Salton

24 May 19
The Things We Do For Fun

It’s a strange this how we get used to a certain way of life. After 11 months of travelling with Karen, and the last five of that having al but just each other to talk to due to our lack of Spanish, it was just the way it was. So saying goodbye to Karen as […]

23 May 19
GIFT REGISTER

Enjoy the perfect traditional cup of coffee without leaving the comfort of your own home. Perfect for coffee enthusiasts, the Salton Cordless Percolator brews 4 to 10 cups of robust, hot and flavorful coffee. The keep warm feature keeps your coffee at the perfect temperature and automatically shuts off after 2 hours and the reusable brew basket saves you the cost of paper filters. With its attractive design and stainless steel body, the Cordless Percolator is perfect for entertaining a cool touc

23 May 19
GIFT REGISTER

The Jumbo Java brews a whopping 14 cups of coffee! With a 24-hour programmable timer, you can start every morning with a fresh cup of java. The keep-warm feature keeps your coffee at the perfect temperature and automatically shuts off after 2 hours. With pause and serve you can pour a quick cup of joe […]

23 May 19
Evan Quarnstrom

The story of a challenging mountain climb deep in the desert of California

23 May 19
davidscottmoyer

Image captured in 2015 at Bombay Beach, on the shore of the Salton Sea in California’s Imperial Valley. In 1905, engineers of the California Development Company cut a channel into the bank of the Colorado River, hoping to augment the flow of water to the irrigation canals supplying farms in the Imperial Valley. They miscalculated, […]

23 May 19
Boulder City Review
#gallery-52476-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-52476-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-52476-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-52476-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) Commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Brenda Burman signs the interstate drought contingency plan next to Assistant Secretary for Water and Science for the Department of the Interior Tim Petty at the Hoover Dam in Boulder City on Monday, May 20. Looking on are, from left, New Mexico State Engineer John D’Antonio, Wyoming Commissioner of the Upper Colorado River Commission Pat Tyrrell, Director of Utah Division of Water Resources Eric Millis, Director for the Arizona Department of Water Resources Tom Buschatzke, Chairman of the Colorado River Board of California Peter Nelson, and General Manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority John Entsminger. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) Terry Fulp, lower Colorado regional director for the Bureau of Reclamation, far left, addresses representatives from the Colorado River Basin states as they prepare to sign an interstate drought contingency plan meant to protect minimum water levels in Lakes Mead and Powell at the Hoover Dam on Monday, May 20. Looking on are, from left, Colorado Commissioner James Eklund from the Upper Colorado River Commission, New Mexico State Engineer John D’Antonio, Director of Utah Division of Water Resources Eric Millis, Wyoming Commissioner of the Upper Colorado River Commission Pat Tyrrell, Commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Brenda Burman, Assistant Secretary for Water and Science for the Department of the Interior Tim Petty, Director for the Arizona Department of Water Resources Tom Buschatzke, Chairman of the Colorado River Board of California Peter Nelson, and General Manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority John Entsminger. Top water officials from across the Southwest gathered at the Hoover Dam on Monday to celebrate the completion of emergency drought plans for the Colorado River. From an observation deck overlooking the dam, federal regulators and representatives of the seven states that share the river signed the last of the legal documents needed to enact the drought contingency plans. “The Colorado is the single most important water resource in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico,” Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman said. “These (plans) reduce the risks that face everyone who relies on the Colorado River.” The cooperative plans call for Nevada, Arizona and, eventually, California to voluntarily cut their river usage and leave more water in Lake Mead. Meanwhile, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming have pledged to send more water downstream to prop up Lake Powell and protect hydropower generation at Glen Canyon Dam. The signing ceremony took place within sight of one of the drought’s most startling monuments: the bleached-white bathtub ring on the cliffs around Lake Mead marking a 130-foot drop in the water level since 2000. Barring a sharp and unexpected rise in the lake in the coming months, the first round of annual cuts is expected to hit in January, when Arizona will give up 192,000 acre-feet of water and Nevada will give up 8,000 acre-feet. One acre-foot is enough water to supply two average Las Vegas Valley homes for just over a year. Southern Nevada Water Authority General Manager John Entsminger said the community already has conserved more than enough water to easily absorb the cuts. The completion of the drought plans also activates a series of voluntary reductions by Mexico, which agreed to leave more of its river water in Lake Mead several years ago pending the deal among the seven states. Mexico’s first contribution to Lake Mead of 41,000 acre-feet could come next year. California would join in the voluntary cuts only if the lake’s water level drops 42 feet from where it is now. Negotiations on the hard-fought deal took years, 2,152 days to be exact from the first meeting to the last, according to Terry Fulp, lower Colorado regional director for the bureau. In the end, it was signed without the river’s largest water user. California’s Imperial Irrigation District, which draws more from the Colorado than any other entity, refused to sign the pact because it doesn’t address the growing environmental threat posed by the shrinking Salton Sea. The massive agricultural water supplier filed a lawsuit in California last month, contending that the drought plan could violate state environmental laws. Jeffrey Kightlinger, general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, said his agency is still in talks with Imperial over a compromise he hopes will lead to the irrigation district joining the multistate river deal. “But we are in litigation as well,” Kightlinger said. Entsminger said that “it’s always better if everyone is involved,” but Imperial’s decision not to participate won’t affect the larger deal. California has committed to leaving the same amount of water in Lake Mead regardless, he said. “I think the most important takeaway for Nevada residents is that seven states and two countries are working cooperatively to ensure the reliability of the Colorado River,” Entsminger said from the Hoover Dam observation deck. “There really is no more important natural resource to Nevada than this river.” Contact Henry Brean at hbrean@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0350. Follow @RefriedBrean on Twitter.
23 May 19
NBC Palm Springs - News, Weather, Traffic, Breaking News

[bc_video video_id=”6040050028001″ account_id=”5728959025001″ player_id=”Hkbio1usDM” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%”] Coachella Valley Unified School District apologized after a driver left a special needs child in a vehicle for four hours on Monday. The child did not suffer any injuries and returned to school on Wednesday. Back in 2014, a different child with autism was […]

22 May 19
RetroZap

Did Indiana Jones ever use a telephone? What would a Workaholics-style show look like starring the Max Rebo Band? These deep thoughts, plus reviews of Dooku: Jedi Lost, Whistlepig Rye, and Fear Factory albums.

21 May 19
The List

Watching someone you love and look up to become bed bound is a trying experience for most. It is especially trying for a child to witness the health and well-being of a parent, gradually decline. Growing up my parents tried, within their best efforts, to shield me from the harsh reality of illness. What they […]

21 May 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1668958-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1668958-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1668958-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1668958-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Terry Fulp, Lower Colorado Regional Director for the Bureau of Reclamation, far left, addresses representatives from the Colorado River Basin states as they prepare to sign an interstate drought contingency plan meant to protect minimum water levels in Lake Mead and Lake Powell at the Hoover Dam in Boulder City, Monday, May 20, 2019. From left, Colorado Commissioner James Eklund from the Upper Colorado River Commission, New Mexico State Engineer John D’Antonio, Director of Utah Division of Water Resources Eric Millis, Wyoming Commissioner of the Upper Colorado River Commission Pat Tyrrell, Commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Brenda Burman, Asst. Secretary for Water & Science for the Department of the Interior Tim Petty, Director for the Arizona Department of Water Resources Tom Buschatzke, Chairman of the Colorado River Board of California Peter Nelson, and General Manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority John Entsminger. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Brenda Burman signs the interstate drought contingency plan next to Asst. Secretary for Water & Science for the Department of the Interior Tim Petty at the Hoover Dam in Boulder City, Monday, May 20, 2019. Looking on are New Mexico State Engineer John D’Antonio, from left, Wyoming Commissioner of the Upper Colorado River Commission Pat Tyrrell, Director of Utah Division of Water Resources Eric Millis, Director for the Arizona Department of Water Resources Tom Buschatzke, Chairman of the Colorado River Board of California Peter Nelson, and General Manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority John Entsminger (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Top water officials from across the Southwest gathered at the Hoover Dam on Monday to celebrate the completion of emergency drought plans for the Colorado River. From an observation deck overlooking the dam, federal regulators and representatives of the seven states that share the river signed the last of the legal documents needed to enact the so-called Drought Contingency Plans. “The Colorado is the single most important water resource in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico,” said Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman. “These (plans) reduce the risks that face everyone who relies on the Colorado River.” The cooperative plans call for Nevada, Arizona and, eventually, California to voluntarily cut their river usage and leave more water in Lake Mead. Meanwhile, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming have pledged to send more water downstream to prop up Lake Powell and protect hydropower generation at Glen Canyon Dam. The signing ceremony took place within sight of one of the drought’s most startling monuments: the bleached-white bathtub ring on the cliffs around Lake Mead marking a 130-foot drop in the water level since 2000. Barring a sharp and unexpected rise in the lake in the coming months, the first round of annual cuts is expected to hit in January, when Arizona will give up 192,000 acre-feet of water and Nevada will give up 8,000 acre-feet. One acre-foot is enough water to supply two average Las Vegas Valley homes for just over a year. Southern Nevada Water Authority General Manager John Entsminger said the community has already conserved more than enough water to easily absorb the cuts. The completion of the drought plans also activates a series of voluntary reductions by Mexico, which agreed to leave more of its river water in Lake Mead several years ago pending the deal among the seven states. Mexico’s first contribution to Lake Mead of 41,000 acre-feet could come next year. California would join in the voluntary cuts only if the lake’s water level drops 42 feet from where it is now. Negotiations on the hard-fought deal took years, 2,152 days to be exact from the first meeting to the last, according to Terry Fulp, lower Colorado regional director for the bureau. In the end, it was signed without the river’s largest water user. California’s Imperial Irrigation District, which draws more from the Colorado than any other entity, refused to sign the pact because it doesn’t address the growing environmental threat posed by the shrinking Salton Sea. The massive agricultural water supplier filed suit in California last month, claiming that the drought plan could violate state environmental laws. Jeffrey Kightlinger, general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, said his agency is still in talks with Imperial over a compromise he hopes will lead to the irrigation district joining the multistate river deal. “But we are in litigation as well,” Kightlinger said. Entsminger said “it’s always better if everyone is involved,” but Imperial’s decision not to participate won’t affect the larger deal. California has committed to leaving the same amount of water in Lake Mead regardless, he said. “I think the most important takeaway for Nevada residents is that seven states and two countries are working cooperatively to ensure the reliability of the Colorado River,” Entsminger said from the Hoover Dam observation deck. “There really is no more important natural resource to Nevada than this river.” Contact Henry Brean at hbrean@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0350. Follow @RefriedBrean on Twitter. [rjtemplate class=”rj-isidebar3-elem”] Drought response Nevada, Arizona and California have agreed to an escalating series of water cuts as part of the Drought Contingency Plan for the Lower Colorado River Basin. Mexico also will reduce its river use as part of an earlier treaty agreement. The annual cuts, expected to start early next year, are based on the water level in Lake Mead, which currently sits at about 1,087 feet above sea levelcurrent as of May 20: Jan. 1 lake level between 1,090 and 1,075 feet: Nevada: 8,000 acre-feet Arizona: 192,000 Mexico: 41,000 Between 1,075 and 1,050 feet: Nevada: 8,000 Arizona: 192,000 Mexico: 30,000 Between 1,050 and 1,045 feet: Nevada: 8,000 Arizona: 192,000 Mexico: 34,000 Between 1,045 and 1,040 feet: Nevada: 10,000 Arizona: 240,000 California: 200,000 Mexico: 76,000 Between 1,040 and 1,035 feet: Nevada: 10,000 Arizona: 240,000 California: 250,000 Mexico: 84,000 Between 1,035 and 1,030 feet: Nevada: 10,000 Arizona: 240,000 California: 300,000 Mexico: 92,000 Between 1,030 and 1,025 feet: Nevada: 10,000 Arizona: 240,000 California: 350,000 Mexico: 101,000 Below 1,025 feet: Nevada: 10,000 Arizona: 240,000 California: 350,000 Mexico: 150,000 *One acre-foot of water will supply two average Las Vegas Valley homes for just over one year. [/rjtemplate]
21 May 19
Newsy Today

CLOSE Brenda Burman, Bureau of the Reclamation Commissioner, talks about the Colorado River Drought Contingency Plan, 20 May, 2019, at Hoover Dam. Arizona Republic Tom Buschatzke (2nd from right, Director, Arizona Water Resources Department) signs the Colorado River River Contingency Plan, May 20, 2019, at the Hoover border, Arizona / Nevada. Looking at it are […]

21 May 19
Archy news nety

CLOSE TO Brenda Burman, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner, talks about the Colorado River Dryought Contingency Plan, May 20, 2019, at Hoover Dam. Arizona Republic Tom Buschatzke (2nd from the right, director, Arizona Department of Water Resources) signs the Colorado River Drought Contingency Plan, May 20, 2019, at the border of Hoover Dam, Arizona / Nevada. […]

20 May 19
Interdisciplinary Writing Program & the University Writing Commons

Edgar is pursuing a Masters in History at NAU. Imperial Dreams is about where he is from, always being between borders. But now, there’s a new border: being on edge of ecological disaster.

20 May 19
Archy news nety

CLOSE TO Water managers in Arizona write their Colorado River drought plan as a historic step forward. Critics see disadvantages and missed opportunities. Diana Payan, the Republic azcentral.com After months of tense, difficult negotiations, a plan to spread the effects of the expected cutbacks on the drought-stricken Colorado River are nearing completion. On Monday, representatives […]