Remembering President George W. Bush

22 Jan 19
Russia News Now

________HaaretzInfamous Private Paramilitary Firm Blackwater Planning Comeback. First Stop: Syria The controversial security contractor Blackwater is back in the headlines now that its founder – billionaire and former Navy SEAL Erik Prince – has made the case that the United States should replace its small footprint of 2,000 troops in Syria with mercenaries. Prince’s pitch […]

21 Jan 19
ThinkProgress
President Donald Trump — who built his political career on the false claim that the nation’s first African-American president was born in Kenya and launched his presidential campaign by smearing immigrants — marked Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a two-minute visit to the civil-rights icon’s memorial. Trump on Monday was joined by Vice President Mike Pence and David Bernhardt, acting secretary of the Interior, as he laid a wreath at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The entire trip, including the motorcade, took about fifteen minutes. The unscheduled visit came after a tweet earlier that day, in which Trump wrote, “Today we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for standing up for the self-evident truth Americans hold so dear, that no matter what the color of our skin or the place of our birth, we are all created equal by God.” Today we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for standing up for the self-evident truth Americans hold so dear, that no matter what the color of our skin or the place of our birth, we are all created equal by God. #MLKDay https://t.co/pEaVpCB8M4 — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 21, 2019 Reacting to Trump’s tweet, Gary Orfield, co-director of The Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles, told ThinkProgress: “Trump often tries to spin reality, but his tweet suggesting he affirms the ideals of Martin Luther King is truly incredible. “He was elected in a racist campaign,” Orfield said, “and his administration has attacked civil rights in appointments, in regulation changes, in attacking affirmative action, in creating unspeakable conditions for refugee families, and turning the Supreme Court to the hard right. Orfield said Trump’s statements and policies “have unleashed the demons of racial hate and encouraged white nationalists.” “I was in the original March on Washington,” he said. “Those who believe in Dr. King’s vision of the ‘beloved community’ should be marching now because this administration is the most hostile we’ve experienced in a century.” After years of advocating for his racist “birther” conspiracy, Trump announced his presidential candidacy in 2015 by declaring that Mexico was not “sending its best” to immigrate to the U.S. “They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists,” he said at the time. “Some, I assume, are good people.” Throughout both his campaign and his presidency, Trump has repeatedly doubled down on racist and anti-immigrant statements. He repeatedly berated U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, who presided over two lawsuits into the failed Trump University, and claimed he was biased due to his ethnicity. “I think it has to do with, perhaps, the fact that I’m very, very strong on the border — very, very strong on the border,” Trump told Fox News in February 2017. “He has been extremely hostile to me. Now, he is Hispanic, I believe.” During his campaign, Trump marketed himself to African-American voters by asking, “What do you have to lose?” As president, he declared that there were some “very fine people” among the white nationalist protesters at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, and referred to Haiti, El Salvador and several African nations as “shithole countries.” https://thinkprogress.org/two-years-after-trump-asked-black-voters-what-they-have-to-lose-the-verdict-is-in-plenty/ In his defense of the border wall — a key campaign promise — Trump has repeatedly derided immigrants. Prior to the 2018 midterm elections, he released an ad claiming that convicted cop-killer Luis Bracamontes had illegally entered the country under the Democrats’ watch, when in reality he had entered in 2002 when George W. Bush was president. His repeated focus on how “illegal immigrants” are committing more crimes is also false. The libertarian Cato Institute has found that immigrants commit crime at a disproportionately lower rate than naturalized citizens. Meanwhile, the partial government shutdown — now the longest in U.S. history — has disproportionately impacted African Americans. As the Guardian noted, African Americans make up 12 percent of the U.S. population, but 18 percent of the federal workforce. The shutdown is also centered around a border wall, which, as ThinkProgress has previously noted, would do little to combat smuggling and only serve as red meat to Trump’s base. “Donald Trump’s actions are shattering the ‘beloved community’ that Dr. King dreamed for our nation. If Trump and his administration truly wanted to honor the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., they would stop their ongoing assault on our civil and human rights,” Vanita Gupta, president and chief executive of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, told ThinkProgress. The irony, however, of presiding over all of this while simultaneously attempting to honor King was apparently lost on both Trump and Pence. In an interview with Fox News Sunday, Pence went so far as to liken Trump to King. “[This] weekend we are remembering the life and the work of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.,” Pence said. “He inspired us to change through the legislative process, to become a more perfect union…that’s exactly what President Trump is calling on the Congress to do, come to the table in a spirit of good faith.” The NAACP labeled the interview “an insult to Dr. King’s legacy.” King’s son, Martin Luther King III, hit back. “The vice president attempted to compare the president to Martin Luther King, Jr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a bridge builder, not a wall builder,” his son said. “Martin Luther King, Jr. would say, ‘Love, not hate, will make America great.'”
14 Jan 19
Radio Free

I remember the start of the Iraq War as a moment now. Was it ever anything else? The night when the cruise missiles were delivered to us by way of a government feed, grainy ribbons of light cut into a foreign sky. This was, I suppose, its intended purpose: the birth of an “awesome” moment […]

10 Jan 19
Intel Today

“With what is happening in the U.S. and the possible instability that is going to come in U.S. policy you needed a voice of reason and pragmatism that had some heft to it. He was that voice. Losing that voice is going to make it more likely that any mishap or miscalculation by the Trump […]

09 Jan 19
Bug Woman - Adventures in London

Dear Readers, it is strange how suddenly I am brought up short by remembering. Today, as I was mooching home from Muswell Hill, looking for a Wednesday Weed,  I inhaled a breath of lemony sweetness from this rather bedraggled-looking shrub. Instantly, I was transported to another place and time: my father, walking around the garden […]

08 Jan 19
Cougar Chronicle

Gwyndalynn Kent and Ashley Wolf George H. W. Bush was America’s 41st president as well as a loving father to his six children. George has done so much to help make the place we call home, incredible which is why instead of treating his death as a tragedy, he needs to be remembered for what […]

01 Jan 19
The Sun
IN 2018 the world has been forced to bid a sad farewell to some of its most famous and beloved stars from the world of sports, entertainment and television. Here we take an opportunity to honour some of the iconic figures who are no longer with us…   January Bella Emberg, 80 Comedy actress best known for TV partnership with Russ Abbot in the 1980s, especially for her spoof character Blunder Woman Mark E. Smith, 60 Founded post-punk group The Fall and was the only original member of the constantly changing line-up in its 42-year history Dolores O’Riordan, 46 Cranberries lead singer and judge on Irish version of The Voice ­accidentally drowned in a bath due to sedation by alcohol Jimmy Armfield, 82 Blackpool and England football hero and later BBC pundit who won 42 caps for England and was in the winning 1966 World Cup squad Ingvar Kamprad, 91 As founder of Ikea, the  Swedish magnate revolutionised the way the world lives, introducing us to flat-pack furniture and Swedish meatballs Simon Shelton, 52 Actor who played Teletubby Tinky Winky from 1997 to 2001, a role he likened to being in The Beatles. He died of hypothermia Cyrille Regis, 59 England striker who was a ­pioneer for black footballers. Clubs included West Brom, Coventry City and Aston Villa in his 19-year career February John Mahoney, 77 Actor who played Martin Crane in ­TV’s Frasier. Born in Blackpool, he edited a medical journal before becoming an actor in his thirties Billy Graham, 99 US evangelist was among world’s most influential preachers. Gave spiritual counselling to every US President from Truman to Obama Emma Chambers, 53 British TV and film actress was best known for her role as Alice in the long-running sitcom The Vicar Of Dibley, and the film Notting Hill March Ken Dodd, 90 The veteran Liverpudlian comic was instantly recognisable by his wild hair and big front teeth. Was knighted in the 2017 New Year Honours and was given a funeral fit for showbiz royalty, with mourners waving tickling sticks Hubert de Givenchy, 91 French designer who founded fashion firm in 1952 and styled Jackie Kennedy and Audrey Hepburn Jim Bowen, 89 Hosted TV darts show Bullseye for 14 years, with catchphrases ‘Here’s what you could’ve won,’ and ‘Super, smashing, great’ Roger Bannister, 88 Athletics legend who ran world’s first sub-four-minute mile in Oxford on May 6, 1954. Later a distinguished neurologist Stephen Hawking, 76 Physicist who had same Cambridge University post once held by Sir Isaac Newton. Wrote 1988 best-seller A Brief History Of Time Bill Maynard, 89 Actor best known as rogue Claude Greengrass in ITV’s Heartbeat. Also unsuccessfully ran against Tony Benn in a 1984 by-election April Ray Wilkins, 61 Footie hero began career at Chelsea, where he was captain at 18. Lifted FA Cup with Man Utd and won 84 caps for England Eric Bristow, 60 Hugely popular darts ace known as the Crafty Cockney. Was five times world champ in an astounding pro career before retiring in 2007 Winnie Mandela, 81 The anti-apartheid activist was married to former South African President Nelson Mandela for 38 years, including his 27 years in jail Michael Anderson, 98 Film director was best known for The Dam Busters and Around The World In 80 Days – for which he wrangled more than 68,000 extras Verne Troyer, 49 The 2ft 8in actor was best known as Mini- Me in Austin Powers films. Began his film career in 1994 playing the stunt double for a baby Avicii, 28 Swedish DJ, real name Tim Bergling, began at 16 posting remixes online. Grammy nominated for 2012 hit Sunshine with David Guetta Dale Winton, 62 Presenter of TV game shows including Supermarket Sweep and Pets Win Prizes. Died of natural causes after years of health problems May Jlloyd Samuel, 37 Footie star moved to Britain from his native Trinidad and Tobago and played for Aston Villa and Bolton Wanderers. Died in a car crash Tom Wolfe, 87 Journalist and author best known for 1987 novel The Bonfire Of The Vanities, which became a film. Also known for his white suit Margot Kidder, 69 Canadian actress best known for her feisty, funny Lois Lane to Christopher Reeve’s Superman in 1978 film. Later a political activist Tessa Jowell, 70 Labour MP who helped to bring the Olympics to London and was beloved on all sides of politics. Fought to improve cancer treatment June Leslie Grantham, 71 Turned to acting after a jail term for the 1966 murder of a German cabbie – then became a big star as EastEnders’ ‘Dirty’ Den Watts Peter Stringfellow, 77 Went from tie salesman to king of a nightclub empire. His most famous club in central London was named after himself Kate Spade, 55 American handbag designer whose stylish products were a Nineties sensation, even being name-checked on telly hit Sex And The City Joe Jackson, 89 Dad to and manager of the Jackson 5, who once admitted he whipped son Michael with a belt but insisted he “never beat him” July Ellie Soutter, 18 Talented Team GB snowboarder who was tipped to star at the 2022 Winter Olympics. Took her own life on her 18th birthday Peter Firmin, 89 Puppet maker who, along with Oliver Postgate, created The Clangers and other kids’ classics such as Ivor The Engine and Bagpuss Lord Carrington, 99 Tory politician quit as PM Margaret Thatcher’s Foreign Secretary in 1982 for failing to predict the Argentine invasion of the Falklands August Kofi Annan, 80 UN Secretary-General from 1997 to 2006. The Ghanian won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001 for his work championing human rights Barry Chuckle, 73 Actor and half of kids’ comic duo the Chuckle Brothers. He kept his bone cancer secret – even from his family – for two years Neil Simon, 91 American playwright was the Broadway master of comedy whose hits included Barefoot In The Park and The Odd Couple August Fenella Fielding, 90 Husky-voiced Carry On actress once considered suicide by gorging on spaghetti. Had two lovers on the go for 20 years Burt Reynolds, 82 Smokey And The Bandit heart-throb was a Seventies and Eighties film icon. Was nominated for an Oscar for 1997 film Boogie Nights Rachel Bland, 40 Presenter inspired listeners with her podcast You, Me And The Big C about two-year breast cancer battle. Also wrote award-winning blog Aretha Franklin, 76 Legendary singer dubbed the Queen Of Soul, famous for hits such as I Say A Little Prayer and Respect. Sold 75million records over 60-year career September Denis Norden, 96 Wrote first comedy script for the BBC aged 19, leading to 60-year radio and TV career. Best known as host of It’ll Be Alright On The Night Geoffrey Hayes, 76 TV presenter fondly remembered by a generation of kids after fronting more than 1,000 episodes of Rainbow from 1973 to 1992 Chas Hodges, 74 Musician found fame in Seventies and Eighties as one half of Chas & Dave. Their Cockney-style songs included Rabbit and Snooker Loopy October Charles Aznavour, 74 Talented singer dubbed ‘France’s Sinatra’ whose biggest hit in English, 1974’s She, featured in movie Notting Hill Paul Allen, 65 US billionaire co- founded Microsoft with school pal Bill Gates and turned it into the world’s biggest software firm. He died of cancer Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, 60 Thai owner of Leicester City who led the club to Premier League title glory in 2016. Died in helicopter crash Babs Beverley, 91 As a singer in 1950s trio the Beverley Sisters she had hits including I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus and Little Drummer Boy Jean Trumpington, 96 A World War Two Bletchley Park code breaker, who as a Baroness famously gave a fellow peer a V-sign in the House of Lords in 2011 November Stan Lee, 95 The comic book legend helped create The X-Men, Iron Man and the Incredible Hulk. He had cameos in every Marvel film George Bush, 94 Ex-US President who lived longer than his 40 predecessors. In office from ’89 to ’93, including first Gulf War. Father of George W Bush Richard Baker, 93 BBC newsreader who presented the first TV news bulletin in 1954 and voiced animated children’s classic Mary, Mungo And Midge Andrew Burt, 73 Best known as the original Jack Sugden in Emmerdale, the actor went on to star in I’m Alan Partridge before training to be a counsellor [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN UK NEWS” posts_category=”0″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] December Peter Armitage, 78 Actor played Kevin Webster’s father Bill in Coronation Street and returned to the soap several times before finally leaving in 2011 Pete Shelley, 63 Fronted legendary Manchester punk pioneers The Buzzcocks. Died from suspected  heart attack in Estonia, where he lived Paddy Ashdown, 77 Former Royal Marine served as Lib Dem leader from 1988 to 1999. Died following a short battle with bladder cancer Wendy Beckett, 88 Nun found unlikely TV fame as an art critic in 1990s after she was overheard enthusing at an art exhibition by a BBC film crew June Whitfield, 93 Best known as the gran in Absolutely Fabulous, as well as in sitcom Terry And June and Carry On films [boxout headline=”Hell Corner” featured-image=”8094979″]Dennis Nilsen, 72, died May 12 Former civil servant killed at least 15 men and stashed remains under the floor of his North London home. Died in a maximum security prison. James ‘Whitey’ Bulger, 89, died October 30 Ex-Boston gangster evaded capture for 16 years before being caught in 2011 and convicted for 11 murders. Inspired 2015 Johnny Depp film Black Mass.[/boxout] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
01 Jan 19
The Scottish Sun
IN 2018 the world has been forced to bid a sad farewell to some of its most famous and beloved stars from the world of sports, entertainment and television. Here we take an opportunity to honour some of the iconic figures who are no longer with us…   January Bella Emberg, 80 Comedy actress best known for TV partnership with Russ Abbot in the 1980s, especially for her spoof character Blunder Woman Mark E. Smith, 60 Founded post-punk group The Fall and was the only original member of the constantly changing line-up in its 42-year history Dolores O’Riordan, 46 Cranberries lead singer and judge on Irish version of The Voice ­accidentally drowned in a bath due to sedation by alcohol Jimmy Armfield, 82 Blackpool and England football hero and later BBC pundit who won 42 caps for England and was in the winning 1966 World Cup squad Ingvar Kamprad, 91 As founder of Ikea, the  Swedish magnate revolutionised the way the world lives, introducing us to flat-pack furniture and Swedish meatballs Simon Shelton, 52 Actor who played Teletubby Tinky Winky from 1997 to 2001, a role he likened to being in The Beatles. He died of hypothermia Cyrille Regis, 59 England striker who was a ­pioneer for black footballers. Clubs included West Brom, Coventry City and Aston Villa in his 19-year career February John Mahoney, 77 Actor who played Martin Crane in ­TV’s Frasier. Born in Blackpool, he edited a medical journal before becoming an actor in his thirties Billy Graham, 99 US evangelist was among world’s most influential preachers. Gave spiritual counselling to every US President from Truman to Obama Emma Chambers, 53 British TV and film actress was best known for her role as Alice in the long-running sitcom The Vicar Of Dibley, and the film Notting Hill March Ken Dodd, 90 The veteran Liverpudlian comic was instantly recognisable by his wild hair and big front teeth. Was knighted in the 2017 New Year Honours and was given a funeral fit for showbiz royalty, with mourners waving tickling sticks Hubert de Givenchy, 91 French designer who founded fashion firm in 1952 and styled Jackie Kennedy and Audrey Hepburn Jim Bowen, 89 Hosted TV darts show Bullseye for 14 years, with catchphrases ‘Here’s what you could’ve won,’ and ‘Super, smashing, great’ Roger Bannister, 88 Athletics legend who ran world’s first sub-four-minute mile in Oxford on May 6, 1954. Later a distinguished neurologist Stephen Hawking, 76 Physicist who had same Cambridge University post once held by Sir Isaac Newton. Wrote 1988 best-seller A Brief History Of Time Bill Maynard, 89 Actor best known as rogue Claude Greengrass in ITV’s Heartbeat. Also unsuccessfully ran against Tony Benn in a 1984 by-election April Ray Wilkins, 61 Footie hero began career at Chelsea, where he was captain at 18. Lifted FA Cup with Man Utd and won 84 caps for England Eric Bristow, 60 Hugely popular darts ace known as the Crafty Cockney. Was five times world champ in an astounding pro career before retiring in 2007 Winnie Mandela, 81 The anti-apartheid activist was married to former South African President Nelson Mandela for 38 years, including his 27 years in jail Michael Anderson, 98 Film director was best known for The Dam Busters and Around The World In 80 Days – for which he wrangled more than 68,000 extras Verne Troyer, 49 The 2ft 8in actor was best known as Mini- Me in Austin Powers films. Began his film career in 1994 playing the stunt double for a baby Avicii, 28 Swedish DJ, real name Tim Bergling, began at 16 posting remixes online. Grammy nominated for 2012 hit Sunshine with David Guetta Dale Winton, 62 Presenter of TV game shows including Supermarket Sweep and Pets Win Prizes. Died of natural causes after years of health problems May Jlloyd Samuel, 37 Footie star moved to Britain from his native Trinidad and Tobago and played for Aston Villa and Bolton Wanderers. Died in a car crash Tom Wolfe, 87 Journalist and author best known for 1987 novel The Bonfire Of The Vanities, which became a film. Also known for his white suit Margot Kidder, 69 Canadian actress best known for her feisty, funny Lois Lane to Christopher Reeve’s Superman in 1978 film. Later a political activist Tessa Jowell, 70 Labour MP who helped to bring the Olympics to London and was beloved on all sides of politics. Fought to improve cancer treatment June Leslie Grantham, 71 Turned to acting after a jail term for the 1966 murder of a German cabbie – then became a big star as EastEnders’ ‘Dirty’ Den Watts Peter Stringfellow, 77 Went from tie salesman to king of a nightclub empire. His most famous club in central London was named after himself Kate Spade, 55 American handbag designer whose stylish products were a Nineties sensation, even being name-checked on telly hit Sex And The City Joe Jackson, 89 Dad to and manager of the Jackson 5, who once admitted he whipped son Michael with a belt but insisted he “never beat him” July Ellie Soutter, 18 Talented Team GB snowboarder who was tipped to star at the 2022 Winter Olympics. Took her own life on her 18th birthday Peter Firmin, 89 Puppet maker who, along with Oliver Postgate, created The Clangers and other kids’ classics such as Ivor The Engine and Bagpuss Lord Carrington, 99 Tory politician quit as PM Margaret Thatcher’s Foreign Secretary in 1982 for failing to predict the Argentine invasion of the Falklands August Kofi Annan, 80 UN Secretary-General from 1997 to 2006. The Ghanian won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001 for his work championing human rights Barry Chuckle, 73 Actor and half of kids’ comic duo the Chuckle Brothers. He kept his bone cancer secret – even from his family – for two years Neil Simon, 91 American playwright was the Broadway master of comedy whose hits included Barefoot In The Park and The Odd Couple August Fenella Fielding, 90 Husky-voiced Carry On actress once considered suicide by gorging on spaghetti. Had two lovers on the go for 20 years Burt Reynolds, 82 Smokey And The Bandit heart-throb was a Seventies and Eighties film icon. Was nominated for an Oscar for 1997 film Boogie Nights Rachel Bland, 40 Presenter inspired listeners with her podcast You, Me And The Big C about two-year breast cancer battle. Also wrote award-winning blog Aretha Franklin, 76 Legendary singer dubbed the Queen Of Soul, famous for hits such as I Say A Little Prayer and Respect. Sold 75million records over 60-year career September Denis Norden, 96 Wrote first comedy script for the BBC aged 19, leading to 60-year radio and TV career. Best known as host of It’ll Be Alright On The Night Geoffrey Hayes, 76 TV presenter fondly remembered by a generation of kids after fronting more than 1,000 episodes of Rainbow from 1973 to 1992 Chas Hodges, 74 Musician found fame in Seventies and Eighties as one half of Chas & Dave. Their Cockney-style songs included Rabbit and Snooker Loopy October Charles Aznavour, 74 Talented singer dubbed ‘France’s Sinatra’ whose biggest hit in English, 1974’s She, featured in movie Notting Hill Paul Allen, 65 US billionaire co- founded Microsoft with school pal Bill Gates and turned it into the world’s biggest software firm. He died of cancer Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, 60 Thai owner of Leicester City who led the club to Premier League title glory in 2016. Died in helicopter crash Babs Beverley, 91 As a singer in 1950s trio the Beverley Sisters she had hits including I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus and Little Drummer Boy Jean Trumpington, 96 A World War Two Bletchley Park code breaker, who as a Baroness famously gave a fellow peer a V-sign in the House of Lords in 2011 November Stan Lee, 95 The comic book legend helped create The X-Men, Iron Man and the Incredible Hulk. He had cameos in every Marvel film George Bush, 94 Ex-US President who lived longer than his 40 predecessors. In office from ’89 to ’93, including first Gulf War. Father of George W Bush Richard Baker, 93 BBC newsreader who presented the first TV news bulletin in 1954 and voiced animated children’s classic Mary, Mungo And Midge Andrew Burt, 73 Best known as the original Jack Sugden in Emmerdale, the actor went on to star in I’m Alan Partridge before training to be a counsellor [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN UK NEWS” posts_category=”1″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] December Peter Armitage, 78 Actor played Kevin Webster’s father Bill in Coronation Street and returned to the soap several times before finally leaving in 2011 Pete Shelley, 63 Fronted legendary Manchester punk pioneers The Buzzcocks. Died from suspected  heart attack in Estonia, where he lived Paddy Ashdown, 77 Former Royal Marine served as Lib Dem leader from 1988 to 1999. Died following a short battle with bladder cancer Wendy Beckett, 88 Nun found unlikely TV fame as an art critic in 1990s after she was overheard enthusing at an art exhibition by a BBC film crew June Whitfield, 93 Best known as the gran in Absolutely Fabulous, as well as in sitcom Terry And June and Carry On films [boxout headline=”Hell Corner” featured-image=”3690958″]Dennis Nilsen, 72, died May 12 Former civil servant killed at least 15 men and stashed remains under the floor of his North London home. Died in a maximum security prison. James ‘Whitey’ Bulger, 89, died October 30 Ex-Boston gangster evaded capture for 16 years before being caught in 2011 and convicted for 11 murders. Inspired 2015 Johnny Depp film Black Mass.[/boxout] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
01 Jan 19
The Irish Sun
IN 2018 the world has been forced to bid a sad farewell to some of its most famous and beloved stars from the world of sports, entertainment and television. Here we take an opportunity to honour some of the iconic figures who are no longer with us…   January Bella Emberg, 80 Comedy actress best known for TV partnership with Russ Abbot in the 1980s, especially for her spoof character Blunder Woman Mark E. Smith, 60 Founded post-punk group The Fall and was the only original member of the constantly changing line-up in its 42-year history Dolores O’Riordan, 46 Cranberries lead singer and judge on Irish version of The Voice ­accidentally drowned in a bath due to sedation by alcohol Jimmy Armfield, 82 Blackpool and England football hero and later BBC pundit who won 42 caps for England and was in the winning 1966 World Cup squad Ingvar Kamprad, 91 As founder of Ikea, the  Swedish magnate revolutionised the way the world lives, introducing us to flat-pack furniture and Swedish meatballs Simon Shelton, 52 Actor who played Teletubby Tinky Winky from 1997 to 2001, a role he likened to being in The Beatles. He died of hypothermia Cyrille Regis, 59 England striker who was a ­pioneer for black footballers. Clubs included West Brom, Coventry City and Aston Villa in his 19-year career February John Mahoney, 77 Actor who played Martin Crane in ­TV’s Frasier. Born in Blackpool, he edited a medical journal before becoming an actor in his thirties Billy Graham, 99 US evangelist was among world’s most influential preachers. Gave spiritual counselling to every US President from Truman to Obama Emma Chambers, 53 British TV and film actress was best known for her role as Alice in the long-running sitcom The Vicar Of Dibley, and the film Notting Hill March Ken Dodd, 90 The veteran Liverpudlian comic was instantly recognisable by his wild hair and big front teeth. Was knighted in the 2017 New Year Honours and was given a funeral fit for showbiz royalty, with mourners waving tickling sticks Hubert de Givenchy, 91 French designer who founded fashion firm in 1952 and styled Jackie Kennedy and Audrey Hepburn Jim Bowen, 89 Hosted TV darts show Bullseye for 14 years, with catchphrases ‘Here’s what you could’ve won,’ and ‘Super, smashing, great’ Roger Bannister, 88 Athletics legend who ran world’s first sub-four-minute mile in Oxford on May 6, 1954. Later a distinguished neurologist Stephen Hawking, 76 Physicist who had same Cambridge University post once held by Sir Isaac Newton. Wrote 1988 best-seller A Brief History Of Time Bill Maynard, 89 Actor best known as rogue Claude Greengrass in ITV’s Heartbeat. Also unsuccessfully ran against Tony Benn in a 1984 by-election April Ray Wilkins, 61 Footie hero began career at Chelsea, where he was captain at 18. Lifted FA Cup with Man Utd and won 84 caps for England Eric Bristow, 60 Hugely popular darts ace known as the Crafty Cockney. Was five times world champ in an astounding pro career before retiring in 2007 Winnie Mandela, 81 The anti-apartheid activist was married to former South African President Nelson Mandela for 38 years, including his 27 years in jail Michael Anderson, 98 Film director was best known for The Dam Busters and Around The World In 80 Days – for which he wrangled more than 68,000 extras Verne Troyer, 49 The 2ft 8in actor was best known as Mini- Me in Austin Powers films. Began his film career in 1994 playing the stunt double for a baby Avicii, 28 Swedish DJ, real name Tim Bergling, began at 16 posting remixes online. Grammy nominated for 2012 hit Sunshine with David Guetta Dale Winton, 62 Presenter of TV game shows including Supermarket Sweep and Pets Win Prizes. Died of natural causes after years of health problems May Jlloyd Samuel, 37 Footie star moved to Britain from his native Trinidad and Tobago and played for Aston Villa and Bolton Wanderers. Died in a car crash Tom Wolfe, 87 Journalist and author best known for 1987 novel The Bonfire Of The Vanities, which became a film. Also known for his white suit Margot Kidder, 69 Canadian actress best known for her feisty, funny Lois Lane to Christopher Reeve’s Superman in 1978 film. Later a political activist Tessa Jowell, 70 Labour MP who helped to bring the Olympics to London and was beloved on all sides of politics. Fought to improve cancer treatment June Leslie Grantham, 71 Turned to acting after a jail term for the 1966 murder of a German cabbie – then became a big star as EastEnders’ ‘Dirty’ Den Watts Peter Stringfellow, 77 Went from tie salesman to king of a nightclub empire. His most famous club in central London was named after himself Kate Spade, 55 American handbag designer whose stylish products were a Nineties sensation, even being name-checked on telly hit Sex And The City Joe Jackson, 89 Dad to and manager of the Jackson 5, who once admitted he whipped son Michael with a belt but insisted he “never beat him” July Ellie Soutter, 18 Talented Team GB snowboarder who was tipped to star at the 2022 Winter Olympics. Took her own life on her 18th birthday Peter Firmin, 89 Puppet maker who, along with Oliver Postgate, created The Clangers and other kids’ classics such as Ivor The Engine and Bagpuss Lord Carrington, 99 Tory politician quit as PM Margaret Thatcher’s Foreign Secretary in 1982 for failing to predict the Argentine invasion of the Falklands August Kofi Annan, 80 UN Secretary-General from 1997 to 2006. The Ghanian won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001 for his work championing human rights Barry Chuckle, 73 Actor and half of kids’ comic duo the Chuckle Brothers. He kept his bone cancer secret – even from his family – for two years Neil Simon, 91 American playwright was the Broadway master of comedy whose hits included Barefoot In The Park and The Odd Couple August Fenella Fielding, 90 Husky-voiced Carry On actress once considered suicide by gorging on spaghetti. Had two lovers on the go for 20 years Burt Reynolds, 82 Smokey And The Bandit heart-throb was a Seventies and Eighties film icon. Was nominated for an Oscar for 1997 film Boogie Nights Rachel Bland, 40 Presenter inspired listeners with her podcast You, Me And The Big C about two-year breast cancer battle. Also wrote award-winning blog Aretha Franklin, 76 Legendary singer dubbed the Queen Of Soul, famous for hits such as I Say A Little Prayer and Respect. Sold 75million records over 60-year career September Denis Norden, 96 Wrote first comedy script for the BBC aged 19, leading to 60-year radio and TV career. Best known as host of It’ll Be Alright On The Night Geoffrey Hayes, 76 TV presenter fondly remembered by a generation of kids after fronting more than 1,000 episodes of Rainbow from 1973 to 1992 Chas Hodges, 74 Musician found fame in Seventies and Eighties as one half of Chas & Dave. Their Cockney-style songs included Rabbit and Snooker Loopy October Charles Aznavour, 74 Talented singer dubbed ‘France’s Sinatra’ whose biggest hit in English, 1974’s She, featured in movie Notting Hill Paul Allen, 65 US billionaire co- founded Microsoft with school pal Bill Gates and turned it into the world’s biggest software firm. He died of cancer Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, 60 Thai owner of Leicester City who led the club to Premier League title glory in 2016. Died in helicopter crash Babs Beverley, 91 As a singer in 1950s trio the Beverley Sisters she had hits including I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus and Little Drummer Boy Jean Trumpington, 96 A World War Two Bletchley Park code breaker, who as a Baroness famously gave a fellow peer a V-sign in the House of Lords in 2011 November Stan Lee, 95 The comic book legend helped create The X-Men, Iron Man and the Incredible Hulk. He had cameos in every Marvel film George Bush, 94 Ex-US President who lived longer than his 40 predecessors. In office from ’89 to ’93, including first Gulf War. Father of George W Bush Richard Baker, 93 BBC newsreader who presented the first TV news bulletin in 1954 and voiced animated children’s classic Mary, Mungo And Midge Andrew Burt, 73 Best known as the original Jack Sugden in Emmerdale, the actor went on to star in I’m Alan Partridge before training to be a counsellor [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN UK NEWS” posts_category=”1″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] December Peter Armitage, 78 Actor played Kevin Webster’s father Bill in Coronation Street and returned to the soap several times before finally leaving in 2011 Pete Shelley, 63 Fronted legendary Manchester punk pioneers The Buzzcocks. Died from suspected  heart attack in Estonia, where he lived Paddy Ashdown, 77 Former Royal Marine served as Lib Dem leader from 1988 to 1999. Died following a short battle with bladder cancer Wendy Beckett, 88 Nun found unlikely TV fame as an art critic in 1990s after she was overheard enthusing at an art exhibition by a BBC film crew June Whitfield, 93 Best known as the gran in Absolutely Fabulous, as well as in sitcom Terry And June and Carry On films [boxout headline=”Hell Corner” featured-image=”3576470″]Dennis Nilsen, 72, died May 12 Former civil servant killed at least 15 men and stashed remains under the floor of his North London home. Died in a maximum security prison. James ‘Whitey’ Bulger, 89, died October 30 Ex-Boston gangster evaded capture for 16 years before being caught in 2011 and convicted for 11 murders. Inspired 2015 Johnny Depp film Black Mass.[/boxout] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
31 Dec 18
herbinkitchen

We are getting ready to wrap up 2018! Here are some recipe ideas from some of my posts over at Parade. This post is the last one the year and it is from an episode of Food Network’s Barefoot Contessa when the stars of Mary Poppins Returns stopped by to help make a meal in […]

30 Dec 18
Intel Today

“Those who fell yesterday were far from home and close to the enemy, doing the hard work that must be done to protect our country from terrorism. We owe them our deepest gratitude, and we pledge to them and their families that we will never cease fighting for the cause to which they dedicated their […]