Sacred Activism

21 Jul 19
Beyond Nuclear International

But a new one is approved at Yeelirrie in Australia

21 Jul 19
The Gonzo Tribune

Where do we go from here? I see a lot of people looking at the 2020 election and acting as if it’s fix the mess we are in right now. Well I have news for everyone, it doesn’t matter who is in the oval office, there is no going back. We cannot just pull a […]

21 Jul 19
Laura Loomer Official

At the center of the nation’s attention, with a punishing thunderstorm adding to the drama, the St. Louis Park City Council, which included Mayor Jake Spano (who was not present during the previous vote), invoked an outstanding 7-0 unanimous decision to reinstate the Pledge of Allegiance to their agenda. A full and complete 180-turn from […]

20 Jul 19
Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News

HONOLULU (AP) — Walter Ritte has been fighting for decades to protect Native Hawaiian rights, inspiring a new generation of activists trying to stop construction of a giant telescope they see as representative of a bigger struggle. In his early 30s, Ritte occupied a small Hawaiian island used as a military bombing range. Now at […]

20 Jul 19
The official Washington D.C. news site - timworld.info

National Business Native Hawaiians say telescope represents bigger struggle By JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER Associated Press July 20, 2019 12:35 PM ORDER REPRINT → FILE – In this Sunday, July 14, 2019, file photo, Native Hawaiian activists pray at the base of Hawaii’s Mauna Kea, background. For activists who say they’re protecting Mauna Kea, the fight […]

20 Jul 19
The Outpost

Only 65% of Americans believe that climate change is a “very serious” or “somewhat serious” issue, a decline from 77% in 2007. Nearly 15% of Americans fully deny climate change, which contravenes the near-universally accepted scientific conclusion that anthropogenic climate change exists. The government’s record of inaction is also concerning. From failing to ratify the […]

20 Jul 19
Howzit Kohala

HONOLULU (AP) — Walter Ritte has been fighting for decades to protect Native Hawaiian rights, inspiring a new generation of activists trying to stop construction of a giant telescope they see as representative of a bigger struggle. In his early 30s, Ritte occupied a small Hawaiian island used as a military bombing range. Now at […]

20 Jul 19
KAFILA - 12 YEARS OF A COMMON JOURNEY

Guest Post by AFIYA ZIA A year ago, Pakistan’s national elections brought in a new government led by the Pakistan Tehreeq e Insaf (PTI) and headed by the former-cricketer-turned politician, Imran Khan. Khan had been drifting in the political wilderness for 22 years, waiting for providence to appoint him Prime Minister. As the 2018 elections […]

19 Jul 19
Gemma ~ Luminous Life

My beautiful friend Juliana and I were discussing at length and may I say with a great deal of respectful mirth, the current agenda in consciousness and spiritual circles to denigrate ‘Bliss’. Bliss, that thing that mythopoetic genius Joseph Campbell requested us to Follow. From the Dark Night rising up out of the abyss on […]

19 Jul 19
Archy news nety

Late last month Conservative media personality Andy Ngo sent me a video of Popular Mobilization, a group of anti-fascists organizing protests in response to right-wing rallies in Portland, Oregon. In Kelis & # 39; "Milkshake," the video challenged the local left to demonstrate on June 29 against a march planned by the Proud Boys, the […]

19 Jul 19
Arcynewsy

Late last month, the conservative media personality Andy Ngo sent me a video made by Popular Mobilization, a group of anti-fascists who organize protests in response to right-wing rallies in Portland, Oregon. Set to Kelis’s “Milkshake,” the video implored localists to turn out on June 29 to demonstrate against the march by the Proud Boys, […]

18 Jul 19
Daily News
How do you get to Woodstock after only eight or so gigs? If you’re Sha Na Na you impress Jimi Hendrix with your retro rock and R&B act, and he tells the festival organizers to put you on the bill. It was almost as simple as that, says Sha Na Na drummer Jocko Marcellino, who with other members of the long-running act will do a Q-and-A and performance at the Grammy Museum on Monday, July 22. The group that formed on the campus of Columbia University where most of its members had been part of the glee club had in 1969 decided to adopt the persona of 1950s rockers, greasing their hair up into pompadours and renting gold lamé suits like Elvis Presley famously wore. And on campus they were an immediate hit, Marcellino says. “It was sort of a night off from the revolution on the Columbia campus,” he says of those volatile days of student unrest and Vietnam War protests. “They all started role-playing like we were.” “Then our bass singer at the time, Alan Cooper, marched down to Steve Paul’s Scene in Hell’s Kitchen and they booked us for two weeks,” Marcellino says. “It was where all the rock stars came after their gigs. “Jimi Hendrix started coming down to see us do our thing and was really grooving on it,” he says. “Janis Joplin was there, Frank Zappa was there, Led Zeppelin was there. “It was pretty mind-blowing for a young rocker at 19 to be walking with these gods.” On the last night Hendrix brought Woodstock organizers including Michael Lang to the Scene to check out Sha Na Na, and the neophyte band was offered a spot on the lineup. “We got $350 to play — the check bounced,” Marcellino says. “We got a dollar to play in the movie, which was so fortunate. This was in some ways the beginning of our career.” Marcellino says he drove a little van with all of their gear onto the festival grounds behind a truck carrying equipment for Sly and the Family Stone. Once there it was not at all what he’d expected. “What I expected wasn’t happening,” he says. “I expected to be hanging out with rock stars and back stage in a cool area. Throw all that out the window.” Woodstock, famously, was a mess, a should-have-been-a-disaster but for the communal spirit of performers and musicians alike. And that included the still-protective nature of Hendrix toward his discoveries. “We didn’t get on Saturday night — some major dudes got on,” Marcellino says. “And then Sunday they had to halt it because of that rain storm. The stage was sinking. They didn’t want anyone to fry. “They went to Hendrix (early Monday) and said, ‘We want you to go on and close the show,’” he says. “And he and his manager said, ‘No, there are a couple of acts that haven’t gone on. We want them to play.’ So he he saved our slots.” Woodstock was instantly and remains an iconic point on the timeline of pop culture for a handful of specific reasons, Marcellino says. “We were closing a decade of volatile American experience,” he says. “The Chicago Democratic Convention, women’s liberation movement, the assassinations of Dr. King and the Kennedys. The war in Vietnam. It was volatile times. “And it was a decade of activism, too. This concert sort of gathered all that in a way and became the name of the generation. It was the Woodstock Generation.” Over the years he and Sha Na Na have returned to the site of Woodstock a few times, including last month as part as a series of musical performances by a handful of acts that played there in 1969. “It was just great to be back,” Marcellino says. “There we were on the sacred grounds of Max’s farm. It was really cool.” Marcellino and other members of Sha Na Na will appear at the Grammy Museum at 7 p.m. Monday, July 22 for a conversation, Q-and-A, and performance. Tickets are $25. For more information go to Shanana.com — where you can also find out about the group’s new album of original songs and classic live tracks — or Grammymuseum.org. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
18 Jul 19
Pasadena Star News
How do you get to Woodstock after only eight or so gigs? If you’re Sha Na Na you impress Jimi Hendrix with your retro rock and R&B act, and he tells the festival organizers to put you on the bill. It was almost as simple as that, says Sha Na Na drummer Jocko Marcellino, who with other members of the long-running act will do a Q-and-A and performance at the Grammy Museum on Monday, July 22. The group that formed on the campus of Columbia University where most of its members had been part of the glee club had in 1969 decided to adopt the persona of 1950s rockers, greasing their hair up into pompadours and renting gold lamé suits like Elvis Presley famously wore. #gallery-2333094-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2333094-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2333094-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2333094-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Actress Zooey Deschanel will provide the singing voice of Belle during the live-to-film concert of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on Friday, May 25 and Saturday, May 26. (Photo by Jordan Strauss, Associated Press) Anthony Evans will provide the singing voice of the Beast during the live-to-film concert of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on Friday, May 25 and Saturday, May 26. (Photo by Wade Payne, Associated Press) Actor Taye Diggs will provide the singing voice of Gaston during the live-to-film concert of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on Friday, May 25 and Saturday, May 26. (Photo by Richard Shotwell, Associated Press) Actress Rebel Wilson will provide the singing voice of LeFu during the live-to-film concert of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on Friday, May 25 and Saturday, May 26. (Photo by Richard Shotwell, Associated Press) Actress Jane Krakowski will provide the singing voice of Mrs. Potts during the live-to-film concert of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on Friday, May 25 and Saturday, May 26. (Photo by Charles Sykes, Associated Press) And on campus they were an immediate hit, Marcellino says. “It was sort of a night off from the revolution on the Columbia campus,” he says of those volatile days of student unrest and Vietnam War protests. “They all started role-playing like we were.” “Then our bass singer at the time, Alan Cooper, marched down to Steve Paul’s Scene in Hell’s Kitchen and they booked us for two weeks,” Marcellino says. “It was where all the rock stars came after their gigs. “Jimi Hendrix started coming down to see us do our thing and was really grooving on it,” he says. “Janis Joplin was there, Frank Zappa was there, Led Zeppelin was there. “It was pretty mind-blowing for a young rocker at 19 to be walking with these gods.” On the last night Hendrix brought Woodstock organizers including Michael Lang to the Scene to check out Sha Na Na, and the neophyte band was offered a spot on the lineup. “We got $350 to play — the check bounced,” Marcellino says. “We got a dollar to play in the movie, which was so fortunate. This was in some ways the beginning of our career.” Marcellino says he drove a little van with all of their gear onto the festival grounds behind a truck carrying equipment for Sly and the Family Stone. Once there it was not at all what he’d expected. “What I expected wasn’t happening,” he says. “I expected to be hanging out with rock stars and back stage in a cool area. Throw all that out the window.” Woodstock, famously, was a mess, a should-have-been-a-disaster but for the communal spirit of performers and musicians alike. And that included the still-protective nature of Hendrix toward his discoveries. “We didn’t get on Saturday night — some major dudes got on,” Marcellino says. “And then Sunday they had to halt it because of that rain storm. The stage was sinking. They didn’t want anyone to fry. “They went to Hendrix (early Monday) and said, ‘We want you to go on and close the show,’” he says. “And he and his manager said, ‘No, there are a couple of acts that haven’t gone on. We want them to play.’ So he he saved our slots.” Woodstock was instantly and remains an iconic point on the timeline of pop culture for a handful of specific reasons, Marcellino says. “We were closing a decade of volatile American experience,” he says. “The Chicago Democratic Convention, women’s liberation movement, the assassinations of Dr. King and the Kennedys. The war in Vietnam. It was volatile times. “And it was a decade of activism, too. This concert sort of gathered all that in a way and became the name of the generation. It was the Woodstock Generation.” Over the years he and Sha Na Na have returned to the site of Woodstock a few times, including last month as part as a series of musical performances by a handful of acts that played there in 1969. “It was just great to be back,” Marcellino says. “There we were on the sacred grounds of Max’s farm. It was really cool.” Marcellino and other members of Sha Na Na will appear at the Grammy Museum at 7 p.m. Monday, July 22 for a conversation, Q-and-A, and performance. Tickets are $25. For more information go to Shanana.com — where you can also find out about the group’s new album of original songs and classic live tracks — or Grammymuseum.org. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
18 Jul 19
Press Telegram
How do you get to Woodstock after only eight or so gigs? If you’re Sha Na Na you impress Jimi Hendrix with your retro rock and R&B act, and he tells the festival organizers to put you on the bill. It was almost as simple as that, says Sha Na Na drummer Jocko Marcellino, who with other members of the long-running act will do a Q-and-A and performance at the Grammy Museum on Monday, July 22. The group that formed on the campus of Columbia University where most of its members had been part of the glee club had in 1969 decided to adopt the persona of 1950s rockers, greasing their hair up into pompadours and renting gold lamé suits like Elvis Presley famously wore. #gallery-2243587-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2243587-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2243587-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2243587-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Starting pitcher Gio Gonzalez #47 of the Milwaukee is comforted by teammate Mike Moustakas before being taken out of the game after injuring his ankle trying to field an infield single by Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the second inning of Game 4 of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits an infield single back to pitcher Gio Gonzalez #47 of the Milwaukee Brewers, who injured his ankle on the play, during the second inning of Game 4 of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Starting pitcher Rich Hill #44 of the Los Angeles Dodgers throws to the plate to start the game against Lorenzo Cain #6 of the Milwaukee Brewers in Game 4 of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) The Dodgers’ Chris Taylor celebrates as he scores past Brewers catcher Manny Pina on a single by Brian Dozier during the first inning of Game 4 of the NLCS on Tuesday at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Dodger fans cheer after Chris Taylor scores on a single by Brian Dozier against the Milwaukee Brewers in the first inning in Game 4 of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) And on campus they were an immediate hit, Marcellino says. “It was sort of a night off from the revolution on the Columbia campus,” he says of those volatile days of student unrest and Vietnam War protests. “They all started role-playing like we were.” “Then our bass singer at the time, Alan Cooper, marched down to Steve Paul’s Scene in Hell’s Kitchen and they booked us for two weeks,” Marcellino says. “It was where all the rock stars came after their gigs. “Jimi Hendrix started coming down to see us do our thing and was really grooving on it,” he says. “Janis Joplin was there, Frank Zappa was there, Led Zeppelin was there. “It was pretty mind-blowing for a young rocker at 19 to be walking with these gods.” On the last night Hendrix brought Woodstock organizers including Michael Lang to the Scene to check out Sha Na Na, and the neophyte band was offered a spot on the lineup. “We got $350 to play — the check bounced,” Marcellino says. “We got a dollar to play in the movie, which was so fortunate. This was in some ways the beginning of our career.” Marcellino says he drove a little van with all of their gear onto the festival grounds behind a truck carrying equipment for Sly and the Family Stone. Once there it was not at all what he’d expected. “What I expected wasn’t happening,” he says. “I expected to be hanging out with rock stars and back stage in a cool area. Throw all that out the window.” Woodstock, famously, was a mess, a should-have-been-a-disaster but for the communal spirit of performers and musicians alike. And that included the still-protective nature of Hendrix toward his discoveries. “We didn’t get on Saturday night — some major dudes got on,” Marcellino says. “And then Sunday they had to halt it because of that rain storm. The stage was sinking. They didn’t want anyone to fry. “They went to Hendrix (early Monday) and said, ‘We want you to go on and close the show,’” he says. “And he and his manager said, ‘No, there are a couple of acts that haven’t gone on. We want them to play.’ So he he saved our slots.” Woodstock was instantly and remains an iconic point on the timeline of pop culture for a handful of specific reasons, Marcellino says. “We were closing a decade of volatile American experience,” he says. “The Chicago Democratic Convention, women’s liberation movement, the assassinations of Dr. King and the Kennedys. The war in Vietnam. It was volatile times. “And it was a decade of activism, too. This concert sort of gathered all that in a way and became the name of the generation. It was the Woodstock Generation.” Over the years he and Sha Na Na have returned to the site of Woodstock a few times, including last month as part as a series of musical performances by a handful of acts that played there in 1969. “It was just great to be back,” Marcellino says. “There we were on the sacred grounds of Max’s farm. It was really cool.” Marcellino and other members of Sha Na Na will appear at the Grammy Museum at 7 p.m. Monday, July 22 for a conversation, Q-and-A, and performance. Tickets are $25. For more information go to Shanana.com — where you can also find out about the group’s new album of original songs and classic live tracks — or Grammymuseum.org. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]