Samantha Brown

12 Dec 18
Deadline

Hugh Grant, Jodie Whittaker and Letitia Wright are among 386 new BAFTA members. The 2018 intake span the film, games and TV industries across eleven countries. Scroll down for the full list of new members. Among new members are BAFTA-winner Grant, Doctor Who star Whittaker, BAFTA-nominee Willem Dafoe, Black Panther star Letitia Wright, La La Land producers Jordan Horowitz and Fred Berger, Mad Max: […]

12 Dec 18
Samantha's Dolls

A Sister’s Love
Ashton Drake Galleries
Artist: Waltraud Hanl

12 Dec 18
WWD

With the market at a high and big companies looking to get bigger, dealmakers came out of hibernation in 2018.

12 Dec 18
OMG News Today

LOS ANGELES (Reuters)  Divorcing Hollywood power couple Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt have reached a final agreement over the custody of their six children, Jolie’s lawyer said on Friday, after more than two years of often bitter negotiations “A custody arrangement was agreed to weeks ago, and has been signed by both parties and the […]

12 Dec 18
Red River Parish Journal

On December 7, 2018, DARE graduation was held at Red River Elementary School with 111 students graduating. DARE is a drug awareness program that is taught all across the United States. Students learn the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco as well as resistance strategies (how to say no). Students also learn a decision […]

11 Dec 18
James G. H. Seviour

By James G. Seviour “Do you promise to cherish each other. Abide by the love you now declare to one another. Through the blessings of the rings?” a robed priest stands above an old age couple in a glaringly-lit cathedral full of saints and images of religious figures. The old woman, Samantha, is crossed on […]

11 Dec 18
ADakalaBooks

It was a match made in heaven that turn into hell. It all started on a trip to the grocery store to buy eggs and cheese for breakfast. If it wasn’t for me Rushing that morning I would have gotten a basket instead of trying to hold all the groceries in my arm and that’s […]

11 Dec 18
Home from Heart

I love creating beautiful tables for the holidays! I think it is because it is an opportunity to be super creative and try to think of out of the box ideas to wow your guests. Today I am going to go through some ideas and steps to create your own tablescape for the holidays! The links […]

11 Dec 18
KarmaSingh

Humboldt International Film Festival Summary The Humboldt International Film Festival (HIFF) is a short film festival held each spring in Arcata, California.[1] The HIFF was founded in 1967, and brings independent and alternative short films to Humboldt County. It is the world’s oldest student-run film festival, and offers a venue for traditional films and alternative digital […]

11 Dec 18
authorsinterviews

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.   Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age? My name is Samantha Swain.  My age, well, I stopped telling that when I was 25.  I will admit that I’m in my 40’s. Fiona: […]

11 Dec 18
The American Girl Spot

Hello, readers! After releasing my newest project, the Chesapeake Doll Spa, last week, I’m super excited to show you the process of fixing up my first client, Samantha! Special thanks to Liz for trusting me with your doll, haha. When Samantha came to me, she was in pretty rough shape. Her hair was crazy, her […]

11 Dec 18
ArtFoodHome.com

I posted a recipe that Samantha’s mom (*read story below) shared with the group for Artichoke Chicken (originally from AllRecipes.com), and WOW – is it ever an amazing and very easy recipe. This is the perfect side dish to go along with it. This recipe comes together quickly, thanks to Trader Joe’s Organic Brown Rice […]

11 Dec 18
The Irish Sun
THE glamorous Fifty Shades of Grey books shed a whole new light on BDSM, presenting it as the alluring hobby of a sexy millionaire. Suddenly the dark world of whips, canes and red rooms of pain became a topic of national conversation, leading to sadomasochistic sexual encounters being featured in music videos and film in a way we’ve never seen before. It turns out consensual S&M is actually a criminal offence if you inflict injury on your partner So it may come as a surprise to hear that consensual S&M is actually illegal. If a person inflicts bodily harm – for example, consensual spanking which leaves a bruise – they have committed a criminal offence and could be sent to prison. Writing for The Conversation, Samantha Pegg, a senior lecturer in criminal law at Nottingham Trent University, discusses why bringing about changes to the law is a delicate balancing act… THE UK House of Lords ruled 25 years ago in the case of Brown that there was no public interest in allowing individuals to consent to injuries during sadomasochistic (S&M) encounters. Any sexual act which inflicts injury, even consensual spanking which leaves a bruise, is considered illegal In Brown, the appellants had engaged in various acts ranging from whipping and branding to beatings. The Law Lords expressed concerns about the dangers posed by these activities, particularly that they could get out of control and that the resultant harm may be greater than that which was anticipated. In their appeal the participants, a group of largely professional men who had taken great care to ensure their activities were safe, had argued that they had a right to engage in these private sexual activities. Fifty Shades of Grey thrust BDSM (bondage, domination, sadism and masochism) into popular culture They maintained that no harm had been caused that had not been consented to and that their use of code words and the sterilisation of their equipment meant that there was little risk of serious injury or the transmission of disease. These arguments were unsuccessful and where bodily harm is inflicted during consensual S&M – for example, consensual spanking which leaves a bruise – the person who has caused the injury has committed a criminal offence. Since this ruling, academics, campaigners and even bodies charged with reviewing the law have argued that this principle intrudes too far into the private lives of individuals. The books and subsequent films started a national conversation about sexual acts that had previously only been whispered about The law has certainly failed to keep apace with social change. In 2011, Fifty Shades of Grey thrust BDSM (bondage, domination, sadism and masochism) into popular culture and started a national conversation about sexual acts that had previously only been whispered about. Since then, BDSM has featured in music videos, popular fiction and cinema. It may then come as a surprise that it remains a criminal offence to inflict even minor harm during consensual S&M activities. Time for change Suggestions for changes to the law have included increasing the level of harm that can be consented to – allowing consent to nullify liability where injury is less than serious. It has also been suggested that as S&M may be part of a normal healthy sex life, the law should never intervene when consensual injuries are caused. There are obvious benefits to liberalising the law in this area. Personal autonomy and the right to a private life are key considerations for the law in any progressive democracy. Suggestions for changes to the law have included increasing the level of harm that can be consented to There have, however, been a number of cases that have recently reached the UK courts that illustrate the danger of taking too liberal an approach here. In August 2018, Jason Gaskell admitted gross negligence manslaughter after stabbing Laura Huteson in the neck during sadomasochistic sex. In December, Dean Wilkins pleaded guilty to actual body harm after engaging in – what he argued – was consensual S&M. And the trial of John Broadhurst for the murder of his partner – who allegedly died during sadomasochistic sex – continues. Jason Gaskell admitted gross negligence manslaughter after stabbing Laura Huteson in the neck during sadomasochistic sex If we allow consent to negate liability for injuries inflicted during S&M, it could pose additional difficulties for the criminal justice system in convicting abusers. Unpicking whether consent has been freely given can be a difficult task in  these circumstances. Those who engage in S&M are usually careful to respect personal boundaries, but there is, as the Law Lords have suggested, the potential for matters to get out of hand. S&M also necessarily relies on dominance and submission and any consent that is obtained, for example, under duress is not “real” consent. Eroticising violence The popularity of the Fifty Shades of Grey books and films has also prompted commentators to ask whether it is appropriate to talk about “good” or “consensual” BDSM without taking into account the endemic levels of violence against women and the eroticising of that violence in a pornified culture. Perhaps our greatest concern here should be that consent could be used to mask domestic violence and could provide an additional obstacle to claims of domestic abuse. Is it sensible to eroticise violence against women? It is certainly not difficult to imagine abusers arguing that the injuries they have inflicted upon their partner were part of a consensual S&M encounter. This is the problem with too readily allowing consent to negate liability in S&M encounters. In an environment where we recognise the dangers of coercive control and one in three women experience domestic abuse we do need to think very carefully about loosening the reins here. There are many good reasons for revisiting the principle in Brown and updating the law. Those who engage in S&M as part of a healthy sex life should be able to inflict consensual harm without being unfairly criminalised. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”24″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] But we also need to ensure that victims of abuse are protected. This is a delicate balancing act and it’s no surprise that successive governments have been unwilling to address the question of consent in this area. Last month we told how you can buy a BDSM advent calendar this Christmas. [bc_video video_id=”5739147261001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Dominatrix Jenny Nordbak reveals what it is like to work in a BDSM dungeon in Hollywood”] [iframe src=”%3Ciframe%20src%3D%22https%3A%2F%2Fcounter.theconversation.com%2Fcontent%2F108376%2Fcount.gif%3Fdistributor%3Drepublish-lightbox-advanced%22%20width%3D%221%22%20height%3D%221%22%3E%3C%2Fiframe%3E” /]
11 Dec 18
The Scottish Sun
THE glamorous Fifty Shades of Grey books shed a whole new light on BDSM, presenting it as the alluring hobby of a sexy millionaire. Suddenly the dark world of whips, canes and red rooms of pain became a topic of national conversation, leading to sadomasochistic sexual encounters being featured in music videos and film in a way we’ve never seen before. It turns out consensual S&M is actually a criminal offence if you inflict injury on your partner So it may come as a surprise to hear that consensual S&M is actually illegal. If a person inflicts bodily harm – for example, consensual spanking which leaves a bruise – they have committed a criminal offence and could be sent to prison. Writing for The Conversation, Samantha Pegg, a senior lecturer in criminal law at Nottingham Trent University, discusses why bringing about changes to the law is a delicate balancing act… THE UK House of Lords ruled 25 years ago in the case of Brown that there was no public interest in allowing individuals to consent to injuries during sadomasochistic (S&M) encounters. Any sexual act which inflicts injury, even consensual spanking which leaves a bruise, is considered illegal In Brown, the appellants had engaged in various acts ranging from whipping and branding to beatings. The Law Lords expressed concerns about the dangers posed by these activities, particularly that they could get out of control and that the resultant harm may be greater than that which was anticipated. In their appeal the participants, a group of largely professional men who had taken great care to ensure their activities were safe, had argued that they had a right to engage in these private sexual activities. Fifty Shades of Grey thrust BDSM (bondage, domination, sadism and masochism) into popular culture They maintained that no harm had been caused that had not been consented to and that their use of code words and the sterilisation of their equipment meant that there was little risk of serious injury or the transmission of disease. These arguments were unsuccessful and where bodily harm is inflicted during consensual S&M – for example, consensual spanking which leaves a bruise – the person who has caused the injury has committed a criminal offence. Since this ruling, academics, campaigners and even bodies charged with reviewing the law have argued that this principle intrudes too far into the private lives of individuals. The books and subsequent films started a national conversation about sexual acts that had previously only been whispered about The law has certainly failed to keep apace with social change. In 2011, Fifty Shades of Grey thrust BDSM (bondage, domination, sadism and masochism) into popular culture and started a national conversation about sexual acts that had previously only been whispered about. Since then, BDSM has featured in music videos, popular fiction and cinema. It may then come as a surprise that it remains a criminal offence to inflict even minor harm during consensual S&M activities. Time for change Suggestions for changes to the law have included increasing the level of harm that can be consented to – allowing consent to nullify liability where injury is less than serious. It has also been suggested that as S&M may be part of a normal healthy sex life, the law should never intervene when consensual injuries are caused. There are obvious benefits to liberalising the law in this area. Personal autonomy and the right to a private life are key considerations for the law in any progressive democracy. Suggestions for changes to the law have included increasing the level of harm that can be consented to There have, however, been a number of cases that have recently reached the UK courts that illustrate the danger of taking too liberal an approach here. In August 2018, Jason Gaskell admitted gross negligence manslaughter after stabbing Laura Huteson in the neck during sadomasochistic sex. In December, Dean Wilkins pleaded guilty to actual body harm after engaging in – what he argued – was consensual S&M. And the trial of John Broadhurst for the murder of his partner – who allegedly died during sadomasochistic sex – continues. Jason Gaskell admitted gross negligence manslaughter after stabbing Laura Huteson in the neck during sadomasochistic sex If we allow consent to negate liability for injuries inflicted during S&M, it could pose additional difficulties for the criminal justice system in convicting abusers. Unpicking whether consent has been freely given can be a difficult task in  these circumstances. Those who engage in S&M are usually careful to respect personal boundaries, but there is, as the Law Lords have suggested, the potential for matters to get out of hand. S&M also necessarily relies on dominance and submission and any consent that is obtained, for example, under duress is not “real” consent. Eroticising violence The popularity of the Fifty Shades of Grey books and films has also prompted commentators to ask whether it is appropriate to talk about “good” or “consensual” BDSM without taking into account the endemic levels of violence against women and the eroticising of that violence in a pornified culture. Perhaps our greatest concern here should be that consent could be used to mask domestic violence and could provide an additional obstacle to claims of domestic abuse. Is it sensible to eroticise violence against women? It is certainly not difficult to imagine abusers arguing that the injuries they have inflicted upon their partner were part of a consensual S&M encounter. This is the problem with too readily allowing consent to negate liability in S&M encounters. In an environment where we recognise the dangers of coercive control and one in three women experience domestic abuse we do need to think very carefully about loosening the reins here. There are many good reasons for revisiting the principle in Brown and updating the law. Those who engage in S&M as part of a healthy sex life should be able to inflict consensual harm without being unfairly criminalised. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”30″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] But we also need to ensure that victims of abuse are protected. This is a delicate balancing act and it’s no surprise that successive governments have been unwilling to address the question of consent in this area. Last month we told how you can buy a BDSM advent calendar this Christmas. [bc_video video_id=”5739147261001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Dominatrix Jenny Nordbak reveals what it is like to work in a BDSM dungeon in Hollywood”] [iframe src=”%3Ciframe%20src%3D%22https%3A%2F%2Fcounter.theconversation.com%2Fcontent%2F108376%2Fcount.gif%3Fdistributor%3Drepublish-lightbox-advanced%22%20width%3D%221%22%20height%3D%221%22%3E%3C%2Fiframe%3E” /]