Rider

23 Feb 19
The Inner Workings Of A Redhead

The only uncomfortable part about leaving my comfort zone to start riding a spin bike was the seat… but I’d rather have a sore ass than just sit on my ass and do nothing different or new or fun like spinning.

23 Feb 19
True Criminal Justice

https://nypost.com/2019/02/23/cops-h…le-bus-riders/ Cops hunt for creep who rubbed himself against female bus riders By Amanda Woods February 23, 2019 | 11:40am Police say this man allegedly rubbed his groin on two women on an MTA bus. Cops are hunting a creep who allegedly rubbed his groin on a teen girl and another woman on a MTA […]

23 Feb 19
Parlay Game

HAMPTON, GA (Parlay Game) – NASCAR has long been waiting for its competition product to be even better and is looking forward to the results of a new racing package designed to increase the entertainment factor of the troubled series. The new rules make their debut Sunday at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, where the prevailing […]

23 Feb 19
Road Bike Rider

Looking for a new energy bar brand? We’ve compiled this list of every energy bar brand we could find. When you’re an endurance athlete, it’s important to find a bar that your stomach can tolerate during exercise that also gives you enough energy, with the right ingredients for your requirements. There are so many different […]

23 Feb 19
Tony's Tasmanian Cycling Blog

Here we are. North-Eastern Tasmania at Evandale attending the National Penny Farthing Championships once more. I decided I would like to ride in the Grand Parade this year and so needed to get the trike there. What better way than to ride it?

23 Feb 19
CBS New York

MTA officials have released their plan for a new fare payment system called OMNY, short for One Metro New York.

23 Feb 19
European Summer Adventure 2018

ADVANTAGES TO TRAIN TRAVEL IN EUROPE 1) Arrive in the Center of Town -Unlike airports, European train stations are located right in the middle of town. You don’t have to spend time and money traveling into the city because you’re already there. In contrast, traveling from the airport into the city can take anywhere from […]

23 Feb 19
Steve Munro

With official ridership stats flat or falling over the past few years, and the annual pressure to raise fares to balance the budget, the issue of fare evasion comes up regularly as an untapped revenue source. This became a particular concern with the move to all-door loading on, primarily, the streetcar network where the absence […]

23 Feb 19
Roc Sports NOW

More action from the Alliance!

23 Feb 19

The Wild Riders charge forth! The Wood Elves get reinforcements this issue, and we put them to the test in the Battle of Fell Glade, a battle report against the vile Beastmen. We’re also proud to present a brand-new minigame for the new Treeman miniature called ‘The Defence of Athel Loren’. About this Series: White […]

23 Feb 19
Horses in the South - A Horse Blog

Photo © Lily Forado. Wellington, FL – February 22, 2019 – The 2019 Florida International Youth Dressage Championships (FIYDC), presented by Sarah Davis, Terri Kane, USEF Dressage Owners Task Force, Hampton Green Farm, and Dressage4kids, will take place during week 8 at the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) on February 27 – March 3 at […]

23 Feb 19
North Norfolk Wheelers

Numbers were down today for such mundane reasons as: – in Vietnam; fell out of a forklift truck; the annual seal party (presumably balancing a ball on the nose and eating raw fish). Three Wheelers headed off into the chilly mist by way of Itteringham, Heydon Park, Odessa, Kerdiston, Themelthorpe, Foxley, Billingford and Robertson Barracks […]

23 Feb 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Gov. Gavin Newsom’s decision to pause the most expensive portions of the state’s high-speed rail project offers an opportunity to reexamine the future of intercity passenger rail in California. Although the bullet train was poorly conceived and executed, targeted investments in passenger rail could play a role in reducing congestion and pollution. To get these benefits, however, California should set aside grandiose new projects, concentrate on large urban areas, and build upon existing infrastructure. Train service already connects Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Bakersfield — the cities to be served by Gov. Newsom’s scaled back bullet train plan. Amtrak’s San Joacquins offers seven daily trains running between these cities and Los Angeles. But rather than use the existing track in these areas, high-speed rail planners built a new right of way — destroying farms and businesses and forcing the relocation of a portion of Highway 99. This decision was dictated, in part, by the need for the straighter tracks required if high-speed trains are going to try to hit full 220-miles per hour speeds. If, rather than a lavish San Diego to Sacramento high-speed rail system, state leaders had started with a more focused goal of better, faster intercity rail travel and given flexibility to achieve this objective, the state might already be reaping rewards. So, as the California High-Speed Rail Authority considers what to do now, let’s hope they focus on a more realistic intercity train improvement program that emphasizes Southern California, where traffic congestion and emissions are greatest. For example, San Diego’s Santa Fe Depot and Los Angeles Union Station are only 128 miles apart and are already served by passenger rail. But Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner, which runs from San Diego to San Luis Obispo, has only 13 daily departures. The scheduled travel time from San Diego to Los Angeles is about three hours but riders frequently encounter delays and cancellations. If service was faster, more frequent, and more reliable, more travelers might be lured away from driving on clogged Interstate 405. Major improvements are possible along this line without high-speed rail. The corridor could use additional parallel tracks to speed up trips and allow trains to pass each other. Also, grade level crossings could be replaced with overpasses and underpasses to reduce the need for trains to slow down. Grade separation projects allow faster and more frequent train service, and also improve safety and reduce disruption to communities through which trains pass. LOSSAN, the joint powers agency responsible for the Surfliner rail corridor, is working on grade separation projects in Santa Ana and Anaheim, but that will still leave dozens of grade level crossings in place. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Surfliner corridor improvements could provide far more benefits per dollar spent than high-speed rail would’ve delivered. If California shifts its focus to serving shorter distances and urban areas, it might also create opportunities for the private financing that never materialized for the statewide rail system. In Florida, a private company, Brightline, is already running trains from Miami to West Palm Beach and plans to extend service to Orlando. Between West Palm Beach and Orlando, Brightline’s maximum speed is expected to be 125 miles per hour (mph). Although this is far below the speeds — 220 mph — that bullet train supporters dreamed of here, it is faster than passenger cars are allowed to go and might offer competitive travel times over distances like San Diego to Los Angeles, especially if freeways are gridlocked. Private operators, who have incentives to improve service and control costs, could improve the LOSSAN corridor. And, ultimately, by focusing on shorter routes between largely populated cities, upgraded, privately-operated rail could deliver more benefits at a fraction of high-speed rail’s costs — even if the state considered subsidizing some of the expenses. Gov. Newsom did Californians a huge favor by admitting the truth about the failed high-speed rail plan. Now if planners think rail should be part of our transportation future, they need to break out of the ill-conceived high-speed rail box they’ve been trapped in for a decade. Marc Joffe is a policy analyst at Reason Foundation.
23 Feb 19
Pasadena Star News
Gov. Gavin Newsom’s decision to pause the most expensive portions of the state’s high-speed rail project offers an opportunity to reexamine the future of intercity passenger rail in California. Although the bullet train was poorly conceived and executed, targeted investments in passenger rail could play a role in reducing congestion and pollution. To get these benefits, however, California should set aside grandiose new projects, concentrate on large urban areas, and build upon existing infrastructure. Train service already connects Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Bakersfield — the cities to be served by Gov. Newsom’s scaled back bullet train plan. Amtrak’s San Joacquins offers seven daily trains running between these cities and Los Angeles. But rather than use the existing track in these areas, high-speed rail planners built a new right of way — destroying farms and businesses and forcing the relocation of a portion of Highway 99. This decision was dictated, in part, by the need for the straighter tracks required if high-speed trains are going to try to hit full 220-miles per hour speeds. If, rather than a lavish San Diego to Sacramento high-speed rail system, state leaders had started with a more focused goal of better, faster intercity rail travel and given flexibility to achieve this objective, the state might already be reaping rewards. So, as the California High-Speed Rail Authority considers what to do now, let’s hope they focus on a more realistic intercity train improvement program that emphasizes Southern California, where traffic congestion and emissions are greatest. For example, San Diego’s Santa Fe Depot and Los Angeles Union Station are only 128 miles apart and are already served by passenger rail. But Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner, which runs from San Diego to San Luis Obispo, has only 13 daily departures. The scheduled travel time from San Diego to Los Angeles is about three hours but riders frequently encounter delays and cancellations. If service was faster, more frequent, and more reliable, more travelers might be lured away from driving on clogged Interstate 405. Major improvements are possible along this line without high-speed rail. The corridor could use additional parallel tracks to speed up trips and allow trains to pass each other. Also, grade level crossings could be replaced with overpasses and underpasses to reduce the need for trains to slow down. Grade separation projects allow faster and more frequent train service, and also improve safety and reduce disruption to communities through which trains pass. LOSSAN, the joint powers agency responsible for the Surfliner rail corridor, is working on grade separation projects in Santa Ana and Anaheim, but that will still leave dozens of grade level crossings in place. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Surfliner corridor improvements could provide far more benefits per dollar spent than high-speed rail would’ve delivered. If California shifts its focus to serving shorter distances and urban areas, it might also create opportunities for the private financing that never materialized for the statewide rail system. In Florida, a private company, Brightline, is already running trains from Miami to West Palm Beach and plans to extend service to Orlando. Between West Palm Beach and Orlando, Brightline’s maximum speed is expected to be 125 miles per hour (mph). Although this is far below the speeds — 220 mph — that bullet train supporters dreamed of here, it is faster than passenger cars are allowed to go and might offer competitive travel times over distances like San Diego to Los Angeles, especially if freeways are gridlocked. Private operators, who have incentives to improve service and control costs, could improve the LOSSAN corridor. And, ultimately, by focusing on shorter routes between largely populated cities, upgraded, privately-operated rail could deliver more benefits at a fraction of high-speed rail’s costs — even if the state considered subsidizing some of the expenses. Gov. Newsom did Californians a huge favor by admitting the truth about the failed high-speed rail plan. Now if planners think rail should be part of our transportation future, they need to break out of the ill-conceived high-speed rail box they’ve been trapped in for a decade. Marc Joffe is a policy analyst at Reason Foundation.
23 Feb 19
Orange County Register
Gov. Gavin Newsom’s decision to pause the most expensive portions of the state’s high-speed rail project offers an opportunity to reexamine the future of intercity passenger rail in California. Although the bullet train was poorly conceived and executed, targeted investments in passenger rail could play a role in reducing congestion and pollution. To get these benefits, however, California should set aside grandiose new projects, concentrate on large urban areas, and build upon existing infrastructure. Train service already connects Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Bakersfield — the cities to be served by Gov. Newsom’s scaled back bullet train plan. Amtrak’s San Joacquins offers seven daily trains running between these cities and Los Angeles. But rather than use the existing track in these areas, high-speed rail planners built a new right of way — destroying farms and businesses and forcing the relocation of a portion of Highway 99. This decision was dictated, in part, by the need for the straighter tracks required if high-speed trains are going to try to hit full 220-miles per hour speeds. If, rather than a lavish San Diego to Sacramento high-speed rail system, state leaders had started with a more focused goal of better, faster intercity rail travel and given flexibility to achieve this objective, the state might already be reaping rewards. So, as the California High-Speed Rail Authority considers what to do now, let’s hope they focus on a more realistic intercity train improvement program that emphasizes Southern California, where traffic congestion and emissions are greatest. For example, San Diego’s Santa Fe Depot and Los Angeles Union Station are only 128 miles apart and are already served by passenger rail. But Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner, which runs from San Diego to San Luis Obispo, has only 13 daily departures. The scheduled travel time from San Diego to Los Angeles is about three hours but riders frequently encounter delays and cancellations. If service was faster, more frequent, and more reliable, more travelers might be lured away from driving on clogged Interstate 405. Major improvements are possible along this line without high-speed rail. The corridor could use additional parallel tracks to speed up trips and allow trains to pass each other. Also, grade level crossings could be replaced with overpasses and underpasses to reduce the need for trains to slow down. Grade separation projects allow faster and more frequent train service, and also improve safety and reduce disruption to communities through which trains pass. LOSSAN, the joint powers agency responsible for the Surfliner rail corridor, is working on grade separation projects in Santa Ana and Anaheim, but that will still leave dozens of grade level crossings in place. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Surfliner corridor improvements could provide far more benefits per dollar spent than high-speed rail would’ve delivered. If California shifts its focus to serving shorter distances and urban areas, it might also create opportunities for the private financing that never materialized for the statewide rail system. In Florida, a private company, Brightline, is already running trains from Miami to West Palm Beach and plans to extend service to Orlando. Between West Palm Beach and Orlando, Brightline’s maximum speed is expected to be 125 miles per hour (mph). Although this is far below the speeds — 220 mph — that bullet train supporters dreamed of here, it is faster than passenger cars are allowed to go and might offer competitive travel times over distances like San Diego to Los Angeles, especially if freeways are gridlocked. Private operators, who have incentives to improve service and control costs, could improve the LOSSAN corridor. And, ultimately, by focusing on shorter routes between largely populated cities, upgraded, privately-operated rail could deliver more benefits at a fraction of high-speed rail’s costs — even if the state considered subsidizing some of the expenses. Gov. Newsom did Californians a huge favor by admitting the truth about the failed high-speed rail plan. Now if planners think rail should be part of our transportation future, they need to break out of the ill-conceived high-speed rail box they’ve been trapped in for a decade. Marc Joffe is a policy analyst at Reason Foundation.
23 Feb 19
jlippinbike

Saturday PFW B-Ride Out of Plainsboro At 5 minutes of 9 this morning I still had no takers. And I never got any emails warning me that people would attend. So I was about to give up hope that someone would give me my 10th and final ride sheet for the year. Then one, and […]