Santa Cruz

16 Jul 19
Standing-8

  WHO YOU GOT? Current & Past Champions & Top Contenders, Plus Renowned Trainers Make Predictions for Blockbuster Welterweight Championship Showdown Between Eight-Division Champion Manny Pacquiao & Unbeaten WBA Champion Keith Thurman Boxing World Split Nearly 50-50 as 24 Favor Pacquiao While 19 Pick Thurman For Victory PBC on FOX Sports Pay-Per-View Event This Saturday, […]

16 Jul 19
HlaMin

Updated : July 15, 2019 What’s in a name? I introduce myself to non-Burmese as follows: My name is Hla Min. Hla means “handsome” and Min means “king”. My name has two words and six letters. It is interesting to note that my name has been misspelled and mispronounced in more than six ways. They […]

16 Jul 19
Snippets from David

My wife (Lorrie) and I recently visited and explored wine regions in Chile and Argentina.  In Argentina we visited wineries in Mendoza and the Valle de Uco.  In Chile, we visited wineries in the Aconcagua valley (San Felipe), Colchagua valley (Santa Cruz), and Maipo valley (Pirque at the base of the Andes). A South America […]

16 Jul 19
Newsy Today

PG & E Corp. He said he has been working to repair nearly 10,000 problems that have been discovered throughout his electrical systems while adding efforts to prevent his equipment encouraging more wild fires. The company made available on its website the results of accelerated audit processes which began late last year. The company said […]

16 Jul 19
Ordinary Time

Marc Fisher, “Behind Trump’s ‘go back’ demand: A long history of rejecting ‘different’ Americans,” Washington Post, July 15, 2019 https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/behind-trumps-go-back-demand-a-long-history-of-rejecting-different-americans/2019/07/15/aeb4539a-a712-11e9-a3a6-ab670962db05_story.html?fbclid=IwAR05Igu2S1yCqhU3eWruNuKRXDC3KU7WsfcnB6qeVH957wU2bVWkWuECYEA&utm_term=.d39997aaecf8 … President Trump’s raw assertion of nativist language, in attacks Sunday and Monday on four Democratic congresswomen — all of them U.S. citizens, three of them native-born — is consistent not only with his long […]

16 Jul 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
MONTEREY — Reverberations from the national women’s soccer team’s push for equal pay and equal opportunity could be felt at Cal State-Monterey Bay last weekend. On Friday, approximately 150 girls ages 9-18 participated in the Chevron Soccer Academy, a collaboration between the gasoline company and Washington D.C.-based Open Goal Project as an antidote for the current “pay-to-play” model of youth soccer in America. “We see it everywhere,” said Amir Lowery, executive director of the Open Goal Project. “There’s college ID camps, but they’re often around $250. Some people can afford it, but not everyone. For a kid who’s working or trying to help support their family, it’s an extra cost that’s just not going to happen.” Iconic former World Cup player Brandi Chastain signs a ball for campers at the Chevron Soccer Academy for boys and girls at Cal State-Monterey Bay on Friday. The traveling youth camp was established as an antidote to the current “pay-to-play” model of youth soccer in America.Tommy Lau, Chevron/contributed Who better to carry the message that kids can make it on the soccer pitch than Brandi Chastain, the iconic player who 20 years ago became a household name after she celebrated the United States’ victory in the FIFA Women’s World Cup by ripping off her shirt and sprinting around the field in her sports bra? Chastain served as a coach in the program alongside fellow pros Lauren Sesselman, Clarence Goodson, Víctor Bernárdez and Tristan Bowen. Chastain noted the unique training opportunity for all the girls on hand on a cool, foggy afternoon in Monterey. “This is another environment where you can give girls a chance to let go of the restraints in their lives,” Chastain said. “They’ve been told in their community they can’t be fast or strong or take risks. This platform might be the most vital of what Chevron is bringing to these communities. Sometimes, as young women, we’re afraid to really go for things. If we’re not perfect, we don’t want to try. It’s really important that we tell these girls that it’s OK to miss, but it’s also OK to make it.” Iconic former World Cup player Brandi Chastain is introduced to campers at the Chevron Soccer Academy for boys and girls at Cal State-Monterey Bay on Friday. The traveling youth camp was established as an antidote to the current “pay-to-play” model of youth soccer in America.Tommy Lau, Chevron/contributed About 300 boys and girls attended the three-day camp. Chevron and Open Goal Project have staged these camps in areas that may not have adequate representation at the collegiate and national soccer levels. The Monterey camp was their fourth such partnership. Previous sites included Fresno, Bakersfield and Los Angeles. Players for the Monterey camp came from cities such as Watsonville, which has high schools that have thrived in soccer yet have failed to produce a representative number of collegiate and professional players. Chevron communications adviser Leah Casey said she hopes that this event will combat that problem in areas such as Watsonville. “This event is important to us because it gives kids who may come from under-resourced communities a great opportunity,” Casey said. “What we’re seeing more and more in soccer is that those kids who have the means and the time can play at higher levels of play, and we feel that this is an opportunity for kids at all levels, regardless of family income, to get the necessary skills to advance in soccer and learn about STEM.” Campers at the Chevron Soccer Academy for boys and girls at Cal State-Monterey Bay scrimmage Sunday, July 14, 2019. The traveling youth camp, which featured an appearance by iconic former World Cup player Brandi Chastain, was established as an antidote to the current “pay-to-play” model of youth soccer in America.Tommy Lau, Chevron/contributed In addition to hands-on soccer instruction, several educational and training booths were set up on site emphasizing science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Examples of included kick-velocity, shot-accuracy and agility trackers. Though the game of soccer is often mistakenly viewed as being relatively simple, Chastain noted how the scientific side of soccer is an undervalued yet essential aspect of the beautiful game. “We’re talking about things like how fast the ball travels, how fast you can run and even how the surface you play on alters the friction of the ball to either slow the ball down or accelerate it,” Chastain said. “There’s a lot of thinking happening out here. Soccer’s not a game for dummies, per say. It’s a completely cerebral game. You have to be constantly thinking, so we’re challenging the kids here to not only kick the ball and run, but make decisions and evaluate speed and distance.” In addition to changing the way soccer players think about the way they approach the game, Chevron and the Open Goal Project hope that providing an entertaining platform to learn about STEM subjects will promote interest for academic fields that often are predominantly filled with men. Former pro soccer players Clarence Goodson, center, and Víctor Bernárdez, center back, pal around with campers at the Chevron Soccer Academy for boys and girls at Cal State-Monterey Bay on Friday. The traveling youth camp, which featured an appearance by iconic former World Cup player Brandi Chastain, was established as an antidote to the current “pay-to-play” model of youth soccer in America.Tommy Lau, Chevron/contributed “This camp is our way of giving back,” Casey said. “It gives us a way to introduce kids to the game of soccer, as well as STEM, in a fun and exciting way. It’s really important to give these kids the opportunity to think about the science behind the sport they love. It’s been really great, and hopefully it’ll inspire them to think a little bit deeper about their soccer careers and their professional careers.” In the wake of the U.S.’s victory in the 2019 Women’s World Cup, talk of wage disparity between male and female athletes has become a national topic of discussion. Though this camp is primarily focused on finding ways to get boys and girls of all walks of life playing, there’s no denying the impact of the American women’s teams’ success. “We’re excited, and it’s not just because we won the game,” Chastain said. “I think what happens when our team is successful is that we have a chance to stand on a really strong platform, and people will listen. We’ve been talking about equal pay with the national team for a long time, especially with the 1999 team. This isn’t a new concept. Even though it feels really new to a lot of people and the general public, we didn’t have social media back then to share this message, but it’s happening now. Because this year’s team won, they get to continue the journey to make sure that young girls like the ones at this camp and the generation after them have a place where people will value them for what they’re bringing, not who they are.”
16 Jul 19
jamiegrace

Before attending the CFC-Y Conference (https://thejamiegrace.wordpress.com/2019/07/15/onward/), I went around California from June 25-July 5 with my friend Ashlen. I have traveled to many places before and this was not my first time in California. But, since I am older now, there was more flexibility with time and I got to do things that my parents […]

16 Jul 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
The Aptos High girls basketball program will be under the guidance of its third head coach in as many years this winter as the school announced Bruce Funk will replace Chris Grieves. Grieves coached one season for the Mariners (23-7, 9-1) but left the standard high. He led the team to a Santa Cruz Coast Athletic League Tournament title after tying Soquel for the regular-season crown, garnering him the league’s Coach of the Year award. He also guided Aptos to the Central Coast Section Division III championship and a CIF D-II state appearance. Bruce Funk, the coach at Pleasanton’s Foothill High the past seven years, will become the third coach in as many season for the Aptos High girls basketball team.Contributed Funk has a long history of both playing and coaching basketball. He was a Hall of Fame player at Ohlone College before earning a scholarship to play at Eastern New Mexico University. Most recently he coached the Foothill High girls team in Pleasanton. In his seven years with the program, he won more than 100 games and led his team to the North Coast Section playoffs five times. Funk, who practices criminal law in San Jose, moved to Aptos this year with the intention of continuing to coach at Foothill. When he saw the Aptos job posted, however, he applied. “(Aptos) is a successful program and I got to watch last year’s team on film and they have several returning players who are excellent,” Funk said. “The facilities are top-notch and the administration is supportive.” Funk, who follows Grieves and Stefan Hocom before that, said he doesn’t plan on allowing the Mariners to continue their trend of having a new coach every year. “I hope to bring stability to the program in the sense to be here long term and continue the success the team has had over the last three seasons,” he said. “I want to also bring a fresh approach on how to play.” Chris Grieves coached the Aptos High girls basketball team for one year, garnering SCCAL Coach of the Year honors and leading the Mariners to a CCS Division III title. He will be replaced this season by Bruce Funk, a former coach at Foothill High in Pleasanton. (Dan Coyro — Santa Cruz Sentinel file) Funk is coordinating with the Travis Fox, Aptos’ new athletic director, to organize a team meeting next week so he can meet his players. Among those expected to return are all-SCCAL first-team players Gabby Giuffre and Natalia Ackerman, who is committed to play for NCAA Division I Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo. All-league honorable mention players Rylee Mennie and twins Madison and Emma Stefanini area also expected to return. Funk said he believes building trust in his players is essential to creating a successful program. “In any new situation, the first step is reaching out to the girls and asking what they hope to accomplish,” he said. “It’s important to see what’s successful for them and being able to (relate) to them to continue the success. Having an honest dialogue, setting boundaries and accepting the things I want to accomplish will create a successful team.”
16 Jul 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
I think we’ve all been here. My first day working in an architect’s office, I was assigned the task of drafting a floor plan from a sketch for a home addition. I gave myself a large margin on the right, and began to draw toward the left to avoid smudging my work. Just as I realized my generous margin hadn’t left enough room on the page for the entire plan, the boss walked over to check on my progress. I tried to think of something to say, but he was a fast reader, having been at this work for 35 years. “The first line you put on the page is the most important line,” he said, “so think before you draw.” Artists at the Tannery altered their environments. The authorities were upset. Having studied architecture at an art school, this was not front page news to me. If you have ever driven a car, ridden a bike or crossed a street, you know that creative adaptation keeps the world spinning round. There’s not a building in Santa Cruz that was built strictly according to plan or code, and they all evolve with time and use. That’s why the first line — the essential intent of a project — is so important. As the twig is bent, so forever grows the tree. The Tannery Arts Center was a willful mistake. It was the wrong project in the wrong place at the wrong time. We were still digging Pacific Avenue out from under an earthquake. The original Longs/Zanotto redevelopment zone — that suburban sprawl between our nascent arts and entertainment district and the river’s edge — was begging to become the creative heart of our downtown. And, then as now, we were feeling the consequences of university growth and our own no-growth policies. But none of that mattered. We just followed the money, as all municipalities do. We upgraded from regional chain stores cutting us off from the river, to national ones, and doubled down on our dependence on high-traffic sales tax revenue, even though it meant fewer downtown residents, local businesses, and more cars. And we used up many years’ worth of housing and transportation funds to quarantine healthy, college-educated urbanites a half-mile and a highway intersection away from the real life of our city, at the cost of a half-million dollars an artist. Why? We were told that artists were good for business and that cultural tourism was a gravy train worth subsidizing. That’s proved itself an extremely dubious first line. When done right, art is a struggle, not a distraction. Following the money led us directly to today’s conundrum. Funding sources required units with multiple bedrooms. The studios were long and narrow, stacked along a single loaded corridor. The only windows were at one end. But bedrooms require windows, unless they are not legally bedrooms. The architects proved themselves too clever by half. If the walls didn’t go more than half-way to the ceiling — think office cubicles — they wouldn’t be walls and the spaces wouldn’t be legal bedrooms requiring windows. So studios had one, two or three sleeping cubicles, with no real privacy in any of them. Try raising a family in that, or just having housemates for that matter, and you’ll understand why so many artists got out their hammers, and why so many officials shrugged their shoulders and turned blind eyes. That is, until some righteous or naive inspector remarked out loud that the emperor had no clothes, and this sorry house of cards got downgraded to ghost ship status in the press, and we should probably start thinking about an adaptive reuse for the site. If you’re wondering how civic projects materialize, whether they be wharf improvements or libraries in parking structures, it pretty much boils down to following the money, whether it’s funding or tax revenue. Vibrant, resilient cities rise from a very different foundation, one in which the first line is always a question, not just an opportunity. Who are we, and how do we get better at it? If artists didn’t have hammers, they wouldn’t be artists. Mark Primack can be reached at mark@markprimack.com. Contributions to the Elizabeth Butler Home/Studio Fund can be made at Lighthouse Bank.
16 Jul 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
For 80 years visitors have flocked to the Amador County town of Volcano to marvel at one of life’s simple pleasures: Daffodils springing forth after a long winter to welcome the sun. But as Daffodil Hill grew — to 300,000 blooms many years — so did its appeal as a tourist attraction. And now it’s become a victim of its own success. The owners announced Monday on Facebook that they are closing the Hill “indefinitely.” “While we, the Ryan family, have enjoyed sharing our serene and peaceful Daffodil Hill with the general public, it is with deep sadness that we announce our decision to close the Hill indefinitely. “This decision is the most difficult that we, as a family, have ever made. The generations that came before us who purchased this property in 1887, which evolved into Daffodil Hill, could never have envisioned that their efforts would have ever grown into such a beloved attraction.” In a story first reported by KCRA.com, the Ryans said that the limited road infrastructure and parking lots “created liability and safety concerns for everyone involved.” The post continues: “Due to the thousands of visitors on our opening weekend in 2019, the local road system to our Hill became so congested that the wait just to get to our parking area sometimes took as long as two hours. As a result, many visitors chose to park their vehicles along the narrow roadways and walk through traffic to the Hill, which was a risky endeavor in itself. In addition, these vehicles were parked illegally on the roadway, which, along with the pedestrians, would have impeded any emergency vehicles that needed to access the Hill area to assist our Shake Ridge Road neighbors, or you, our visitors. “Despite our best efforts, the volume of visitors was just too much for the roadways, the Hill itself, and there is simply not enough space for everyone to park.” The family noted that they have considered shuttles and a reservations system but decided in the end that the “narrows roads and the Hill property infrastructure cannot be changed.” Admission  and parking were always free on the Hill. The descendants of the McLaughlins, who purchased the property in 1887, depended on donations from visitors to help pay for the 8,000 new bulbs needed each year. Most years the Hill opened when 25 percent of the bulbs were in bloom and closed when 25 percent of the flowers were left. The decision’s impact on Amador County tourism was acknowledged by the Ryans, who said they would have no further comment about the shutdown. “We hope our visitors, who have experienced the beauty and friendliness of Amador County, will continue to return often to support our local economy.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] They went on to thank their volunteers, the garden caretakers and the California Highway Patrol. And then they ended with a note of gratitude to the thousands of visitors: “Our entire family, all six generations, sends each and every one of you a heartfelt “Thank You” for all the kind words of support, your patronage, and appreciation of the Hill over these many years. “As we close this wonderful chapter in our family history, we ask that you honor our ancestors by continuing to appreciate Mother Nature in all her glory whenever and wherever you can.”