Santa Cruz

18 Feb 19
Archy Worldys

FEBRUARY February 14: Tokyo, Japan Hiroaki Teshigawara vs. Yuki Iriguchi, 12 rounds, junior feather weights Kenichi Horikawa vs Satoru Todaka, 10 rounds, junior junior flyweights February 15: Hinckley, Minn. (ESPN / ESPN deportes) Rob Brant vs. Khasan Baysangurov, 12 rounds, middleweights Joshua Greer vs. Joshua Greer Giovanni Escaner, 10 laps, Bantamweights Mikaela Mayer vs. Yareli […]

18 Feb 19
nancyland.com

The removable Sea House Conservatory plexiglass and faux iron beam roof is assembled. It is supported by iron pillars and wood siding painted N-C16 Midnight Stroll by Clark+Kensington. I made new finials from wooden beads and toothpicks. Where the two corner beams met the center beam and roof ridge there was an inelegant gap, so […]

18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Stephen Curry received the first glimpse on what life may be like playing without Klay Thompson and Kevin Durant. “Team LeBron” finished with a 178-164 victory over “Team Giannis” in Sunday’s All-Star game, as his Warriors teammates played a key part in spoiling Curry’s homecoming. After Team Giannis led by 13 at halftime and as many as 18 points, Team James went on a second-half surge that featured Durant and Thompson. Durant had 31 points while shooting efficiently from the field (10-of-15), from 3 (6-of-9) and from the free-throw line (5-of-5) to win his second All-Star MVP after also winning it in 2012. Durant became the fifth Warriors’ All-Star MVP, including Paul Arizin (1952), Wilt Chamberlain (1960) and Rick Barry (1967). “It’s all sweet to me. It’s hard to rank,” Durant said. “Everything is special. But it was cool to be out there with the best players in the game. Keep trying to rack them up, I guess.” Thompson added 20 points while shooting 7-of-16 from the field and 6-of-12 from long in 22 minutes off the bench in his fifth consecutive All-Star stint. Meanwhile, Curry did not offer a kind of performance that left an an undeniable impression at Charlotte Christian, Davidson and the Warriors. He had 17 points while shooting 6-of-23 from the field and 4-of-17 from 3. Curry added nine rebounds, seven assists and ended the game bouncing the ball on the ground and finishing with a reverse dunk. But that also punctuated another struggling All-Star performance.  Curry entered Sunday’s game a surprising trend with sluggish All-Star stints in which he shot a combined 32-of-78 (41 percent) in first five appearances. With Durant and Thompson teaming up with LeBron James (19 points), that naturally brought up questions on whether James selected those players partly to recruit them when they become free agents next summer. Durant has insisted he has not decided, though plenty in NBA circles believe he will sign with the New York Knicks for a bigger role and business portfolio. Thompson has often insisted he has not reason to leave the Warriors because of his three NBA titles, team-oriented culture and talent around him. Instead, Durant and Thompson let their play do the talking. “He’s hitting back shot after shot. That’s the most important thing,” Damian Lillard said of Durant. “From being around him, you just see that he’s a regular dude. You hear people saying ‘he’s sensitive’ and those types of things. He comes off pretty genuine to me.” Even if Curry did not shoot well, he still found reasons to feel joyful during his return here. When he heard his name in starting lineup introductions. When he defended against his Warriors teammates Durant and Thompson, both of which resulted in misses. When he threw a hard bounce pass for a lob that only teammate Giannis Antetokounmpo could execute. Later, Thompson nailed a 3-pointer over Curry. Then Curry sank a 3 after Thompson fouled him and sent him flying to his seats. “That was so fun to see,” Durant said. “Those guys are always joking around and seeing who can make the most shots. Their chemistry together is second to none. We know we’re going to talk about those two plays for the next couple of days. It was cool to Steph stepping up and knocking down that shot over Klay because he’s always talking trash to him.” Most of the attention centered, though, on Durant and winning an All-Star MVP six years after collecting his first one. “The first time is always sweeter,” Durant said. “I didn’t come in these games expecting to do anything. It just kind of happened.”
18 Feb 19
Ben There, Done That

I had to be up early to get my boat to Isabela. I’m glad I was too. I arrived at the meeting point to find the guy I was supposed to meet wasn’t in his office. I sat around for a few nervous minutes before he eventually showed up and took me to the dock. […]

18 Feb 19
Fernando Galvan

The Premier Boxing Champions series had another show this Saturday showcasing featherweight champion Leo Santa Cruz in the main event. It also featured up and coming Omar Figueroa Jr. against savvy veteran John Molina Jr. John Molina Jr. and Omar Figueroa Jr. gave the fans their money worth when they stood toe to toe for […]

18 Feb 19
MoBlog

My name is Edgar Armando Molina Hernández, I live in Santa Cruz Atizapan, I like music, go to parties, get to know new places, go on a trip, I have problems making friends, I love to try the gastronomy of different places, I love animals, especially cats, I love being in open places where you […]

18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
After days of rain, blue skies and sunshine are seen through the tops of the tall redwood trees Sunday afternoon at Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park near Felton. For Santa Cruz, the weather is expected to be sunny Monday and Tuesday with a high of 55. There is a chance that rain will return Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service. (Michael Todd — Santa Cruz Sentinel)
18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Asylum seekers need a safe place to stay pending asylum or removal hearings. Every faith community in the country is called to shelter them. Some, especially in border communities, have already responded to the call. Now we must multiply. Despite Trump’s new restrictions (limiting the numbers allowed to apply for asylum each day, ending temporary protected status for refugees from places like Haiti and El Salvador, re-defining people fleeing domestic and gang violence as “ineligible” for refugee status, and requiring many refugees who make it through this gauntlet to stay in Mexico awaiting their asylum hearing) hundreds of asylum seekers are still being deposited in U.S. border communities daily. These are mothers (sometimes pregnant) or couples with small children. They are hungry, dirty and tired; destitute and traumatized by their journey. They have already passed a “well-founded fear of persecution” interview with border patrol agents. Some have family who can host them while they await the hearings that will grant or deny asylum or deportation. Some have no-one. What do they need? First of all, a bed. A safe place to recover from their harrowing journey. A secure room, a mattress or two, access to a shower and a toilet and a sink and laundry: this is luxury. Beyond this they need help to enroll children in school, connect with legal aid and health care. Most of all, they need welcoming arms. U.S. border communities, and especially faith communities, have responded all inspired by the same spirit of compassion. Typically anchoring such a network is one faith community or other organization able to dedicate some space to a “welcoming center.” There, volunteers and guests train and connect with one another. Volunteers welcome new arrivals, meet their immediate needs for shelter and care and help them move on to host families elsewhere or place them locally in donated space. At the heart of each such network are a few dedicated volunteers, often retirees, who work tirelessly to shelter these families. Just as important, perhaps essential, is what might be called the moral leader: perhaps a minister or a nun, perhaps a lay leader, perhaps a secular activist, inspired by and able to express and bless and nurture and help to grow the spirit of compassion that drives this work. None of this works without sponsors able to make living space available to one or more asylum-seeking refugee families. It is a task best taken on as a collective act of care by a team of volunteers embedded in a faith community or other community association. But these networks are also fragile and weak, overwhelmed by the scale and depth of the needs to which they respond. This work is concentrated in border communities only because those are the places flooded with refugees. But similarly compassionate people can be found in every American community. So we who live elsewhere, who witness all this trauma from a distance, now have a part to play. We can gather, discover and develop within and among us our own aspiration to care for refugees, reach out to welcoming centers on our southern border, and through them invite families with nowhere else to go to come to us. We can help our own communities welcome them. Of course we already face our own urgent needs, including sheltering the homeless in our communities: comparatively speaking, a much bigger challenge. Some community organizations, public agencies and faith communities are already devoting their energies to this work, and we are called to do more. Will we pit these two human needs against one another? Or will we follow the lead of our border communities and also open our doors, and our hearts, to asylum seeking families? Paul Johnston is a retired sociologist at UC Santa Cruz. He is a volunteer in the Safe Harbors network (www.safeharbors.net) and can be contacted at ptjohnst@ucsc.edu.
18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Mayor Watkins, at last Tuesday’s City Council meeting, I was not alone in believing you made a mistake by not putting on the agenda the proposal previously sent to you by Council persons Glover, Krohn and Brown. Of course, councilmembers and all of us make mistakes and occasionally contribute to a tense environment. I believe, however, you could have lessened “tension” (Santa Cruz Sentinel: “Tension mounts between leaders,”) had you admitted your mistake; or accepted your colleagues’ feelings and moved on. However, following Tuesday night’s difficult, emotional and challenging meeting I am going to, perhaps, surprise you. I am not wanting to address you regarding homelessness – about which I feel passionately. Rather, I am writing you a letter of thanks and encouragement for the difficult, often terribly complex process that you, our public servants have to endure, particularly in the present national climate of a mistrust in government, polarization and political dysfunction. We live in a time of passionate truths for what we as individuals hold to be “right,” or “wrong,” — “good,” or “evil.” However, the greatest truth is that we emotional, complex individuals are most wise when we acknowledge that rarely what we perceive as true is absolute. As a ’61 UCLA “Freedom Rider,” I learned many things in serving 39 days at Parchman Penitentiary in Mississippi. One of the most important, almost inspirational, was that our “redneck”adversaries, even our prison guards were occasionally compassionate. On one occasion they even initiated a dialogue with us. Of course, there are those whose perception of reality is so warped by emotional illness that their view of truth has to be confronted as unacceptable. For example, on the one year anniversary of the Stoneman Douglas High School murders, there is one Alex Jones, a conspiracy theorist who claims that the mass killing of 20 first graders and six educators was staged by paid actors who faked the murders. Fortunately, for the sake of truth, a Connecticut judge has ruled that Alex Jones must undergo a sworn deposition in the defamation case rightly brought against him by the families of the slain children. Members of our City Council, would you not agree, however, that except in clear examples of insane behavior as with Jones, when we really get to know others we come to appreciate the truth that the actions of most, even our adversaries, are not meant to intentionally hurt us. As seen in the Sentinel article by Jessica York, you in government are particularly vulnerable to the limelight of your actions, where so many are unable to see you as fellow human beings who act based on your individual perceptions of truth. If I may suggest, the answer to mitigating “tension” between you “leaders,” as with all of us is to try to get to know each other better. What makes you tick — what feelings bring you joy and fulfillment? What feelings bring you pain and despair? In sharing our feelings in a respectful way, we are more capable of empathizing with each other, so as to judge others’ truths less harshly. Lastly, as you showed more or less on Tuesday, be patient and honor each others character and try to love your fellow council person as yourself. And, know that the majority of us admire you for your willingness and courage to take on the task of government. And we citizens? Our task is to be passionate for our truths, while giving you the benefit of doubt that while you have legitimate egos and passions, you sincerely want to effect more compassion, justice, and equity for we, your constituents.
18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
SANTA CRUZ — Better-for-you food and beverage companies are a “hot investment,” according to Aaron Hinde, co-founder of the functional beverage company LifeAid. In a statistic quoted in Healthline Media, the American Heart Association states that men should not consume more than 37.5 grams of sugar per day, and women should not consume more than 25 grams per day. In comparison, a 12-ounce can of Red Bull has 39 grams of sugar; a 12-ounce can of LifeAid has 9 grams and uses natural ingredients. According to Hinde, 70 percent of people now look at a label before they consume something. When the company started, he said that wasn’t the norm. LifeAid was founded in 2011 in Santa Cruz. Both Santa Cruz natives, co-founders Hinde and Orion Melehan met at a CrossFit gym in 2009 and bonded over their frustration of the limited healthy and useful food and drink options for exercise and recovery. “Instead of having a ‘one size fits all’ approach with 20 different flavor profiles, we did the exact opposite where we created different blends to support different lifestyles,” Hinde said. “We’re targeted in our market.” He said that while testing in a grocery store, it would be inefficient to offer a sample to everyone that comes by. LifeAid offers six different drinks: LifeAid for daily health, FitAid for workout recovery, FocusAid for work, ImmunityAid for a stronger immune system, PartyAid for party recovery and GolferAid for golf performance. ImmunityAid is the newest drink and Melehan said he expects it to be there No. 2 or No. 3 drink. FitAid and FocusAid rank No. 1 and No. 2, according to company spokesperson Arthur Gallego. LifeAid offers six functional drinks to use on different occasion: LifeAid, FitAid, ImmunityAid, GolferAid, FocusAid and PartyAid. Contributed: Elaine Ingalls- Santa Cruz Sentinel) LifeAid has 67 employees nationwide and more than 30 in Santa Cruz at its headquarters, 2833 Mission St. The company also sells drinks in 22 different countries. “We want to really stand true to what Santa Cruz is all about, great clean functional products for active lifestyles,” Hinde said. LifeAid is on its way to selling in all Nob Hill Foods, 11 of 13 Safeway divisions nationwide and approximately 4,300 Walmarts with a grocery component. Hinde said distributing at Shopper’s Corner, Deluxe Foods, New Leaf and other local stores created the sell story for bigger retailers. The company has a number of goals for 2019. Melehan said he and Hinde want to expand headcount and transition from wholesale distribution to direct-store distribution. He said in terms of revenue, the company is growing more than 50 percent per year on average. He expects an average of 2.5 million cans sold per month this year, up from last year’s 1.75 million sold per month. Melehan said LifeAid has seven warehouses nationwide: three leased warehouses in Santa Cruz, Oregon and Pennsylvania and four others are contracted. The company has a number of goals for 2019. Melehan said he and Hinde want to expand headcount, dip their toes into convenience store sales and transition from wholesale distribution to direct-store distribution. Hinde said this will be the first year where brick-and-mortar exceeds online business. Sales were 100 percent e-commerce a few years ago and last year was 50/50 physical sales and online sales, he said. Hinde said they knew to get a mass of brand awareness and equity online and then consumers would recognize it on retail shelves. “Convenience is the only channel to conquest,” Melehan said. “Wherever we go in, we want to make sure we win.” LifeAid sells at gyms, CrossFit events, natural/specialty stores, drug and grocery stores and is branching out to convenience stores. Melehan said in the next five years, the company aspires to reach $200 million in sales. “You have to hydrate, it’s not an option,” Hinde said. “Having clean, nutritional blends, these functional blends in cans, we can really have a positive effect on people’s health.” Information: visit www.lifeaidbevco.com or call 888-558-1113.
18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
The “Green New Deal” is upon us, and the question is what to make of it. The Democratic proposal mandates that, within a decade, virtually all fossil fuels — which represent about four-fifths of the nation’s energy supply — shall be replaced with clean fuels that don’t worsen global warming. Just how is this task to be accomplished? The main sponsors of the Green New Deal — Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass. — don’t say. The difficulties are made apparent by new projections of energy use between 2017 and 2050 by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Over these years, the EIA expects the U.S. population to grow by 19 percent to 389 million, while the American economy expands by roughly 90 percent. There will be more vehicles, homes and offices. To prevent fossil-fuel use from expanding requires the substitution of clean fuels (wind, solar, nuclear) or greater efficiencies in energy use. To put it mildly, this seems a tall order. Nevertheless, the EIA thinks it is possible with current policies. In 2050, projected U.S. carbon dioxide emissions (5 billion metric tons) are slightly below today’s U.S. emissions (5.1 billion metric tons). Why? Car gasoline mileage improves substantially, pushed by government regulations. Natural gas continues to displace coal in electricity generation, lowering CO2 emissions. But these gains don’t satisfy the requirements of the Green New Deal. It decrees “a 10-year national mobilization,” comparable to the commitment to win World War II, to eliminate all greenhouse gases. The trouble is that the technology doesn’t seem to exist to win this war without causing the economy to collapse. This is the crux of the matter. Do a thought experiment, urges David Hart of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a Washington think tank. For the sake of argument, let’s assume that the Green New Deal achieves its stated goals over a decade. So what? asks Hart in a blog post. Other countries will continue emitting, and the technologies that work in the United States won’t necessarily work elsewhere. “Until low-carbon energy is cheaper than high-carbon energy for the bulk of the globe’s energy needs, the pace of global emissions will not slow down very much,” he says. The emphasis, he argues, needs to be on research and development and the faster introduction of superior technologies. To be fair, some gains in de-carbonizing the economy can be easily achieved. A starting tax of $25 a ton on carbon dioxide — which would rise slightly faster than inflation — would hasten the retirement of coal-fired power plants, says Adele Morris, policy director of the Climate and Energy Economics Project at the Brookings Institution, another think tank. What’s not well appreciated is that the Green New Deal also would require a host of non-energy changes. As Howard Gleckman of the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center notes, it is “an ambitious manifesto demanding — among other things — a massive infrastructure initiative, a guaranteed job with a ‘family-sustaining wage,’ and universal access to high-quality health care, affordable housing, economic security, high-quality education, and healthy food.” Granting the usual congressional penchant for exaggeration, this is still over the top. Most of it is make-believe. No one knows how much the program would cost. Gleckman says it would be “staggering.” The total would easily run into trillions. We’ve been here before, as the eminent U.S. historian Richard Hofstadter once pointed out: “We go off on periodic psychic sprees that purport to be moral crusades … [to] wipe out the saloon and liquor forever … [or to] destroy the political machine and put an end to corruption, or achieve absolute, total and final security against war. … Very often [these evils do exist] … and something can be done about them. [But our enthusiasm] often wanders over the border between reality and impossibility.” This is surely true of the Green New Deal.
18 Feb 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
SALT LAKE CITY — The future of Caltrain is taking shape in a gusty sagebrush plain formerly owned by the Mormon Church with a dramatic view of the snow-covered Oquirrh Mountains. A massive new production facility designed to rebuild Caltrain’s fleet has sprouted up here over the last few months, the backbone of one of the biggest upgrades in the commuter railway’s 155-year-history. The $2 billion electrification project is replacing most of Caltrain’s trains and putting up electric wires along the 51-mile track from San Francisco to San Jose’s Tamien station. Once it’s complete, proponents say, the difference between the new electric trains and the current diesel ones will be like Teslas versus gas guzzlers: nimbler, smoother and far more energy efficient. “We want to convince people to leave their cars at home,” said Martin Ritter, the U.S. chief executive of Stadler, the Swiss company that’s building the trains. The future of rail in California got a jolt last week when newly elected Gov. Gavin Newsom said he was scaling down ambitions for the state’s San Francisco-to-Los Angeles bullet train, focusing on a Merced-to-Bakersfield section for the near future. The Caltrain electrification project would allow the rapid trains to share its tracks up the Peninsula, and the state’s high-speed rail agency committed $741 million to the project, with the rest coming from local and federal funds. The Salt Lake City production facility of Swiss train company Stadler, which is replacing 75 percent of Caltrain’s diesel train fleet with faster and greener electrified trains. (Courtesy of Stadler Rail) But even now that bullet trains may not reach the Bay Area anytime soon, Caltrain’s electrification funding is unaffected — and the project is currently on budget and on schedule, with service planned to start in 2022. Caltrain is the largest U.S. contract yet for Stadler, which has built trains for railways around the world, including the new biodiesel trains on BART’s extension to Antioch (which were made in Switzerland). The company’s leaders call their Salt Lake City plant an investment in the prediction that increasingly congested American cities will need to build more of the public transit that’s common in European capitals. The Bay Area is a perfect example. The region’s most important highways are sluggish every rush hour, and the traffic is getting worse — by 2040, an additional 1.2 million people will be living within two miles of Caltrain stations along the San Francisco Peninsula. At the same time, more than half of Caltrain’s passenger cars, as well as two-thirds of its locomotives, are already past their retirement age, requiring costly extra maintenance. The electrification project is aimed at getting more people to ride the rail. The new trains will still run at 79 mph, the same as the current maximum speed, but they’ll be much faster at stopping and starting. That means they can fit in more stops in less time. [cq comment=”ADD GRAPHIC HERE”] The upgraded trains also will feature free WiFi, an electric outlet at almost every seat, more luggage space and improved digital signage. Each train still will have multiple bike cars, although only one bathroom. Another plus: The ride will be a lot smoother than today’s sometimes bone-shaking experience, thanks to the electric acceleration and special air cushioning around the wheels. Signs of progress were clear on a recent afternoon at Stadler’s Salt Lake City facility. Six bright and shiny red-and-white train cars stood out on the assembly floor, skeletons waiting to be filled with the guts of the train’s interior. Workers in bright orange vests aimed laser trackers to mark locations for bolts and screws and started to install stairs and other components. Even as the work progressed, construction continued on the facility itself, which includes a massive warehouse for hundreds of train parts and special rooms to work on different pieces of the new trains. Big Swiss and U.S. flags hung from the walls. “In March last year, we literally had cows grazing out here,” said Jacob Splan, the energetic construction manager, as he gave a whirlwind tour of the sprawling plant. “It’s a mad dash right now to finish it.” A view inside the shell of a new Caltrain train at the Salt Lake City production facility of Swiss train company Stadler. (Casey Tolan/Bay Area News Group) The car shells make an impressive journey from Stadler’s factory in Altenrhein, Switzerland: They’re trucked to Basel, boated down the Rhine River to Antwerp, shipped across the Atlantic to Houston and then delivered via rail to Salt Lake City. When the trains are done here, they’ll weigh about 45 tons. Massive yellow cranes built into the facility’s 64.5-foot-tall roof will lift them onto built-in rail tracks, and they’ll start their trip on a train bed to the Bay Area. Closer to home, crews already are installing 3,000 new electric poles along the tracks to power the trains. There will be some service changes on weekends and evenings across the route through next year. Once the project is done, Caltrain will be an exception — electrified trains account for less than 1 percent of railroad tracks in the U.S., compared to roughly a third around the world, according to researchers. A crane lifting one Caltrain train shell over another at Stadler’s Salt Lake City facility. (Courtesy of Stadler Rail) The Utah plant represents a big reason that Caltrain’s electrification project is actually going forward. Soon after President Trump took office in 2017, his administration delayed the final sign-off on $647 million in federal funds for the effort, even though it had passed almost the entire approval process under President Obama’s Department of Transportation. Democratic leaders protested the holdup, accusing the president of trying to get back at a state that voted heavily against him. California Republicans argued that the project was a wasteful way of boosting the high-speed rail project. But some of Caltrain’s biggest champions were Utah’s GOP officials, including then-Senate President Pro Tem Orrin Hatch, who supported the project for its economic impact here. Caltrain is expected to create more than 500 jobs in Utah and more in a dozen other states. The federal Department of Transportation approved the grant in May 2017. “It wasn’t just blue California but really suppliers across the country” that benefit from the project, said Casey Fromson, Caltrain’s government affairs director. “That was a pretty powerful argument.” Why Salt Lake City? Utah has a big logistics and transportation industry, and Stadler also is receiving generous tax incentives from the city and the state. Thanks to the Mormon Church’s wide-ranging missionary program, the region also has a lot of bilingual people — German and English can both be heard on the factory floor. And the folks from Switzerland feel at home among the mountain peaks and snow of the Salt Lake Valley region. “It looks almost the same to me,” said Christoph Brocker, the project manager, who had worked on similar train projects in Austria and Switzerland before coming to the U.S. to build Caltrains. One difference between working in Switzerland and Utah: “Don’t ask your people to come to work on a Sunday here — they won’t show up,” Brocker said. “But they’ll work twice as hard on a Saturday.”
18 Feb 19
Charon Salon Services

  Huey Percy Newton (February 17, 1942 – August 22, 1989) was a revolutionary African-American political activist who, along with Bobby Seale, co-founded the Black Panther Party in 1966. In 1945, the Newton family migrated to Oakland, California, as part of the second wave of the Great Migration of African Americans out of the South, with most going […]