Salton

14 Dec 18
CAYROUSLOVO BLOG

The 82 Percent Problem. In its 2015 Answers Issue, Time Magazine cited a study that states 82 percent of recent college alumni said they cheated in some way during It’s been a long time since I penned my college application essays, but that doesn’t mean I don’t still appreciate them. On the contrary: I think […]

14 Dec 18
Wild and Free

2018 has been a year of rebuilding faith.  And when I say “faith” I don’t mean religion. What I mean is trusting my deepest experiences in this life.  For me faith is that thing that gets me out of bed each day, knowing there are new experiences awaiting me. It’s an action verb not a […]

14 Dec 18
Cultivated Kale

Yesterday was my 32nd birthday, and it was fantastic! I slept in, skated, enjoyed some delicious vegan lemon bars that Aaron made me (I am obsessed with all things citrus), and then we went into the mountains last night to go watch the meteor shower.    Thank you to everyone who sent me well wishes […]

14 Dec 18
Snoopy & the Funks Great Adventure

Before we left the palm springs area last week we took a drive down to the salton sea to find out if the stories of this now desolate place were true. The salton sea is one of a few inland salt water bodies and was formed over two years starting in 1905 when a levy […]

14 Dec 18
Shawn Miller

Las Vegas • The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users […]

14 Dec 18
The Colorado Sun
By Ken Ritter, The Associated Press LAS VEGAS —  The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users from Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming should have had a pact to sign at an annual water users’ conference this week in Las Vegas, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman said. They didn’t. However, a flurry of approvals in several states in recent weeks signaled urgency and set a stage for an overall agreement to use less water from a river beset by drought and locked into promises to deliver more water than it takes in. Burman identified California and Arizona as the holdouts. MORE: Plan to slow creeping Colorado River crisis could drain more water from Blue Mesa, Flaming Gorge reservoirs “Close isn’t ‘done,’ ” she told a standing-room crowd at the Colorado River Water Users Association conference at a Las Vegas Strip resort. “Only ‘done’ will protect this basin.” The river that carries winter snowmelt from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico is plumbed with dams to generate hydropower and meter water releases. It provides drinking water to 40 million people and cities including Los Angeles, San Diego, Denver, Phoenix and Las Vegas. It irrigates crops in wide areas once deemed as reclaimed desert in the U.S. and Mexico. The keys to contingency plans are voluntary agreements to use less water than users are allocated from the river’s two largest reservoirs, Lake Powell behind the Glen Canyon Dam on the Arizona-Utah state line and Lake Mead behind Hoover Dam just east of Las Vegas. Lake Powell is currently at 43 percent capacity; Lake Mead at 38 percent. Lake Powell earlier this year. (Jed Selby, Special to The Colorado Sun) To date, entities including agricultural districts and municipal suppliers in five states have reached what Burman characterized as a complex puzzle of agreements. Indian tribes also are involved, and Burman on Thursday announced publication of a report called the Colorado River Basin Ten Tribes Partnership Tribal Water Study . It charts water claims and use by tribes that hold rights to divert almost 20 percent of the water in the river. A drought-shortage declaration next year would cut 11.4 percent of Arizona’s usual river water allocation beginning in 2020, and 4.3 percent of Nevada’s share. That amount of water, combined, would serve more than 625,000 homes. California would voluntarily reduce its Colorado River use by about 6 percent. Arizona gained approvals for conservation, mitigation and payment plans from its Department of Water Resources and the key Central Arizona Project irrigation district. Unlike the other states, it also needs state Legislature approval for water agreements. Lawmakers convene in January. MORE: Amid drought, a changing climate and population growth, can Colorado’s unique water law system survive? In California, the largest municipal suppliers have signed on, including the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California serving some 19 million people. However, the sprawling Imperial Irrigation District, which holds some of the largest and oldest rights to river water, has so far granted only tentative approval. James Hanks, board president, said in an interview the district wants to be last to sign so it can see what others agree to. It also wants government help to save the Salton Sea, a briny shallow desert lake east of Palm Springs, California, that is fed primarily by agricultural irrigation runoff. Dusty hot winds blowing across exposed former shorelines are blamed for asthma by area residents who also complain of sometimes brackish smells. Burman didn’t say what the federal government plans if it is left to impose restrictions. But local officials warned that a free-for-all could lead to crippling lawsuits and legislative gridlock. John Entsminger, chief executive of the Southern Nevada Water Authority in Las Vegas, predicted “complete chaos” if negotiations that he compared with nuanced scalpel work are overridden by federal sledgehammer rules. “Everyone thinks their own water use is justified and no one else’s is,” observed Kathryn Sorensen, Phoenix city water services director. Keith Moses, vice chairman of the Colorado River Indian Tribal Council in Arizona, offered what he saw as a key to complex water questions. “To me, the best way of conserving water is not to use it,” he said before adding that he knew that would mean limiting growth so as not to continue to drain the Colorado River. “Realistically,” he added, “looking at it, that’s not going to happen.” More from The Colorado Sun Denver passed over, Salt Lake City gets the go-ahead to bid for Winter Olympics Hickenlooper commutes life sentences of 6 men convicted of murder, including in high-profile Curtis Brooks case Colorado, southwestern U.S. states now have a Jan. 31 deadline for drought deal The push by transgender people to change their birth certificates, a revamped Avery Brewing, development in Granby, Bennet-care and much more The legislature denied them four times, so transgender people found another way to rewrite Colorado law on birth certificates A revamped Avery Brewing looks to keep its beer cred after 25 years What’d I Miss: “So you weren’t in pain when you were filming this?” Jim Morrissey on ugly holiday sweaters and Denver’s dry spell Can a Colorado mountain blizzard bring a man to re-examine his life? As author David Hicks wrote “White Plains,” the narrative got uncomfortably personal
14 Dec 18
Coyote Gulch

From Aspen Journalism (Brent Gardner-Smith): The Upper Colorado River Commission voted unanimously Wednesday to execute three agreements designed to bolster Lake Powell’s and Lake Mead’s water levels, which have been falling due to persistent drought and encroaching aridification in the Colorado River system. The members of the commission, established in 1948 to help administer the […]

14 Dec 18
Site Title

DeepCloud AI is an AI-driven Cloud Computing project built on blockchain. DeepCloud AI’s Product Function DeepCloudAI is building an AI-driven decentralized cloud computing platform to run decentralized applications, specifically for IoT and Web 3.0 dApps. Our platform will provide a fully functional marketplace for computing and storage resources for companies, organizations, institutions and individuals – […]

14 Dec 18
STL.News

LAS VEGAS— The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users from […]

13 Dec 18
National Post

LAS VEGAS — The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users […]

13 Dec 18
The Denver Post
LAS VEGAS — The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users from Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming should have had a pact to sign at an annual water users’ conference this week in Las Vegas, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman said. They didn’t. However, a flurry of approvals in several states in recent weeks signaled urgency and set a stage for an overall agreement to use less water from a river beset by drought and locked into promises to deliver more water than it takes in. Burman identified California and Arizona as the holdouts. “Close isn’t ‘done,’ ” she told a standing-room crowd at the Colorado River Water Users Association conference at a Las Vegas Strip resort. “Only ‘done’ will protect this basin.” The river that carries winter snowmelt from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico is plumbed with dams to generate hydropower and meter water releases. It provides drinking water to 40 million people and cities including Los Angeles, San Diego, Denver, Phoenix and Las Vegas. It irrigates crops in wide areas once deemed as reclaimed desert in the U.S. and Mexico. The keys to contingency plans are voluntary agreements to use less water than users are allocated from the river’s two largest reservoirs, Lake Powell behind the Glen Canyon Dam on the Arizona-Utah state line and Lake Mead behind Hoover Dam just east of Las Vegas. Lake Powell is currently at 43 percent capacity; Lake Mead at 38 percent. To date, entities including agricultural districts and municipal suppliers in five states have reached what Burman characterized as a complex puzzle of agreements. Indian tribes also are involved, and Burman on Thursday announced publication of a report called the Colorado River Basin Ten Tribes Partnership Tribal Water Study . It charts water claims and use by tribes that hold rights to divert almost 20 percent of the water in the river. A drought-shortage declaration next year would cut 11.4 percent of Arizona’s usual river water allocation beginning in 2020, and 4.3 percent of Nevada’s share. That amount of water, combined, would serve more than 625,000 homes. California would voluntarily reduce its Colorado River use by about 6 percent. Arizona gained approvals for conservation, mitigation and payment plans from its Department of Water Resources and the key Central Arizona Project irrigation district. Unlike the other states, it also needs state Legislature approval for water agreements. Lawmakers convene in January. In California, the largest municipal suppliers have signed on, including the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California serving some 19 million people. However, the sprawling Imperial Irrigation District, which holds some of the largest and oldest rights to river water, has so far granted only tentative approval. James Hanks, board president, said in an interview the district wants to be last to sign so it can see what others agree to. It also wants government help to save the Salton Sea, a briny shallow desert lake east of Palm Springs, California, that is fed primarily by agricultural irrigation runoff. Dusty hot winds blowing across exposed former shorelines are blamed for asthma by area residents who also complain of sometimes brackish smells. Burman didn’t say what the federal government plans if it is left to impose restrictions. But local officials warned that a free-for-all could lead to crippling lawsuits and legislative gridlock. John Entsminger, chief executive of the Southern Nevada Water Authority in Las Vegas, predicted “complete chaos” if negotiations that he compared with nuanced scalpel work are overridden by federal sledgehammer rules. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “Everyone thinks their own water use is justified and no one else’s is,” observed Kathryn Sorensen, Phoenix city water services director. Keith Moses, vice chairman of the Colorado River Indian Tribal Council in Arizona, offered what he saw as a key to complex water questions. “To me, the best way of conserving water is not to use it,” he said before adding that he knew that would mean limiting growth so as not to continue to drain the Colorado River. “Realistically,” he added, “looking at it, that’s not going to happen.”
13 Dec 18
KTLA

The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users from Arizona, California, […]

13 Dec 18
Best Bottle

4 days/3 Nights (airfare not included)

Guided bike tour on the Caminhos de Pedra.

Dal Pizzol Fine Wines, Cristofoli Vinhos de Familia, Miolo Winery, Larentis Wines, Vinicola Salton, Vinícola Cainelli, Casa Valduga, Lidio Carraro Vinícola Boutique, Casa Vanni, Pousada Don Giovanni, and Vinícola Cave Geisse!

Hotel Laghetto Viverone Moinhos

Private Car and Driver.

12 Dec 18
Into The Night

Preface: This story, “The Last Time We Visited Aldera Dune”, appears in my next book, “Covenants of Lingering Bones.” It is a science-fiction story, something of a horror story, though one that isn’t entirely without hope. The word count is 4,277, that’s kind of a publication sweet-spot, just under five thousand words, that I struggled […]

11 Dec 18
Fino Grande

DEEPCLOUD AI – Next-Generation Cloud Computing What is DeepCloud AI? DeepCloudAI is building an AI-driven decentralized cloud computing platform to run decentralized applications, specifically for IoT and Web 3.0 dApps. Our platform will provide a fully functional marketplace for computing and storage resources for companies, organizations, institutions and individuals – enabling the sharing of excess […]

11 Dec 18

Wading Birds like this oystercatcher are fascinating to watch. I photographed this American Oystercatcher in South America. This Black Oystercatcher, near The Holler, was a rare sighting. California has about 668 species of birds. The Holler, and nearby environs alone, account for approximately 500 of them, including a variety of waders. Little Blue Herons can […]

11 Dec 18
Electronic Express

Now that we got the major appliances taken care of, it is really the little things that matter, such as coffee makers, toaster ovens, mixers, and blenders and let us not forget about the cook wear sets! Let Electronic Express help create memories in your home! We have it all, either ready to order online […]