rather than attend immigration proceedings he elected to return to Russia. He played three seasons for the KHL’s St. Petersburg’s SKA. Last year he didn’t play anywhere as he sat out his suspension. Reading he plead no contest and went to jail is one thing. Reading what he did to get put in jail is much different. Katie Strang outlined the viciousness of Voynov’s attack on his then-girlfriend, now wife, Marta Varlamov in an outstanding article for the Athletic last June. You can read the entire piece here. I urge you to read it. It is wonderful journalism, but also heart-breakingly painful to read how awful one human could treat another. A few lines really stood out to me. “A statement included within that report states that, while attending a team Halloween party, the two began arguing, during which Voynov removed [Varlamova’s] costume glasses and stomped on them in front of the guests. When they continued arguing outside the venue, Voynov “punched her in the left jaw with a closed fist.” Strang continued to outline what the police report said. The two returned home and their argument continued. “Voynov wrapped both of his hands around Ms. Varlamova’s neck and began to squeeze, making it difficult for her to breathe.” Voynov, according to the motion, “continued to choke her while repeatedly pushing her to the floor of the bedroom,” telling her to “get out,” that there would be “no more money for her,” and that she would be “gone.” According to the motion, Voynov then “kicked her five or six times all over her body” and when she attempted to stand he “pushed her down directly into the bottom corner of the flat screen television that was mounted to the bedroom wall.” Varlamova sustained “a head laceration that resulted in severe bleeding” and throughout all of this “she repeatedly screamed for him to stop.” Strang obtained 911 transcripts of a call from a neighbour worried about a women screaming and not being treated well. I encourage you read the entire story. ABUSE… Even in 2019 when we are a bit more open to discuss domestic or sexual abuse than previous generations, when you read the details of what Voynov did it is much worse than the picture most of us have in our minds when we think what abuse looks like. I believe if you’ve never beaten your child or spouse (man or woman), or been a victim of abuse, it is hard to truly imagine what abuse really looks like. It is demeaning. It is dangerous. It is ugly. And it is fucking deplorable. But sadly, it still occurs far too often. Children are abused. Women are abused. Men are abused. The elderly are abused. No group is immune to it. While men are still more likely to be the abuser, there are many cases of women abusing their partners or spouses. If we never discuss it, I doubt it will diminish. It is an uncomfortable discussion and there are many aspects to consider. Voynov’s case is in the spotlight, and NHL fans can’t just ignore it. Some don’t want to talk about it. Some feel it isn’t their business, that it is between Voynov and his wife. I respect that, but I think it is worthy of discussion. If we want change in society, then we have to discuss uncomfortable things. Reading what Voynov did to Varlamova made me sick. I can’t imagine punching someone you love in the face. Or choking them, or kicking them repeatedly. And the scary thing is it wasn’t the first time. He not only felt it was okay to physically abuse her, he felt it was okay to do it repeatedly according to witness testimony. But Voynov is far the only abuser in the sporting world. The statistics tell us there are likely abusers among fans, bloggers, media, players, and NHL staff. We don’t want to think about it, but we shouldn’t pretend those people don’t exist. It is an epidemic in society that needs to stop, and if the sporting world has to be the leader, then so be it. We should welcome the responsibility. WHAT NOW? The Los Angeles Kings said they will not sign Voynov. Will another team trade for his rights this summer? Yesterday on Twitter I asked people a trio of questions. Has Voynov been punished enough for abuse? Does he deserve a second chance? Would you be okay if your NHL team signed him? The results had no middle ground. You either thought yes, he deserves a second chance, or you were adamant no NHL team should sign him. I believe in second chances, but the person has to show remorse, and also prove they have changed. How much therapy has he done? Did he go with his wife? Has he spoke publicly about what he learned and how he has changed. For me, it couldn’t just be a blind “he deserves a second chance.” If a team signs him they better have a good PR plan of how this will work, because there will be a backlash, and rightfully so. Voynov hasn’t played in the NHL for essentially five seasons. He played six games in 2014/2015, before the aforementioned attack occurred. But after he spent almost two months in jail, he has worked. He was employed by the KHL. He was given a second chance and he made a good living doing so. Does the NHL owe him a second chance? If I was a owner of an NHL team I would not sign him. It is my business and as a business owner you have the right to choose who you employ. It would send a strong message to your staff, players and fans that you don’t condone abuse. Companies outside the sporting world do this. They have a code of conduct, and if you don’t adhere to it, you won’t work there anymore. Why can’t NHL teams have the same? They should simply take a stand and say we won’t employ people who abuse their spouse or children. If you choose to abuse someone to the despicable level that Voynov did then you won’t be employed by our team any longer or in the future. It is very straightforward. And this isn’t about past cases. What happened in the past is irrelevant to me. I don’t care what discipline the NHL handed out in the 1980s, 1990s or even in 2010 Just like the rules have changed and evolved on the ice, it is time the NHL evolves and changes off of the ice. I don’t believe in 2019 we should say, “stick to sports.” Professional sports are one of the most followed activities in the world. People of all ages, races and walks of life follow it closely. If the NHL takes a hard stand against domestic abuse, maybe it will make someone think twice about abusing someone in the future. Maybe it won’t stop them, but at least the NHL will have created a new code of conduct. I hope Voynov and his family find forgiveness for each other. I have a lot of empathy for his family and I hope he has stopped abusing his wife. But I wouldn’t have him on my team. I wonder how many owners and GMs will feel the same? Recently by Jason Gregor: One-on-One with Ken Holland Scouting Dmitri Samorukov The FAN Within What Happened to Corey Graham? A Winning Culture Holland’s Actions will Speak Louder than His Words
24 May 19
Full Press Coverage

We are now less than a month away from the 2019 NBA Draft. With the NBA Combine out of the way, the time is ripe to start exploring the draft itself. Here we are folks, its time for my NBA Mock Draft 1.1. This draft is wide open and exciting after the first two picks. […]

24 May 19
Cassius | born unapologetic | News, Style, Culture

The Lakers stink and have some serious work to do if they ever want to get back to their winning ways. If they intend on returning back to NBA prominence, they are going to need some superstars, and according to LeBron whisperer Brian Windhorst, James is on the job and is “in contact” with Kawhi […]

24 May 19
NESN.com

[nesn_embed service=dailymotion src=”https://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/x78emjt” width=”480″ height=”270″] Will the Boston Celtics’ cautious pursuit of Kawhai Leonard prove to be a historic mistake? Some NBA observers believe that’s the case after the Celtics’ disappointing regular season gave way to a second-round elimination from the NBA playoffs, while Leonard and the Toronto Raptors are one win over the Milwaukee […]

24 May 19
The Undefeated
TORONTO — Toronto Raptors team president Masai Ujiri takes pains to keep himself out of the limelight. This was an easy task a decade ago when Ujiri was early in his career as a globe-trotting scout and aspiring front-office executive. Today, Ujiri, 48, has become one of the shrewdest front-office minds in the business of basketball, one known for fearless, forward-thinking moves and blockbuster trades. In 2010, Ujiri became the first African-born general manager in the NBA when he was hired to run the Denver Nuggets’ basketball operations department. When we first met in 2011, Ujiri, then the vice president of basketball operation for the Nuggets, had orchestrated a blockbuster 12-player trade that sent Carmelo Anthony to New York in exchange for a group of promising young players. [boxout id=”166954″] Today, Raptors fans are enjoying the fruits of another bold Ujiri trade that sent fan favorite DeMar DeRozan to San Antonio in exchange for San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard. It’s generally accepted in Toronto that the Raptors would not be one victory from the franchise’s first NBA Finals appearance had Ujiri not made the trade. He made clear earlier this week that he wasn’t going to discuss any of that. During a brief conversation in his office at the Raptors’ training complex, Ujiri said this Raptors playoff run was about the players, not him, and he was going to keep it that way. What Ujiri will talk about is Africa, specifically the dramatic, widening impact of Africa in the NBA. As the NBA continues to expand its borders, the road from Africa to the United States has become a well-paved superhighway, thanks in large part to people such as Ujiri and Amadou Fall, the godfather of African basketball. This has been the good news of the current NBA season and a point of pride for Ujiri. “I’m proud of where the game is going and the impact it’s having on the continent,” Ujiri said before Game 5 between Toronto and Milwaukee. “African players continue to grow and perform on the big stage. The NBA has taken huge steps to make progress on the continent.” Beginning in 2003, when he hosted his first camp in Nigeria, Ujiri has played a pivotal role in inspiring young Africans in Nigeria and beyond to use basketball as a catapult to achieving great things. While players such as Serge Ibaka from the Republic of Congo and Pascal Siakam and Joel Embiid from Cameroon have become well-known stars, thousands of young African men and women you won’t see in big-time college programs or in the NBA have traveled the road Ujiri helped pave. They attend U.S. prep schools, community colleges and universities. They work in jobs within and around the massive sports industry, not necessarily on the court. Ujiri preaches to aspiring young players the importance of using the game to create opportunities, and not letting the game use them. “We have to give the youth a chance,” he said, “and that’s by building infrastructure, facilities and improving the coaching.” As much as building the Raptors into a championship team is a goal for Ujiri, facilitating opportunity for young Africans has become his life’s mission and passion. Fall, the NBA Africa vice president and managing director for Africa, said Ujiri is a living example of using the game. “You can be in the NBA in other ways, and I think Masai in the NBA is the biggest of all those,” Fall said from his office in Johannesburg. “He is running one of the best franchises in the league and coming back every summer to give back, inspiring the next generation.” Fall added, “The stage and the platform Masai has is so special. I’m proud that he’s really doing his absolute best to give back and to grow the game, and to contribute to the efforts to grow Africa beyond just basketball.” A journey across three continents Ujiri’s journey from Africa to the executive suite has been well-documented but bears repeating, for it underlines two of the major themes of his life: the dream and the journey. He was born in Bournemouth, England, where his parents were studying. His mother is a doctor; his father worked as a nurse. The family moved back to Nigeria when Masai was 2. By age 13, he had abandoned soccer and fallen in love with basketball. When it was time for high school, his parents allowed him to come to the United States to pursue his dream of playing college basketball. He left Nigeria for Seattle to play at a prep school while staying with a Nigerian family. His vision was to play in college and compete with a team in one of Europe’s top leagues. After prep school, Ujiri enrolled in a junior college, Bismarck State College in North Dakota. After community college, he signed with Montana State in Billings but stayed less than a year. He left Montana and returned to England to begin what he hoped would be a fruitful pro career. It was not. He played in Derby County in England for a year, then for a second-division team in Belgium and a team in Germany, followed by another stint in England, then back to Belgium, Finland for three months, then Denmark. It was in Denmark that Ujiri, then 32, took stock of his pursuit of the dream. He realized, “At some point, I started chasing this thing that is not there anymore.” The experience would serve him well as a front-office executive who would have to make tough decisions, telling players things they didn’t want to hear and making trades that benefited the franchise and not necessarily the player. After the experience in Denmark, Ujiri jettisoned the dream of playing for a team and began focusing on running a team. That put him on a whole other journey. He worked as an unpaid scout for the Orlando Magic. Finally in 2003, Kiki VanDeWeghe hired him as an international scout for the Denver Nuggets. He was later promoted to the Nuggets’ director of international scouting. Ujiri got his NBA front-office start in Toronto in 2007, when he joined the Raptors as director of global scouting. He was promoted to assistant general manager, player personnel, in 2008. Then it was back to Denver, where he spent three seasons as executive vice president of basketball operations for the Nuggets. In May 2013, Ujiri was named president and general manager, basketball operations, of the Raptors. Ujiri’s tenacious pursuit of his dream is instructive. Too often, well-meaning adults tell young people who aspire to be a professional athlete that the odds are stacked against them. We tell them about the one-in-a-million odds against them. Ujiri’s approach is: “Somebody has to be that one in a million. It might as well be you. And here’s how.” He said, “You have to keep growing, keep striving and keep pounding away to get to the level you want to reach.” The evolution of players, especially from sub-Saharan Africa, has been amazing to watch, from Dikembe Mutombo and Hakeem Olajuwon to players such as Ibaka and Siakam. Former NBA center Dikembe Mutombo (left) and Toronto Raptors general manager Masai Ujiri (right) participate in the NBA Cares All-Star Day of Service as part of 2016 All-Star Weekend at NBA Centre Court of the Enercare Centre in Toronto on Feb. 12, 2016. Olajuwon and Mutombo stumbled into basketball. Mutombo initially played intramural basketball at Georgetown. Olajuwon was a soccer goalie when he was introduced to basketball. Subsequent generations of players from the continent have been the beneficiaries of expanded programs and infrastructure. The NBA sponsors the NBA Academy Africa, based in Senegal, designed to identify talent and nurture it on the continent. A professional league, Basketball Africa, is scheduled to begin in January. “The impact has been great,” Siakam said earlier this week. ”What Joel Embiid has done, what I’ve done, just in terms of putting Africa on the map in the United States during these conference finals. “The more kids who can see us, the better,” he said. “Now they can believe.” The exploits of Embiid, Siakam, Ibaka and so many others have been a source of inspiration. “We’re going in the right direction,” Siakam said. Echoing Ujiri’s often-stated line, Siakam pointed out that the goal is not simply to create a pipeline that produces basketball players. “It’s beyond basketball,” he said. “It’s about creating and producing leaders on our continent.” Thanks to social media and the internet, role models and paths to possibilities are far more abundant that they were when Ujiri began his journey and scores more abundant than when Olajuwon and Mutombo began theirs. Said Fall: “These aspirational young players can follow the NBA through an authentic African lens because they’re seeing young people who come from their community who are given opportunities and move forward with those opportunities.” Ujiri wants to lead Toronto to its first NBA title, and he wants the African presence to continue to grow. “I want to win,” he said. “I want to build pathways from young kids in Africa. I want that continent to grow. I want people to see there is hope, there is a dream. “I’m the example of the dream.”
24 May 19
Archy news nety

Photo: bleacherreport.com Lakers targeting Beal, Lowry and Favors in potential trades There is no question that the Los Angeles Lakers will be the pressurized team to deliver some goods in the coming postseason. Since LeBron James missed the playoffs for the first time since the 2004-05 season, the Lakers can not afford to create another […]

24 May 19
High Velocity Sport

LeBron James capped the first round of the NBA playoffs with a single, poignant emoji: a watch. He closed the second round with an emphatic declaration: “Never underestimate the heart of a champion!” Along the way, James smacked the analytics movement, saluted John Singleton and shouted out Muhammad Ali while his team generated an endless stream of intrigue and controversy. All told, it’s been a […]