Riverside City College

26 Jun 19
Viewpoints Online

The recent firing of Norco College President Bryan Reece has warranted opposing responses from students and faculty around the Riverside Community College District.

25 Jun 19
Undenyable thoughts....

6.25.2019 Mel is an artist. If she isn’t playing music she’s listening to it. If she’s not painting something, she’s letting someone put a picture in her skin. She is a dreamer, a soul seeker. She hopes big and when things fall thru just as disappointed. She is usually quiet – but the best Mel […]

25 Jun 19
Lowmiller Consulting Group Blog

Cycling the city Cities Dublin disappoints: what happened to city cycling’s great hope? In 2013 the Irish capital was ranked among the world’s top 20 bike-friendly cities, but only a small part of the promised cycle network was ever built Heavy traffic on the Quays in Dublin. Photograph: Douglas O’Connor/Alamy Stock Photo One sunny May […]

24 Jun 19
Ascending the Stairs

It’s been a hard year…I know I haven’t posted in a long time.  I have simply not had the time or mental space to write or do genealogy. One of the biggest reasons is that my beloved Grandmother Olive passed away in December at the age of 101. She had slowed down the last few […]

24 Jun 19
Daily News
  Tarzana Neighborhood Council meets on June 25 at Tarzana Child Care Center on Beckford Avenue. (Google Street View)   Community meetings bring people together for exchange of ideas and memorable shared experiences plus the potential for positive personal and community enrichment. Here are this week’s, and upcoming, get-togethers.   Agoura Readers Book Club: Discusses “The Island of the Sea Women” by Lisa See, 6:30-7:30 p.m. June 25. Agoura Hills Library, 29901 Ladyface Court. 818-889-2278. bit.ly/2WtjlQq Tarzana Neighborhood Council: 7 p.m. June 25. Tarzana Child Care Center, 5700 Beckford Ave. 818-921-4992. www.tarzananc.org Channel Islands Chapter of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America: Bring your current project to discuss and work on, 9:30 a.m. June 26. Guild members show a curving beading technique for a patriotic bracelet. Newcomers are welcome to attend two meetings before becoming members. United Methodist Church, 291 Anacapa Drive, Camarillo. 805-484-9056. Email: president@channelislandsega.org. psrega.org Classics Book Club at Granada Hills Branch Library: Discusses “Giovanni’s Room” by James Baldwin, 1:30-3 p.m. June 26. 10640 Petit Ave. 818-368-5687. bit.ly/2WHy1X8 Mystery Book Club at Studio City Branch Library: Discusses “The ABC Murders” by Agatha Christie, 6:30-7:30 p.m. June 26. 12511 Moorpark St. 818-755-7873. bit.ly/2TVAqMT Canoga Park Neighborhood Council: 7 p.m. June 26. Canoga Park Community Center, 7248 Owensmouth Ave. 818-856-1060. www.canogaparknc.org Encino Neighborhood Council: 7 p.m. June 26. Refreshments, 6:30 p.m. Encino Community Center, 4935 Balboa Blvd. 818-971-6996. www.encinonc.org Neighborhood Council Valley Village: 7 p.m. June 26. Faith Presbyterian Church, 5000 Colfax Ave. 818-759-8204. www.myvalleyvillage.com The National Archives – Unlocking America’s Records: Senior archivist Randy Thompson and archives technician James Huntoon from the National Archives at Riverside give two talks on June 27: for educators, scholars and writers, 2:30-4:30 p.m.; for the general public, 6-8 p.m. Free but a reservation online is advised due to seating space. North Hollywood Regional Branch Library, 5211 Tujunga Ave., North Hollywood. 818-766-7185. bit.ly/2WJVUSI Voting Solutions for All People meeting: Learn about Los Angeles County’s Vote Centers, potential locations and how voting opportunities will change for 2020 elections, 6-8 p.m. June 27. Pacoima City Hall, 13520 Van Nuys Blvd. Felipe Escobar, 818-899-2454. vsap.lavote.net Panorama City Neighborhood Council: 6:30 p.m. June 27. Mission Community Hospital Medical Office Building, 14860 Roscoe Blvd. 818-714-2133. www.panoramacitync.org North Hollywood North East Neighborhood Council: 6:50 p.m. June 27. Los Angeles Fire Department Station 89, community room, 7063 Laurel Canyon Blvd. (enter through gate on the left and proceed to the back; community room is a separate building). 818-627-8505. www.nhnenc.org American Arts and Crafts Movement: Arlene Vidor, former historical preservation commissioner and Glendale Historical Society president, gives an illustrated talk on the topic at a meeting of the San Fernando Valley Historical Society, 7 p.m. June 27. Free; donations appreciated. Andrés Pico Adobe, 10940 Sepulveda Blvd., Mission Hills (enter parking lot from Brand Boulevard at Sepulveda Boulevard). www.facebook.com/SFVHS Northridge South Neighborhood Council: 7 p.m. June 27. Northridge Middle School, library, 17960 Chase St. northridgesouth.org Book Club at Chatsworth Branch Library: Discusses “Dewey: The Small Town Library Cat Who Touched the World” by Vicki Myron, 1:30-3 p.m. July 3. 21052 Devonshire St. 818-341-4276. bit.ly/2Kqnpu4; bit.ly/31OFFD8 Calabasas–Las Virgenes Historical Society Open House: The society celebrates their 40th anniversary, 4-6 p.m. July 3. Calabasas Library, special collections room, 200 Civic Center Way. 818-225-7616. www.calabasaslibrary.org Current Events Nonfiction Book Club at Studio City Branch Library: Discusses “The Color of the Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America” by Richard Rothstein, 12:15 p.m. July 5. 12511 Moorpark St. 818-755-7873. bit.ly/2voPbxq   Newport ’69 Pop Festival at Devonshire Downs – Request for Artifacts: The Museum of the San Fernando Valley is asking for artifacts from the event that took place at San Fernando Valley State College, now Cal State Northridge, including photographs or videos plus stories from those who attended. These memories and memorabilia are for a future exhibit and a possible concert. Contact the museum’s vice president Jackie Langa: jackie.langa@themuseumsfv.org or leave a message at the museum, 818-347-9665. The Museum of the San Fernando Valley, 18860 Nordhoff St., Suite 204, Northridge. www.themuseumsfv.org   ONGOING   Wings Over Wendy’s: Veterans of all services and their supporters meet, 8:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays. Wendy’s Restaurant, 22611 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. Email: wingsoverwendys@outlook.com. Ed, 818-421-8946. www.wingsoverwendys.com Alliance of Relative Caregivers: The group offers free support groups and related services for relative caregivers in the San Fernando Valley. Sylvie de Toledo, 818-789-1177 (sylviedetoledo@gmail.com); Pam Meeker, 818-203-2763 (pmsmom61@aol.com). allianceofrelativecaregivers.org Rotary Club of Woodland Hills: Noon-1 p.m. Wednesdays (except check website for last Wednesday of the month for time and location). Check website for scheduled speakers Cost $20 lunch. Woodland Hills Country Club, 21150 Dumetz Road. 818-754-4743. www.whrotary.org Rotary Club of Granada Hills: 12:10 p.m. Thursdays. Call for cost of lunch. Porter Valley Country Club, 19216 Singing Hills Drive. 818-408-6007. www.granadahillsrotary.com Send information at least two weeks in advance to holly.andres@dailynews.com. 818-713-3708. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
23 Jun 19
The Liberator Magazine

Written by Brooke Quach. Graphic by Emma Robinson. Originally published as part of the Spring 2019 “Challenge” Issue.–  The volleyball struck him in the head so hard that he only recognized the impact after his scrawny body fell on the floor. His ears rang, but he could still hear the big white boy with the […]

23 Jun 19
Archy news nety

21 News has compiled the following list of communities throughout the Valley that celebrate Independence Day with numerous events, fashion shows, festivals and other activities. If you wish to add an event not listed here, send an e-mail to news@wfmj.com Please note that some fireworks displays and events are scheduled on days other than July […]

22 Jun 19
A Long and Winding Journey

If you are planning a trip to England or Scotland, we hope some of these thoughts and tips will help your planning! Rail Travel in the UK Train travel in the UK, as in most of Europe, is easy, reliable and quite economical. In the UK, there are a number of railcards available that can result […]

22 Jun 19
News Directory

Baseball Prep Friday, 21 June Abraham Lincoln by Thomas Jefferson, DH, ppd. to 4 p.m. Monday Lewis Central 11, Red Oak 0, 6 inn. St. Albert by Shenandoah, ppd. until 2 July Harlan 6, Sergeant Bluff-Luton 4 Three-Center 9, Audubon 1 Logan-Magnolia 8, Riverside 0 Treynor 6, Missouri Valley 5 Stanton at Fremont-Mills, DH, ppd. […]

21 Jun 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
I watch a lot of sports on TV: baseball, college basketball, tennis and soccer, as examples. Hence, my living room is inundated with a busload of TV commercials for new automobiles as well as oil company products. My sons love to pick apart commercials that make no sense or frankly, do not tell the whole truth. And both automakers and oil companies lead the way in the doublespeak category. Many oil companies, Arco and Chevron for example, make the claim: No other gasoline gets you better gas mileage. Examine that statement. Of course not! All other petroleum products are basically the same: None of the “Top Tier” [cq comment=”added”]variety provides better mpg or worse mpg, just the same. Instead of new information, Arco ads give you a dancing hula girl who magically jumps off your dashboard into your engine, making her hair stand on end. So? Is this supposed to make me buy Arco gasoline? Using cute, animated cars (usually with a female voice), Chevron says their “Techron” additive cleans your engine and therefore, if you use Chevron “Top Tier gas” you will get a cleaner internal combustion engine and better gas mileage. A recent AAA study says additives in “Top Tier” gas do clean carbon deposits “known to reduce fuel economy,” but the benefit is not exclusive to one brand. Chevron gasoline is not the only gasoline containing additives and rated by the government as “Top Tier.” Clark.com, an energy newsletter that examines oil company claims, lists more than 50 retailers across the United States selling “Top Tier” licensed gasoline (yes, the government certifies these). Besides Arco and Chevron, these include BP, CITGO, 76, Exxon, Mobil, Phillips 66, Shell, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero. Even you patient folks who wait in line at the Costco to fill up are getting certified Top Tier gas. The folks at Clark.com point out the ads are a marketing strategy to get you to buy Chevron and to think it’s the only one with the additive. A recent study found “you can have what the study finds is the best gas at the lowest prices.” In short, Chevron and others are using the strategy as a way to say their gasoline is better than other “Top Tier” rated gasoline, a questionable claim. [cq comment=”i added this to make it more clear”] Morgan Crinklaw, a public relations person at Chevron in San Ramon, was not available on Friday. Now,  let’s turn to the question: Why aren’t more carmakers advertising their battery electric vehicles or plug-in electric models on TV? The answer may be hidden in what kinds of autos they DO advertise. Usually, these are higher-priced luxury cars running on fossil fuels, including SUVs and pickups, models with poor gas mileage and most importantly, high markups. Buying a pickup truck to ride in the city is ludicrous. It’s also bad for the environment. Here are some mpg numbers from popular pickups I grabbed from Car & Driver and Consumer Reports: Nissan Frontier: 17 mpg Chevrolet Colorado ZR2: 17 mpg Ford Ranger XLT: 20 mpg Toyota Tacoma SR5 V6: 19 mpg Ford F-150 XLT 2.7 EcoBoost: 19 mpg More gas-guzzling autos are robbing our children of a livable planet. They are also adding to the bad air we breathe. If you don’t care about the environment, think about your wallet. Gasoline prices are set to rise July 1 by 5.6 cents as the second round of a California gas tax for repairing roads kicks in. The amount of money you would save from a car with superior gas mileage is substantial. Better, driving an electric vehicle saves you even more money. Fueling up an ICE car that gets 30 mpg at a cost of $3.49 per gallon at 50 miles per day is about $2,124 per year. The cost of plugging in an electric car is $744 a year. And if you install solar and use the sun’s power to charge your EV, that drops it to $307 a year. Plus, you save by never having to get tune-ups, oil changes, transmission fixes, etc. because EVs have fewer moving parts. A Facebook group of EV owners discusses the lack of TV ads for Chevy Bolts (an electric vehicle with 238 miles per charge), Volts (a unique plug-in which gets around 60 miles on a charge plus a gasoline-engine boost that adds about 324 miles.) Some say Chevy believe smarter shoppers don’t need ads: They look online for EVs or shop by word of mouth. Audi does run TV commercials for its all-electric e-tron (204 miles per charge). The ad attempts to slay myths about electric cars: They’re slow; there’s no charging stations; they don’t go far. Car and Driver writer George Levy quotes Loren Angelo, VP of marketing for Audi of America, explaining a long-term strategy. Starting in 2025, Audi will make only electric cars. “As part of our commitment to electrification, we’ve recognized the need for more consumer education on what it really means to go electric,” Angelo said. Elvis Barksdale of the FB group chides Chevy. “Now is the time for GM to tell the buyers they are the leader. We own 2 Volts. People still tell me they have never heard of them,” he wrote. People still ask to me to explain my Volt to them. It’s been out since 2013. It’s like explaining a smart phone to my 88-year-old mother. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links How much can electric cars impact climate change? New report says a lot Edison says California needs one-quarter of its vehicles to be electric to meet climate change goals With electric cars available, the question arises: Why don’t you drive one? These researchers want California to be a global advocate about climate change With gas prices rising, sales of cheaper, ethanol-blended fuels are surging in California [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Electric car owner Robert Dickson, 63, of Glendora drives his 2017 Chevy Bolt EV which can go about 240 miles on a charge during celebration of National Drive Electric Week at The Center for Environmental Research and Technology at UC Riverside Sept. 10, 2017. (photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG.) More ads can’t hurt. But without more government help and more charging stations, U.S. consumers may continue to buy internal combustion engine pickups and SUVs because they drive automaker profits. And oil companies can still tout nonsense claims that keep the public blind to the real news: Electrification of automobiles is the future. Not some dancing hula girl. Steve Scauzillo covers public health, environment and transportation for the Southern California News Group. He’s a recipient of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @stevscaz or email him at sscauzillo@scng.com.
21 Jun 19
Orange County Register
I watch a lot of sports on TV: baseball, college basketball, tennis and soccer, as examples. Hence, my living room is inundated with a busload of TV commercials for new automobiles as well as oil company products. My sons love to pick apart commercials that make no sense or frankly, do not tell the whole truth. And both automakers and oil companies lead the way in the doublespeak category. Many oil companies, Arco and Chevron for example, make the claim: No other gasoline gets you better gas mileage. Examine that statement. Of course not! All other petroleum products are basically the same: None of the “Top Tier” [cq comment=”added”]variety provides better mpg or worse mpg, just the same. Instead of new information, Arco ads give you a dancing hula girl who magically jumps off your dashboard into your engine, making her hair stand on end. So? Is this supposed to make me buy Arco gasoline? Using cute, animated cars (usually with a female voice), Chevron says their “Techron” additive cleans your engine and therefore, if you use Chevron “Top Tier gas” you will get a cleaner internal combustion engine and better gas mileage. A recent AAA study says additives in “Top Tier” gas do clean carbon deposits “known to reduce fuel economy,” but the benefit is not exclusive to one brand. Chevron gasoline is not the only gasoline containing additives and rated by the government as “Top Tier.” Clark.com, an energy newsletter that examines oil company claims, lists more than 50 retailers across the United States selling “Top Tier” licensed gasoline (yes, the government certifies these). Besides Arco and Chevron, these include BP, CITGO, 76, Exxon, Mobil, Phillips 66, Shell, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero. Even you patient folks who wait in line at the Costco to fill up are getting certified Top Tier gas. The folks at Clark.com point out the ads are a marketing strategy to get you to buy Chevron and to think it’s the only one with the additive. A recent study found “you can have what the study finds is the best gas at the lowest prices.” In short, Chevron and others are using the strategy as a way to say their gasoline is better than other “Top Tier” rated gasoline, a questionable claim. [cq comment=”i added this to make it more clear”] Morgan Crinklaw, a public relations person at Chevron in San Ramon, was not available on Friday. Now,  let’s turn to the question: Why aren’t more carmakers advertising their battery electric vehicles or plug-in electric models on TV? The answer may be hidden in what kinds of autos they DO advertise. Usually, these are higher-priced luxury cars running on fossil fuels, including SUVs and pickups, models with poor gas mileage and most importantly, high markups. Buying a pickup truck to ride in the city is ludicrous. It’s also bad for the environment. Here are some mpg numbers from popular pickups I grabbed from Car & Driver and Consumer Reports: Nissan Frontier: 17 mpg Chevrolet Colorado ZR2: 17 mpg Ford Ranger XLT: 20 mpg Toyota Tacoma SR5 V6: 19 mpg Ford F-150 XLT 2.7 EcoBoost: 19 mpg More gas-guzzling autos are robbing our children of a livable planet. They are also adding to the bad air we breathe. If you don’t care about the environment, think about your wallet. Gasoline prices are set to rise July 1 by 5.6 cents as the second round of a California gas tax for repairing roads kicks in. The amount of money you would save from a car with superior gas mileage is substantial. Better, driving an electric vehicle saves you even more money. Fueling up an ICE car that gets 30 mpg at a cost of $3.49 per gallon at 50 miles per day is about $2,124 per year. The cost of plugging in an electric car is $744 a year. And if you install solar and use the sun’s power to charge your EV, that drops it to $307 a year. Plus, you save by never having to get tune-ups, oil changes, transmission fixes, etc. because EVs have fewer moving parts. A Facebook group of EV owners discusses the lack of TV ads for Chevy Bolts (an electric vehicle with 238 miles per charge), Volts (a unique plug-in which gets around 60 miles on a charge plus a gasoline-engine boost that adds about 324 miles.) Some say Chevy believe smarter shoppers don’t need ads: They look online for EVs or shop by word of mouth. Audi does run TV commercials for its all-electric e-tron (204 miles per charge). The ad attempts to slay myths about electric cars: They’re slow; there’s no charging stations; they don’t go far. Car and Driver writer George Levy quotes Loren Angelo, VP of marketing for Audi of America, explaining a long-term strategy. Starting in 2025, Audi will make only electric cars. “As part of our commitment to electrification, we’ve recognized the need for more consumer education on what it really means to go electric,” Angelo said. Elvis Barksdale of the FB group chides Chevy. “Now is the time for GM to tell the buyers they are the leader. We own 2 Volts. People still tell me they have never heard of them,” he wrote. People still ask to me to explain my Volt to them. It’s been out since 2013. It’s like explaining a smart phone to my 88-year-old mother. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links How much can electric cars impact climate change? New report says a lot Edison says California needs one-quarter of its vehicles to be electric to meet climate change goals With electric cars available, the question arises: Why don’t you drive one? These researchers want California to be a global advocate about climate change With gas prices rising, sales of cheaper, ethanol-blended fuels are surging in California [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Electric car owner Robert Dickson, 63, of Glendora drives his 2017 Chevy Bolt EV which can go about 240 miles on a charge during celebration of National Drive Electric Week at The Center for Environmental Research and Technology at UC Riverside Sept. 10, 2017. (photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG.) More ads can’t hurt. But without more government help and more charging stations, U.S. consumers may continue to buy internal combustion engine pickups and SUVs because they drive automaker profits. And oil companies can still tout nonsense claims that keep the public blind to the real news: Electrification of automobiles is the future. Not some dancing hula girl. Steve Scauzillo covers public health, environment and transportation for the Southern California News Group. He’s a recipient of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @stevscaz or email him at sscauzillo@scng.com.
21 Jun 19
Daily News
I watch a lot of sports on TV: baseball, college basketball, tennis and soccer, as examples. Hence, my living room is inundated with a busload of TV commercials for new automobiles as well as oil company products. My sons love to pick apart commercials that make no sense or frankly, do not tell the whole truth. And both automakers and oil companies lead the way in the doublespeak category. Many oil companies, Arco and Chevron for example, make the claim: No other gasoline gets you better gas mileage. Examine that statement. Of course not! All other petroleum products are basically the same: None of the “Top Tier” [cq comment=”added”]variety provides better mpg or worse mpg, just the same. Instead of new information, Arco ads give you a dancing hula girl who magically jumps off your dashboard into your engine, making her hair stand on end. So? Is this supposed to make me buy Arco gasoline? Using cute, animated cars (usually with a female voice), Chevron says their “Techron” additive cleans your engine and therefore, if you use Chevron “Top Tier gas” you will get a cleaner internal combustion engine and better gas mileage. A recent AAA study says additives in “Top Tier” gas do clean carbon deposits “known to reduce fuel economy,” but the benefit is not exclusive to one brand. Chevron gasoline is not the only gasoline containing additives and rated by the government as “Top Tier.” Clark.com, an energy newsletter that examines oil company claims, lists more than 50 retailers across the United States selling “Top Tier” licensed gasoline (yes, the government certifies these). Besides Arco and Chevron, these include BP, CITGO, 76, Exxon, Mobil, Phillips 66, Shell, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero. Even you patient folks who wait in line at the Costco to fill up are getting certified Top Tier gas. The folks at Clark.com point out the ads are a marketing strategy to get you to buy Chevron and to think it’s the only one with the additive. A recent study found “you can have what the study finds is the best gas at the lowest prices.” In short, Chevron and others are using the strategy as a way to say their gasoline is better than other “Top Tier” rated gasoline, a questionable claim. [cq comment=”i added this to make it more clear”] Morgan Crinklaw, a public relations person at Chevron in San Ramon, was not available on Friday. Now,  let’s turn to the question: Why aren’t more carmakers advertising their battery electric vehicles or plug-in electric models on TV? The answer may be hidden in what kinds of autos they DO advertise. Usually, these are higher-priced luxury cars running on fossil fuels, including SUVs and pickups, models with poor gas mileage and most importantly, high markups. Buying a pickup truck to ride in the city is ludicrous. It’s also bad for the environment. Here are some mpg numbers from popular pickups I grabbed from Car & Driver and Consumer Reports: Nissan Frontier: 17 mpg Chevrolet Colorado ZR2: 17 mpg Ford Ranger XLT: 20 mpg Toyota Tacoma SR5 V6: 19 mpg Ford F-150 XLT 2.7 EcoBoost: 19 mpg More gas-guzzling autos are robbing our children of a livable planet. They are also adding to the bad air we breathe. If you don’t care about the environment, think about your wallet. Gasoline prices are set to rise July 1 by 5.6 cents as the second round of a California gas tax for repairing roads kicks in. The amount of money you would save from a car with superior gas mileage is substantial. Better, driving an electric vehicle saves you even more money. Fueling up an ICE car that gets 30 mpg at a cost of $3.49 per gallon at 50 miles per day is about $2,124 per year. The cost of plugging in an electric car is $744 a year. And if you install solar and use the sun’s power to charge your EV, that drops it to $307 a year. Plus, you save by never having to get tune-ups, oil changes, transmission fixes, etc. because EVs have fewer moving parts. A Facebook group of EV owners discusses the lack of TV ads for Chevy Bolts (an electric vehicle with 238 miles per charge), Volts (a unique plug-in which gets around 60 miles on a charge plus a gasoline-engine boost that adds about 324 miles.) Some say Chevy believe smarter shoppers don’t need ads: They look online for EVs or shop by word of mouth. Audi does run TV commercials for its all-electric e-tron (204 miles per charge). The ad attempts to slay myths about electric cars: They’re slow; there’s no charging stations; they don’t go far. Car and Driver writer George Levy quotes Loren Angelo, VP of marketing for Audi of America, explaining a long-term strategy. Starting in 2025, Audi will make only electric cars. “As part of our commitment to electrification, we’ve recognized the need for more consumer education on what it really means to go electric,” Angelo said. Elvis Barksdale of the FB group chides Chevy. “Now is the time for GM to tell the buyers they are the leader. We own 2 Volts. People still tell me they have never heard of them,” he wrote. People still ask to me to explain my Volt to them. It’s been out since 2013. It’s like explaining a smart phone to my 88-year-old mother. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links How much can electric cars impact climate change? New report says a lot Edison says California needs one-quarter of its vehicles to be electric to meet climate change goals With electric cars available, the question arises: Why don’t you drive one? These researchers want California to be a global advocate about climate change With gas prices rising, sales of cheaper, ethanol-blended fuels are surging in California [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Electric car owner Robert Dickson, 63, of Glendora drives his 2017 Chevy Bolt EV which can go about 240 miles on a charge during celebration of National Drive Electric Week at The Center for Environmental Research and Technology at UC Riverside Sept. 10, 2017. (photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG.) More ads can’t hurt. But without more government help and more charging stations, U.S. consumers may continue to buy internal combustion engine pickups and SUVs because they drive automaker profits. And oil companies can still tout nonsense claims that keep the public blind to the real news: Electrification of automobiles is the future. Not some dancing hula girl. Steve Scauzillo covers public health, environment and transportation for the Southern California News Group. He’s a recipient of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @stevscaz or email him at sscauzillo@scng.com.
21 Jun 19
Whittier Daily News
I watch a lot of sports on TV: baseball, college basketball, tennis and soccer, as examples. Hence, my living room is inundated with a busload of TV commercials for new automobiles as well as oil company products. My sons love to pick apart commercials that make no sense or frankly, do not tell the whole truth. And both automakers and oil companies lead the way in the doublespeak category. Many oil companies, Arco and Chevron for example, make the claim: No other gasoline gets you better gas mileage. Examine that statement. Of course not! All other petroleum products are basically the same: None of the “Top Tier” [cq comment=”added”]variety provides better mpg or worse mpg, just the same. Instead of new information, Arco ads give you a dancing hula girl who magically jumps off your dashboard into your engine, making her hair stand on end. So? Is this supposed to make me buy Arco gasoline? Using cute, animated cars (usually with a female voice), Chevron says their “Techron” additive cleans your engine and therefore, if you use Chevron “Top Tier gas” you will get a cleaner internal combustion engine and better gas mileage. A recent AAA study says additives in “Top Tier” gas do clean carbon deposits “known to reduce fuel economy,” but the benefit is not exclusive to one brand. Chevron gasoline is not the only gasoline containing additives and rated by the government as “Top Tier.” Clark.com, an energy newsletter that examines oil company claims, lists more than 50 retailers across the United States selling “Top Tier” licensed gasoline (yes, the government certifies these). Besides Arco and Chevron, these include BP, CITGO, 76, Exxon, Mobil, Phillips 66, Shell, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero. Even you patient folks who wait in line at the Costco to fill up are getting certified Top Tier gas. The folks at Clark.com point out the ads are a marketing strategy to get you to buy Chevron and to think it’s the only one with the additive. A recent study found “you can have what the study finds is the best gas at the lowest prices.” In short, Chevron and others are using the strategy as a way to say their gasoline is better than other “Top Tier” rated gasoline, a questionable claim. [cq comment=”i added this to make it more clear”] Morgan Crinklaw, a public relations person at Chevron in San Ramon, was not available on Friday. Now,  let’s turn to the question: Why aren’t more carmakers advertising their battery electric vehicles or plug-in electric models on TV? The answer may be hidden in what kinds of autos they DO advertise. Usually, these are higher-priced luxury cars running on fossil fuels, including SUVs and pickups, models with poor gas mileage and most importantly, high markups. Buying a pickup truck to ride in the city is ludicrous. It’s also bad for the environment. Here are some mpg numbers from popular pickups I grabbed from Car & Driver and Consumer Reports: Nissan Frontier: 17 mpg Chevrolet Colorado ZR2: 17 mpg Ford Ranger XLT: 20 mpg Toyota Tacoma SR5 V6: 19 mpg Ford F-150 XLT 2.7 EcoBoost: 19 mpg More gas-guzzling autos are robbing our children of a livable planet. They are also adding to the bad air we breathe. If you don’t care about the environment, think about your wallet. Gasoline prices are set to rise July 1 by 5.6 cents as the second round of a California gas tax for repairing roads kicks in. The amount of money you would save from a car with superior gas mileage is substantial. Better, driving an electric vehicle saves you even more money. Fueling up an ICE car that gets 30 mpg at a cost of $3.49 per gallon at 50 miles per day is about $2,124 per year. The cost of plugging in an electric car is $744 a year. And if you install solar and use the sun’s power to charge your EV, that drops it to $307 a year. Plus, you save by never having to get tune-ups, oil changes, transmission fixes, etc. because EVs have fewer moving parts. A Facebook group of EV owners discusses the lack of TV ads for Chevy Bolts (an electric vehicle with 238 miles per charge), Volts (a unique plug-in which gets around 60 miles on a charge plus a gasoline-engine boost that adds about 324 miles.) Some say Chevy believe smarter shoppers don’t need ads: They look online for EVs or shop by word of mouth. Audi does run TV commercials for its all-electric e-tron (204 miles per charge). The ad attempts to slay myths about electric cars: They’re slow; there’s no charging stations; they don’t go far. Car and Driver writer George Levy quotes Loren Angelo, VP of marketing for Audi of America, explaining a long-term strategy. Starting in 2025, Audi will make only electric cars. “As part of our commitment to electrification, we’ve recognized the need for more consumer education on what it really means to go electric,” Angelo said. Elvis Barksdale of the FB group chides Chevy. “Now is the time for GM to tell the buyers they are the leader. We own 2 Volts. People still tell me they have never heard of them,” he wrote. People still ask to me to explain my Volt to them. It’s been out since 2013. It’s like explaining a smart phone to my 88-year-old mother. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links How much can electric cars impact climate change? New report says a lot Edison says California needs one-quarter of its vehicles to be electric to meet climate change goals With electric cars available, the question arises: Why don’t you drive one? These researchers want California to be a global advocate about climate change With gas prices rising, sales of cheaper, ethanol-blended fuels are surging in California [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Electric car owner Robert Dickson, 63, of Glendora drives his 2017 Chevy Bolt EV which can go about 240 miles on a charge during celebration of National Drive Electric Week at The Center for Environmental Research and Technology at UC Riverside Sept. 10, 2017. (photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG.) More ads can’t hurt. But without more government help and more charging stations, U.S. consumers may continue to buy internal combustion engine pickups and SUVs because they drive automaker profits. And oil companies can still tout nonsense claims that keep the public blind to the real news: Electrification of automobiles is the future. Not some dancing hula girl. Steve Scauzillo covers public health, environment and transportation for the Southern California News Group. He’s a recipient of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @stevscaz or email him at sscauzillo@scng.com.
21 Jun 19
Pasadena Star News
I watch a lot of sports on TV: baseball, college basketball, tennis and soccer, as examples. Hence, my living room is inundated with a busload of TV commercials for new automobiles as well as oil company products. My sons love to pick apart commercials that make no sense or frankly, do not tell the whole truth. And both automakers and oil companies lead the way in the doublespeak category. Many oil companies, Arco and Chevron for example, make the claim: No other gasoline gets you better gas mileage. Examine that statement. Of course not! All other petroleum products are basically the same: None of the “Top Tier” [cq comment=”added”]variety provides better mpg or worse mpg, just the same. Instead of new information, Arco ads give you a dancing hula girl who magically jumps off your dashboard into your engine, making her hair stand on end. So? Is this supposed to make me buy Arco gasoline? Using cute, animated cars (usually with a female voice), Chevron says their “Techron” additive cleans your engine and therefore, if you use Chevron “Top Tier gas” you will get a cleaner internal combustion engine and better gas mileage. A recent AAA study says additives in “Top Tier” gas do clean carbon deposits “known to reduce fuel economy,” but the benefit is not exclusive to one brand. Chevron gasoline is not the only gasoline containing additives and rated by the government as “Top Tier.” Clark.com, an energy newsletter that examines oil company claims, lists more than 50 retailers across the United States selling “Top Tier” licensed gasoline (yes, the government certifies these). Besides Arco and Chevron, these include BP, CITGO, 76, Exxon, Mobil, Phillips 66, Shell, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero. Even you patient folks who wait in line at the Costco to fill up are getting certified Top Tier gas. The folks at Clark.com point out the ads are a marketing strategy to get you to buy Chevron and to think it’s the only one with the additive. A recent study found “you can have what the study finds is the best gas at the lowest prices.” In short, Chevron and others are using the strategy as a way to say their gasoline is better than other “Top Tier” rated gasoline, a questionable claim. [cq comment=”i added this to make it more clear”] Morgan Crinklaw, a public relations person at Chevron in San Ramon, was not available on Friday. Now,  let’s turn to the question: Why aren’t more carmakers advertising their battery electric vehicles or plug-in electric models on TV? The answer may be hidden in what kinds of autos they DO advertise. Usually, these are higher-priced luxury cars running on fossil fuels, including SUVs and pickups, models with poor gas mileage and most importantly, high markups. Buying a pickup truck to ride in the city is ludicrous. It’s also bad for the environment. Here are some mpg numbers from popular pickups I grabbed from Car & Driver and Consumer Reports: Nissan Frontier: 17 mpg Chevrolet Colorado ZR2: 17 mpg Ford Ranger XLT: 20 mpg Toyota Tacoma SR5 V6: 19 mpg Ford F-150 XLT 2.7 EcoBoost: 19 mpg More gas-guzzling autos are robbing our children of a livable planet. They are also adding to the bad air we breathe. If you don’t care about the environment, think about your wallet. Gasoline prices are set to rise July 1 by 5.6 cents as the second round of a California gas tax for repairing roads kicks in. The amount of money you would save from a car with superior gas mileage is substantial. Better, driving an electric vehicle saves you even more money. Fueling up an ICE car that gets 30 mpg at a cost of $3.49 per gallon at 50 miles per day is about $2,124 per year. The cost of plugging in an electric car is $744 a year. And if you install solar and use the sun’s power to charge your EV, that drops it to $307 a year. Plus, you save by never having to get tune-ups, oil changes, transmission fixes, etc. because EVs have fewer moving parts. A Facebook group of EV owners discusses the lack of TV ads for Chevy Bolts (an electric vehicle with 238 miles per charge), Volts (a unique plug-in which gets around 60 miles on a charge plus a gasoline-engine boost that adds about 324 miles.) Some say Chevy believe smarter shoppers don’t need ads: They look online for EVs or shop by word of mouth. Audi does run TV commercials for its all-electric e-tron (204 miles per charge). The ad attempts to slay myths about electric cars: They’re slow; there’s no charging stations; they don’t go far. Car and Driver writer George Levy quotes Loren Angelo, VP of marketing for Audi of America, explaining a long-term strategy. Starting in 2025, Audi will make only electric cars. “As part of our commitment to electrification, we’ve recognized the need for more consumer education on what it really means to go electric,” Angelo said. Elvis Barksdale of the FB group chides Chevy. “Now is the time for GM to tell the buyers they are the leader. We own 2 Volts. People still tell me they have never heard of them,” he wrote. People still ask to me to explain my Volt to them. It’s been out since 2013. It’s like explaining a smart phone to my 88-year-old mother. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links How much can electric cars impact climate change? New report says a lot Edison says California needs one-quarter of its vehicles to be electric to meet climate change goals With electric cars available, the question arises: Why don’t you drive one? These researchers want California to be a global advocate about climate change With gas prices rising, sales of cheaper, ethanol-blended fuels are surging in California [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Electric car owner Robert Dickson, 63, of Glendora drives his 2017 Chevy Bolt EV which can go about 240 miles on a charge during celebration of National Drive Electric Week at The Center for Environmental Research and Technology at UC Riverside Sept. 10, 2017. (photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG.) More ads can’t hurt. But without more government help and more charging stations, U.S. consumers may continue to buy internal combustion engine pickups and SUVs because they drive automaker profits. And oil companies can still tout nonsense claims that keep the public blind to the real news: Electrification of automobiles is the future. Not some dancing hula girl. Steve Scauzillo covers public health, environment and transportation for the Southern California News Group. He’s a recipient of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @stevscaz or email him at sscauzillo@scng.com.
21 Jun 19
Daily Breeze
I watch a lot of sports on TV: baseball, college basketball, tennis and soccer, as examples. Hence, my living room is inundated with a busload of TV commercials for new automobiles as well as oil company products. My sons love to pick apart commercials that make no sense or frankly, do not tell the whole truth. And both automakers and oil companies lead the way in the doublespeak category. Many oil companies, Arco and Chevron for example, make the claim: No other gasoline gets you better gas mileage. Examine that statement. Of course not! All other petroleum products are basically the same: None of the “Top Tier” [cq comment=”added”]variety provides better mpg or worse mpg, just the same. Instead of new information, Arco ads give you a dancing hula girl who magically jumps off your dashboard into your engine, making her hair stand on end. So? Is this supposed to make me buy Arco gasoline? Using cute, animated cars (usually with a female voice), Chevron says their “Techron” additive cleans your engine and therefore, if you use Chevron “Top Tier gas” you will get a cleaner internal combustion engine and better gas mileage. A recent AAA study says additives in “Top Tier” gas do clean carbon deposits “known to reduce fuel economy,” but the benefit is not exclusive to one brand. Chevron gasoline is not the only gasoline containing additives and rated by the government as “Top Tier.” Clark.com, an energy newsletter that examines oil company claims, lists more than 50 retailers across the United States selling “Top Tier” licensed gasoline (yes, the government certifies these). Besides Arco and Chevron, these include BP, CITGO, 76, Exxon, Mobil, Phillips 66, Shell, Sunoco, Texaco and Valero. Even you patient folks who wait in line at the Costco to fill up are getting certified Top Tier gas. The folks at Clark.com point out the ads are a marketing strategy to get you to buy Chevron and to think it’s the only one with the additive. A recent study found “you can have what the study finds is the best gas at the lowest prices.” In short, Chevron and others are using the strategy as a way to say their gasoline is better than other “Top Tier” rated gasoline, a questionable claim. [cq comment=”i added this to make it more clear”] Morgan Crinklaw, a public relations person at Chevron in San Ramon, was not available on Friday. Now,  let’s turn to the question: Why aren’t more carmakers advertising their battery electric vehicles or plug-in electric models on TV? The answer may be hidden in what kinds of autos they DO advertise. Usually, these are higher-priced luxury cars running on fossil fuels, including SUVs and pickups, models with poor gas mileage and most importantly, high markups. Buying a pickup truck to ride in the city is ludicrous. It’s also bad for the environment. Here are some mpg numbers from popular pickups I grabbed from Car & Driver and Consumer Reports: Nissan Frontier: 17 mpg Chevrolet Colorado ZR2: 17 mpg Ford Ranger XLT: 20 mpg Toyota Tacoma SR5 V6: 19 mpg Ford F-150 XLT 2.7 EcoBoost: 19 mpg More gas-guzzling autos are robbing our children of a livable planet. They are also adding to the bad air we breathe. If you don’t care about the environment, think about your wallet. Gasoline prices are set to rise July 1 by 5.6 cents as the second round of a California gas tax for repairing roads kicks in. The amount of money you would save from a car with superior gas mileage is substantial. Better, driving an electric vehicle saves you even more money. Fueling up an ICE car that gets 30 mpg at a cost of $3.49 per gallon at 50 miles per day is about $2,124 per year. The cost of plugging in an electric car is $744 a year. And if you install solar and use the sun’s power to charge your EV, that drops it to $307 a year. Plus, you save by never having to get tune-ups, oil changes, transmission fixes, etc. because EVs have fewer moving parts. A Facebook group of EV owners discusses the lack of TV ads for Chevy Bolts (an electric vehicle with 238 miles per charge), Volts (a unique plug-in which gets around 60 miles on a charge plus a gasoline-engine boost that adds about 324 miles.) Some say Chevy believe smarter shoppers don’t need ads: They look online for EVs or shop by word of mouth. Audi does run TV commercials for its all-electric e-tron (204 miles per charge). The ad attempts to slay myths about electric cars: They’re slow; there’s no charging stations; they don’t go far. Car and Driver writer George Levy quotes Loren Angelo, VP of marketing for Audi of America, explaining a long-term strategy. Starting in 2025, Audi will make only electric cars. “As part of our commitment to electrification, we’ve recognized the need for more consumer education on what it really means to go electric,” Angelo said. Elvis Barksdale of the FB group chides Chevy. “Now is the time for GM to tell the buyers they are the leader. We own 2 Volts. People still tell me they have never heard of them,” he wrote. People still ask to me to explain my Volt to them. It’s been out since 2013. It’s like explaining a smart phone to my 88-year-old mother. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links How much can electric cars impact climate change? New report says a lot Edison says California needs one-quarter of its vehicles to be electric to meet climate change goals With electric cars available, the question arises: Why don’t you drive one? These researchers want California to be a global advocate about climate change With gas prices rising, sales of cheaper, ethanol-blended fuels are surging in California [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Electric car owner Robert Dickson, 63, of Glendora drives his 2017 Chevy Bolt EV which can go about 240 miles on a charge during celebration of National Drive Electric Week at The Center for Environmental Research and Technology at UC Riverside Sept. 10, 2017. (photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG.) More ads can’t hurt. But without more government help and more charging stations, U.S. consumers may continue to buy internal combustion engine pickups and SUVs because they drive automaker profits. And oil companies can still tout nonsense claims that keep the public blind to the real news: Electrification of automobiles is the future. Not some dancing hula girl. Steve Scauzillo covers public health, environment and transportation for the Southern California News Group. He’s a recipient of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @stevscaz or email him at sscauzillo@scng.com.