Rubies Costumes

23 Feb 19
Hollywood Life

Offset and Cardi B’s baby daughter Kulture is rap royalty, and looked like a queen on the cover of his debut solo album ‘Father of 4,’ We’ve got details on the $6K crown and headpiece she rocked straight from the designer herself.

23 Feb 19
Skye M

Biracial: concerning or containing members of two racial groups. Cosplay: combination of word costume and play; practice of dressing up as a character from a source of media that originated from Japan. Black History Month: annual observance of remembering important people and events in history of African diaspora during February. What do these all  have […]

23 Feb 19
SCNG
A poised 10-year-old girl donning a ’60s-style navy blue cardigan, horn-rimmed glasses and a NASA ID badge, pointed to a coffee pot labeled “colored.” “I work like a dog, day and night, living off of coffee from a pot none of you want to touch,” said the doppelganger of Katherine Johnson, the famous NASA mathematician. “So, excuse me if I have to use the restroom a few times a day. “That’s the answer I gave my boss when he asked why it takes me so long to go to the bathroom.” The half-pint version of Johnson was actually Zion Traylor, a 5th-grade student at Birney Elementary in Long Beach Unified’s first “Black History Living Museum,” on Thursday, Feb. 21. Traylor portrayed Johnson, who became the student’s hero after watching the 2016 film “Hidden Figures.” Legendary African American figures, activists and scholars – including Olympian Wilma Rudolph and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall – graced the living museum at the Long Beach Unified School District’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill, in honor of Black History Month. The 15-some stars of African American history described their lives, accomplishments and contributions to society. For Traylor, the museum project helped her learn a lot more about the person she already looked up to. “Katherine is my hero because when times were tough for her and when she was being treated unfairly, she never gave up and kept trying,” she said. “She changed history and treated people with kindness, even when they were being rude and unfair to her.” #gallery-1644145-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1644145-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1644145-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1644145-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Fifth grader Zion Traylor embodies NASA mathematician Katherin Johnson as she tells her story at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Madison John, a 3rd grader, portrays Olympian Wilma Rudolph at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Madison John, a 3rd grader, reads her speech about Olympian Wilma Rudolph at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Azaan Tabari, a 7th grader, portrays Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fourth grader Lyrick Barber gets in full character as Robert Smalls at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Smalls, an escaped slave and a Civil War hero, served five terms in the U.S. House, representing a South Carolina district described as a “black paradise” because of its abundant political opportunities for freedmen. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fifth grader Zion Traylor embodies NASA mathematician Katherin Johnson as she tells her story at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fourth grader Lyrick Barber gets in full character as Robert Smalls at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fifth grader Steven Barker portrays Nat Turner at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) First grader Mark Barker portrays George Washington Carver at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Second grader Miles Sawyer Luong gets set to tell visitors about his character, writer/activist Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fifth grader Steven Barker portrays Nat Turner at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Pam Luckey listens to Marcus Dear’s living history presentation of Thomas L. Jennings at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Pierre Brouard gathers information about Benjamin Banneker at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Students gathered for an assembly at Westerly School of Long Beach to kick off a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Veronica Escobar listens to Alice Halls’s living history presentation of Maya Angelou at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Noah Furlow presents a living history presentation of NFL athlete Warrick Dunn at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Students gather information at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Students gather information at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) “When people walk around, (the students) assume the role of their African American hero and they talk about their accomplishments, what they’ve done, if they’ve won awards or if they’ve created things,” said Kimberly Johnson, LBUSD administrative assistant. Westerly School in Long Beach, an independent K-8 school, also hosted a living museum of their own on Thursday. Their museum, which the school’s hosted for at least five years, featured about 20 fifth-graders who “channeled” figures including activist and poet Maya Angelou and former NFL running back Warrick Dunn. The rest of the school participated in Black History-related activities, such as learning about the geography of Africa, said Lauren Plant, head of the school. “To be able to represent multiple perspectives, to have students read, learn and hear from figures about ideas and movements they haven’t been exposed to before was really magical and moving to see,” she said. Parents and leaders at Long Beach Unified’s living museum – hosted by the Coalition of Involved African American parents – shared similar sentiments. Many said it was a fun and creative way to celebrate Black History Month. The students – from a variety of schools and grades – chose their favorite hero in African American history, did research, and presented the figure’s history in the first person. Each student also creates a poster board with pictures, facts and quotes from the historical figure. Other notable figures were Nat Turner and George Washington Carver, portrayed by brothers Steven Barker, 10, and Mark Barker, 7, respectively. Steven said he chose Turner, who led one of the largest rebellions in the United States, because he’s brave. “I led a two-day rebellion against slave owners,” he said. Their mother, Denise Barker, said the hands-on project was a great way for her sons to become more interested in African American history. She made the costumes – complete with stick-on mustaches. “This definitely engaged them more because they were really looking forward to this, they’ve been really excited about this – getting the outfits together and trying to match them with the pictures,” she said. Adults also learned at the event. Grandmother Bobbi Williams said she was surprised to see how much the children knew. Her granddaughter, Pheonix Richardson, portrayed Ruby Bridges – who, at 6, became the first child to integrate into a white school in the south. “I was really surprised because I honestly didn’t remember who Ruby Bridges was,” Williams. “Until she started telling me about her, and I was like ‘Oh yeah,’ so I thought that was awesome.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Richardson took her role seriously, telling the story about Bridges going to school for the first time and how she persisted, despite racism impacting her family. “I love to go to school and I love to learn,” Richardson, 10, said. “And I wanted to know who helped me go to school and how they were able to go to a first white school.” Williams echoed other family members, who said the living museum will resonate with their children for the rest of their lives. “She’s never going to forget that girl,” Williams said. “She’ll always remember who Ruby Bridges is and how she gave her the advantage of being able to attend a school that was integrated. This is a very good experience for her.” Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
22 Feb 19
Meet Me at the Soda Fountain

“It’s the Depression, dearie.”  “We’re in the money!” Ginger Rogers sings during the opening of this extravagant musical, but when she starts warbling the song in Pig Latin, we know she’s just being tongue-in-cheek, particularly when the sheriff and his deputies interrupt the show to collect on the producer’s unpaid bills (“Ain’t you goin’ to […]

22 Feb 19
Toygle

Snitch which every Quidditch Seeker must try to capture
US designed and sized product
Rubie’s official licensed product tested to EU regulations

22 Feb 19
Angie's Studio Starz

It’s almost time for our Annual Starz Showcase/Dress Rehearsal. When: Saturday, March 2nd, 2019 Where: Peine Ridge Elementary School 1107 Peine Rd. Wentzville, MO 63385 Time: 5:00-8:30 p.m. This is a MANDATORY event and a great opportunity for the students to perform their competitive pieces before we hit the competition stage. This will take place […]

22 Feb 19
Vintage Stardust

Despite excitement for the Academy’s upcoming museum projected to open this year, there’s going to be a valuable collection missing. I’ve never forgotten the efforts of Debbie Reynolds. She was very passionate about film history, beginning when many of the cast and crew of the eras she was eager to preserve were still alive. Many […]

23 Feb 19
Press Telegram
A poised 10-year-old girl donning a ’60s-style navy blue cardigan, horn-rimmed glasses and a NASA ID badge, pointed to a coffee pot labeled “colored.” “I work like a dog, day and night, living off of coffee from a pot none of you want to touch,” said the doppelganger of Katherine Johnson, the famous NASA mathematician. “So, excuse me if I have to use the restroom a few times a day. “That’s the answer I gave my boss when he asked why it takes me so long to go to the bathroom.” The half-pint version of Johnson was actually Zion Traylor, a 5th-grade student at Birney Elementary in Long Beach Unified’s first “Black History Living Museum,” on Thursday, Feb. 21. Traylor portrayed Johnson, who became the student’s hero after watching the 2016 film “Hidden Figures.” Legendary African American figures, activists and scholars – including Olympian Wilma Rudolph and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall – graced the living museum at the Long Beach Unified School District’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill, in honor of Black History Month. The 15-some stars of African American history described their lives, accomplishments and contributions to society. For Traylor, the museum project helped her learn a lot more about the person she already looked up to. “Katherine is my hero because when times were tough for her and when she was being treated unfairly, she never gave up and kept trying,” she said. “She changed history and treated people with kindness, even when they were being rude and unfair to her.” #gallery-2102403-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2102403-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2102403-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2102403-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Fifth grader Zion Traylor embodies NASA mathematician Katherin Johnson as she tells her story at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Madison John, a 3rd grader, portrays Olympian Wilma Rudolph at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Madison John, a 3rd grader, reads her speech about Olympian Wilma Rudolph at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Azaan Tabari, a 7th grader, portrays Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fourth grader Lyrick Barber gets in full character as Robert Smalls at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Smalls, an escaped slave and a Civil War hero, served five terms in the U.S. House, representing a South Carolina district described as a “black paradise” because of its abundant political opportunities for freedmen. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fifth grader Zion Traylor embodies NASA mathematician Katherin Johnson as she tells her story at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fourth grader Lyrick Barber gets in full character as Robert Smalls at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fifth grader Steven Barker portrays Nat Turner at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) First grader Mark Barker portrays George Washington Carver at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Second grader Miles Sawyer Luong gets set to tell visitors about his character, writer/activist Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Fifth grader Steven Barker portrays Nat Turner at LBUSD’s Teacher Resource Center in Signal Hill on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Several students from throughout the school district donned costumes as they portrayed prominent historical African-American figures. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) Pam Luckey listens to Marcus Dear’s living history presentation of Thomas L. Jennings at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Pierre Brouard gathers information about Benjamin Banneker at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Students gathered for an assembly at Westerly School of Long Beach to kick off a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Veronica Escobar listens to Alice Halls’s living history presentation of Maya Angelou at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Noah Furlow presents a living history presentation of NFL athlete Warrick Dunn at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Students gather information at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Students gather information at Westerly School of Long Beach during a school-wide “Black History Museum” in Long Beach on Thursday, February 21, 2019. Students parents and faculty were able to walk the halls learning about key figures in African American and black American history in honor of Black History Month. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) “When people walk around, (the students) assume the role of their African American hero and they talk about their accomplishments, what they’ve done, if they’ve won awards or if they’ve created things,” said Kimberly Johnson, LBUSD administrative assistant. Westerly School in Long Beach, an independent K-8 school, also hosted a living museum of their own on Thursday. Their museum, which the school’s hosted for at least five years, featured about 20 fifth-graders who “channeled” figures including activist and poet Maya Angelou and former NFL running back Warrick Dunn. The rest of the school participated in Black History-related activities, such as learning about the geography of Africa, said Lauren Plant, head of the school. “To be able to represent multiple perspectives, to have students read, learn and hear from figures about ideas and movements they haven’t been exposed to before was really magical and moving to see,” she said. Parents and leaders at Long Beach Unified’s living museum – hosted by the Coalition of Involved African American parents – shared similar sentiments. Many said it was a fun and creative way to celebrate Black History Month. The students – from a variety of schools and grades – chose their favorite hero in African American history, did research, and presented the figure’s history in the first person. Each student also creates a poster board with pictures, facts and quotes from the historical figure. Other notable figures were Nat Turner and George Washington Carver, portrayed by brothers Steven Barker, 10, and Mark Barker, 7, respectively. Steven said he chose Turner, who led one of the largest rebellions in the United States, because he’s brave. “I led a two-day rebellion against slave owners,” he said. Their mother, Denise Barker, said the hands-on project was a great way for her sons to become more interested in African American history. She made the costumes – complete with stick-on mustaches. “This definitely engaged them more because they were really looking forward to this, they’ve been really excited about this – getting the outfits together and trying to match them with the pictures,” she said. Adults also learned at the event. Grandmother Bobbi Williams said she was surprised to see how much the children knew. Her granddaughter, Pheonix Richardson, portrayed Ruby Bridges – who, at 6, became the first child to integrate into a white school in the south. “I was really surprised because I honestly didn’t remember who Ruby Bridges was,” Williams. “Until she started telling me about her, and I was like ‘Oh yeah,’ so I thought that was awesome.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Richardson took her role seriously, telling the story about Bridges going to school for the first time and how she persisted, despite racism impacting her family. “I love to go to school and I love to learn,” Richardson, 10, said. “And I wanted to know who helped me go to school and how they were able to go to a first white school.” Williams echoed other family members, who said the living museum will resonate with their children for the rest of their lives. “She’s never going to forget that girl,” Williams said. “She’ll always remember who Ruby Bridges is and how she gave her the advantage of being able to attend a school that was integrated. This is a very good experience for her.” Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
22 Feb 19
Toygle

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22 Feb 19
Lil Niki, Big World

I’ll start this off with an apology for my tardiness. I got back to campus Sunday evening and school just like decided to be a thing this week and what a freaking beast it was. But nonetheless, I’ve also been anxiously waiting for a break to be able to sit down and finally write about […]

22 Feb 19
Virtual Jo-salty spaces-inbetween places-eudaemonic traces

“It’s kind of fun to do the impossible. Life is composed of lights & shadows…we would be untruthful…if we tried to pretend there were no shadows.” Walt Disney You’ll think you’ve heard this story before, or watched a dozen movies with a similar plot. It’s unlikely you have, unless you were part of the Baker’s […]

22 Feb 19
Ruby Red Romance Review

Breaking the Billionaire’s Rules by Annika Martin Release Date: February 19th Breaking a Billionaire’s Rules, a laugh-out-loud romantic comedy by New York Times bestselling author Annika Martin Max Hilton is my high school nemesis turned billionaire. And tomorrow I deliver his lunch order. In a cat costume. You know he’s going to love it. He’ll […]

21 Feb 19
Archy news nety

Life as a superhero * can be exhausting and exhausting: constantly criminals are beaten, monsters are chased away, corruption is uncovered and fights are fought – of course always in the name of justice and for the benefit of all humankind, of course But what do superheroes actually do when they are free, when they […]

21 Feb 19
buy superhero costumes

Harley Quinn discovers her origins in the Batman animated series. Before that, she wasn’t also a c.omic book personality but her appeal was so high that DC needed to add her to their anti-villain lineup. Should you liked this article in addition to you would want to be given more information relating to star lord […]

21 Feb 19
Boston Herald
#gallery-1561230-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1561230-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1561230-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1561230-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Charlize Theron arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party on Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP) Jennifer Lopez arrives during the 82nd Academy Awards Sunday, March 7, 2010, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles) Emma Stone arrives at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP) Brie Larson poses in the press room with the award for best actress in a leading role for “Room” at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) One thing is for sure: There are some changes in store at this year’s Academy Awards ceremony on Sunday. For starters, there’s no official host this year. And the powers that be have gone back and forth about which awards they’re going to air on camera at all. But what about the red carpet — will the pre-show looks and interviews have an added pressure to shore up the rest of the show’s uncertainty? We’ll have to wait and see. But based on who’s nominated, who’s presenting and who can always be counted on to make a particular kind of splash, here are a few predictions and/or hopes for what we can expect to see from some of our favorites: J Lo: She’s one of a long list of presenters this year, and with any luck, she’ll don something unforgettable From her past glittering Badgely Mischka sheath dresses to her now-iconic, skin-baring Versace frock, she never disappoints. Charlize Theron: Also a presenter this year, the always-glam bombshell knows how to give a lesson in red carpet entrances. Remember her in metallic Dior haute couture two years ago? Or her stunning and head-turning red gown in 2016 — also Dior? In fact, she wears Dior often enough, that betting we’ll see her in the brand again this year isn’t exactly a long shot. Brie Larson: Another presenter, and someone we can never quite put a finger on, fashion-wise. Maybe she’ll show up in a classic silhouette, as she has in Oscar de la Renta. Or perhaps in something like the Calvin Klein halter gown she wore to the 2016 Golden Globes. Whatever she comes up with, odds are it’ll be stunning — a la her ruby red Rodarte sweetheart gown from the 2017 Golden Globes. Lady Gaga: A best original song nominee, she and Bradley Cooper will be performing together as their “A Star Is Born” characters. If they’re in character, that means no outrageous or rocked-out costume on stage (as we saw in Gaga’s solo performance of “Shallow” at the Grammys). But it would be surprising if she didn’t take things to the max for the red carpet. And as we know with her, the sky’s always the limit. Amy Adams: She’ll be there as a nominee for best actress in a supporting role for “Vice,” and I can’t wait to see what she cooks up for us. She’s always made the most of her beautiful pale skin and red hair at high-glam events, usually with very classic, Old Hollywood looks. I loved her sweeping, periwinkle blue Atelier Versace she wore to to the Golden Globes in 2015 as much as the two-tone red halter Versace number she chose for the 2014 Globes. Emma Stone: She too, will be there as a nominee for actress in a supporting role for “The Favourite.” And she’s another woman who goes in for classic Hollywood looks. Her choices are always feminine and on the haute end — the likes of Roland Mouret, Prada, Giambattista Valli and Rochas. Glenn Close: She’ll be up for best actress in a leading role category for her performance in “The Wife.” She’s historically a big fan of power suits on the red carpet — from Alexander McQueen in lavender silk to elegant pure white Ralph Lauren designs. This time, though, I think we have a chance of seeing her in a dress, given the number of voices saying this year will be her big moment in the Academy’s spotlight.  
20 Feb 19
Archy news nety

Tuesday evening Christina Hendricks had a great impression when she participated in the Costume Designers Guild Awards in Beverly Hills. The 43-year-old native of Tennessee wore his famous 5-foot figure in a blue suit with a galactic print overlay selected by the stylist Lawren Sample. The actress, best known for her TV series Mad Men, […]