Riedel

15 Jun 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
The leading headline in Thursday’s local paper reads, “Hay Truck Overturns.” The article- which appears above the fold— includes a photo of stacked bales as if they’d been set down next to the highway by some ancient agricultural deity. The 50-point bold type is a reminder that in a small town, that which bleeds does not always lead. –excerpt from “Headline” by Armand Brint It is not unusual for newcomers and visitors to Mendocino County to marvel at the number of literary events that take place in the region. The annual Ukiah Haiku Festival, monthly Writers Read series and numerous poetry and writing events in Willits and up and down the Mendocino Coast have established Mendocino County as a place where written and spoken words are venerated and appreciated. Armand Brint, former Ukiah Poet Laureate will be reading from his latest book on June 27th at the Grace Hudson Museum. Three Ukiah Poets Laureate, with the help of colleagues and friends are largely responsible for the longevity and success of Writers Read- a monthly presentation of a featured writer, poet or author- sometimes local, sometimes a luminary from out of the area- who share their work with the public, followed by an open mic event. This month’s Writers Read, which takes place Thursday, June 27thfeatures the poetry of Armand Brint, who will be presenting the first major reading from his latest book, “Aliens of the Midway.” Brint and fellow Poets Laureate Dan Barth and Michael Riedell have been involved with the development and the preservation of this monthly series, launched in 2001 by Susan Sparrow and Hal Bennett, at about the time the Ukiah Poet Laureate committee was formed. “Susan was interested in Writers Read as a way to create congeniality and connection between local writers,” Brint explains. An event format was created by Bill Churchill and Theresa Whitehead. “We’re still using Theresa’s templates to continue the event,” notes Barth, who now coordinates the events with Riedell. Over the past decade-and-a-half, the event location has moved several times, but has now found a welcoming home in the Grace Hudson Museum’s public room. The readings take place on the last Thursday of the month. Dan Barth notes that the interest and support of the museum has helped to expand their audience. “David Burton has been very helpful. The museum puts up information about Writers Read on their social media feeds. We all have email lists that we send information to each month. The turnout has been great. Dozens of people have been attending.” “Dan read a few months ago. The turnout was huge,” notes Brint. “We try to balance gender, focus and local readers versus out-of-town readers,” Barth continues. “It’s amazing our community has such a great spoken word tradition, which developed over the past 18 years. It’s remarkably consistent and the quality has been high,” says Brint. “People don’t think of Ukiah as an arts community, but there’s a very strong spoken word, visual arts and musical community here,” Barth continues. The group received praise for the caliber of local writing from California Poet Laureate Dana Gioia when he presented his work at a Writers Read event. “We had a poetry community audience when Dana came here. At the end of the event, Dana’s wife said, ‘Sometimes we go to places and all the poets sound the same. You guys were really diverse and really good.’” “We influence each other, but not overly so,” Barth smiles. The poetry community is geographically isolated, but the trio try to participate in as many county events as they can, and credit the hard work and vision of Gordon Black, Dan Roberts, Mary Norbert-Korte, Ruth Weiss, Blake Moore and Robin Rule for their support of Mendocino County poets and authors. “Dan is the archivist of county poets. If someone passes away, Dan will air that person’s poems on KZYX the following week,” says Reidel. As an English instructor at Ukiah High, Reidel has a unique perspective on how the next generation views and uses the spoken word. “I guess as an English teacher, I’m partially culpable for people’s distaste of poetry,” he smiles. “In the past, teachers chose poems for their students that were difficult and required teaching to understand- poems students couldn’t get by themselves.” This group, like so many others in the area is observing the aging of their core enthusiasts, with fewer young people coming to the forefront. Reidel notes that an annual countywide Poetry Slam group with a 15-year track record recently got cancelled due to lack of interest. “Last year our Ukiah group was ready to go. Maybe the departure of some of the magnet students had an impact- that charismatic center wasn’t there.” But Riedel has also had successes getting younger people interested in poetry- some even dipping their toes into reading at the Writers Read events. “Sometimes kids come out. Teens are hard to corral, and poets and teens together is like herding cats- lot of cats,” he smiles. “Out-loud reading is very different from the classroom. I took a 17-year-old-student to the annual poetry reading at the Hill House in Mendocino. I realized that this was the most important person in the room, especially when one of the presenters mentioned that ‘it was so nice to see people under the age of 100 here.’” “Listening to kids when they read- they’re more raw, more emotionally honest. Adults can be more clever. They couch their emotions and truths in other ways. But way before they’re clever, kids are honest,” says Barth. Riedel notes that young people regularly post poetry on Instagram and other social media sites, but all three note that reading one’s work in a live setting is a true test of one’s mettle and an excellent way to road-test unfinished work. “Being part of monthly Writers Read creates a place where there’s pressure- humans face-to-face with one another,” says Reidel. He turns to Brint and Barth. “For a long time, I wrote in my notebooks. You guys were in the room when I read for the first time.” “I’ll often read something that I’m working on. You don’t receive direct feedback, but you’re completing the process,” says Barth. “When you’re the reader and you hear the poem, it’s a great way to modify. You can hear the rhythm and the language. Reading out loud is the best way to edit and get feedback,” says Brint. “And from there, you realize that your poetry doesn’t need to be published in a book. It needs to be presented to other people. You get this feeling: now it’s finally done- done because I’ve shared it.” “Maybe the online space is good for people, because poets tend to be introverted,” Brint smiles. “Kids may have that feeling online, but I’m not sure they know the difference between that and the real thing. Writing is a solitary undertaking. Reading is flesh and blood- human beings in that room,” says Reidel. “Poets have the most in common with standup comedians- sometimes,” smiles Brint. Brint’s latest book, which he will be reading from at the upcoming event is a reflection on going to the Redwood Empire Fair. “In a small town that is somewhat conventional, you can observe so many interesting people and juxtapositions at the fair,” he explains. Barth’s latest book is entitled, “At the Corner of Vigor and Wisdom- New and Used Poems.” All three poets, and other local poets are featured in “Deep Valley, Poets Laureate of Ukiah, 2001-2018,” which was edited my Michael Reidel. Writers Read events are held on the last Thursday of the month in the public room at the Grace Hudson Museum. The event begins at 7:00. To be added to the Writers Read email lists, send a message to barth.dan@gmail.comor innisfree@pacific.net, or visit the museum’s Facebook page for the latest information.
14 Jun 19
Lady Deviant - SEATTLE, WA

Rammstein is like the mother you don’t talk back too. Or the wise old gangsta that sits in the back of the restaurant while everyone comes to him. For over 20 years they have unapologetically peeled back the layers of society, history, and “civilization” exposing those raw nasty bits for the world to see. Their exciting […]

14 Jun 19
News Directory

photo by: Charlie Riedel / AP Photo New York Yankees celebrates Clint Frazier, right, and Kendrys Morales (36) after they scored Austin Romine during the second game of the game in top row against Kansas City Royals, Saturday, 25 May , 2019, in Kansas City, Mo. <! – ARTICLE -> KANSAS CITY, Mo. (ap) – […]

14 Jun 19
The official Washington D.C. news site - timworld.info

National Kansas high court says education funding is adequate By JOHN HANNA AP Political Writer June 14, 2019 10:44 AM ORDER REPRINT → FILE – In this May 9, 2019 photo, State of Kansas attorney Toby Crouse, left, presents his case before the Kansas Supreme Court during oral arguments in a school funding case in […]

14 Jun 19
The official Washington D.C. news site - timworld.info

National Kansas high court says education funding is adequate By JOHN HANNA AP Political Writer June 14, 2019 10:44 AM ORDER REPRINT → FILE – In this May 9, 2019 photo, State of Kansas attorney Toby Crouse, left, presents his case before the Kansas Supreme Court during oral arguments in a school funding case in […]

14 Jun 19
News Directory

New Orleans should get everything possible for Anthony Davis. Pelicans might not be in this position again – a franchise player would have another team willing to bring young talent and drafts to picks up to them, even if it is not certain that it will only be one season. If New Orleans gets to […]

14 Jun 19
RIEDEL FASCINATION

I put thorough work into the literature themes I host and join.  Therefore, I only do those with a prize.  Kathryn is generous, with a bimonthly draw.  The chance to win a book is motivating!  I do not use Kindle and gladly accept every advantage on offer!  I will list my connections and I review […]

14 Jun 19
Earth & Solar System

This post was written by Prof. Grenville Turner FRS who set up the Isotope Group when he moved from Sheffield to Manchester in 1986. Grenville was one of the original UK Apollo sample and Luna sample Pricipal Investigators, and has trained many of the current UK and international cosmochemists and noble gas mass spectroscopy researchers. You […]

14 Jun 19
The Traveling Vineyard

Just broke my favorite Riedel glass, can anyone help ID the model? http://bit.ly/2II4BDp Submitted June 14, 2019 at 02:10AM by Terza_Rima via reddit http://bit.ly/31HtkR4

14 Jun 19
Real News Reports-Start Your Day Here

Attacks on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman have sent tensions soaring between Iran and the United States, and reinforced fears that the two countries could be hurtling toward an unintended war.With no diplomatic relations between the two countries, no serious dialogue underway despite efforts by other countries to mediate, and no let-up…

13 Jun 19
Daily Democrat
Two-time Olympian Kara Goucher always figured taking up trail running would provide a wild adventure. Just not this wild: Encountering a mountain lion at close range on a recent run. Like close-enough-to-touch range. Spooked, the big cat turned toward Goucher before bounding away. Also spooked, Goucher turned and high-tailed it out of there, too. “Hopefully,” Goucher said, “that’s the last time I see one.” Goucher is kicking up a little dust in her newest quest — trail running. Known for her racing prowess in distances from the 1,500 meters to the marathon, she’s taking part in her first trail marathon this weekend in Leadville, Colorado , on a route that ascends as high as 13,185 feet (4,019 meters). “The No. 1 goal is to finish and enjoy the experience,” Goucher said in a phone interview from her home in Boulder. “But I’m competitive by nature.” Name a distance, any long distance, and Goucher has no doubt trained for it. She had top-10 finishes in both the 5,000 and 10,000 at the 2008 Beijing Games. Four years later in London, she wound up 11th in the marathon. She also captured a bronze medal in the 10,000 at the 2007 world championships, only to have it upgraded to silver a decade later after a Turkish runner was disqualified for doping. “I just kept moving up and up” in distance, said the 40-year-old Goucher, who was a seven-time All-American in track and cross country at the University of Colorado . “I feel lucky that my career has gone on this long. I’ve been able to stay healthy enough to experience all these different things.” In January, she ran the Houston Marathon but dropped out after the 19-mile mark because of a hamstring injury. Soon after, she decided to embark on an off-the-beaten path — trail running. “Challenging myself in a few ways and kind of facing fears,” said Goucher, who’s been logging about 80 miles a week to prepare for Leadville . “I mean, trails are scary for me.” That’s because of the climbing, descents, rocky terrain and, of course, coming face to face with a mountain lion. This is how the situation earlier this spring unfolded: Goucher was running in a neighborhood leading to the trailhead when she came upon what she thought was a “weird-looking dog.” “Then I was like, ‘That’s a mountain lion!'” she said. “It happened so fast.” She knew what to do in such a situation — stand tall, raise her arms, make eye contact — and promptly forgot. “It all went out the window,” she said. “The worst thing you can do is turn your back.” She sprinted to a nearby construction site while the mountain lion sprang in the other direction (“its footsteps were so powerful,” she recalled). Once her heart rate slowed, she called her husband, Adam Goucher , who picked her up and drove her to another trail. In February, a Colorado runner near Fort Collins survived a mountain lion attack by wrestling the young animal to the ground and jamming his foot onto its neck to suffocate it to death. “I was pretty shaken up for a couple of days but then I just got back on the horse,” Goucher said. “I haven’t really run on the trails by myself since then, but I’ve been back out plenty.” These days, running is far from the only thing that fuels her. She and other athletes such as Alysia Montano and Allyson Felix are speaking out about the need for sponsors to support female competitors before, during and after pregnancy — that contracts shouldn’t penalize someone for starting a family. “I just can’t thank Alysia and Allyson enough for lending their voices because you get a lot of criticism,” said Goucher , who ran the 2011 Boston Marathon 6 ½ months after her son, Colt, was born. “We’re on the right side of history on it.” FILE – In this Aug. 5, 2012, file photo, Kara Goucher, of the United States, runs through central London as she competes in the women’s marathon at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Known for her racing prowess in distances from the 1,500 meters all the way up to the marathon, Goucher will blaze a new trail _ a dusty one at that. She’s taking part in her first trail marathon this weekend in Leadville, Colorado, on a route that ascends as high as 13,185 feet. She’s been ramping up her training through the hills of Boulder, where she even recently came face-to-face with a mountain lion. She always figured this would be a wild adventure. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File) Goucher is also an advocate for clean sports (attending an anti-doping conference in London), organizes a high school girls camp and volunteers at her son’s school. “It’s just living a little bit of a more full life,” Goucher said. Make no mistake: She’s not closing the door on trying to make a future Olympic or world championship team. “I don’t know if that voice will ever go away,” Goucher said. “My son was asking me the other day, ‘When are you going to retire from racing?’ I’m like, ‘Have you met me? Never!'”
13 Jun 19
The official Washington D.C. news site - timworld.info

National Business Schlitterbahn, Cedar Fair enter $261M water park sale deal The Associated Press June 13, 2019 01:27 PM ORDER REPRINT → FILE – In this Oct. 30, 2018, file photo, crews dismantle the Verruckt waterslide at the Schlitterbahn water park in Kansas City, Kan. A Texas-based water park company has sold two of its […]

13 Jun 19
MEDIANTEK

For the 14th consecutive year, Riedel Communications provided advanced intercom and signal distribution technologies and on-site engineering support for the Eurovision Song Contest, broadcast live from Tel Aviv.

12 Jun 19
Ethereal Whispers

What is acrylamide? Acrylamide is a chemical used primarily to make substances called polyacrylamide and acrylamide copolymers. Polyacrylamide and acrylamide copolymers are used in many industrial processes, such as the production of paper, dyes, and plastics, and in the treatment of drinking water and wastewater, including sewage. They are also found in consumer products, such […]