Sarah Louise

15 Jul 19
The Scottish Sun
THE WIVES and girlfriends of England’s cricket stars revelled in Sunday’s magnificent World Cup win with a series of heartfelt Instagram posts. Those players accompanied by their loved ones at Lord’s made sure to thank them for playing their part in the stunning victory. Elle and Jason Roy enjoy the moment with baby Everly A win sealed with a kiss Eoin Morgan, Ben Stokes, Jason Roy, Joe Root and more were pictured embracing their partners on the pitch. And the Wags paid tribute to their beloveds’ amazing achievements via social media. Having lost the toss, England were made to field first and restricted New Zealand to 241. After equalling the Black Caps’ score in dramatic circumstances, the hosts held their nerve in the super over to win courtesy of their boundaries total. Tara Morgan, wife of captain Eoin, wrote: “Could not possibly be prouder!! “It has been four long years, what a finish!!” Fashion marketer Tara with hubbie Eoin and the trophy Mrs Morgan joked of emotional breakdowns after the win For opening bastman Roy, the chance to share the moment on the Lord’s turf with young daughter Everly was a special one. Before the tournament, he told Sun Sport of his horror at finding the baby girl “lifeless” in bed and the through-the-night hospital trip that ensued when she was struck by a stomach infection. The opener cuddles his daughter at Lord’s Roy takes a good look at the trophy with his wife and baby The ICC selected Roy for their Team of the Tournament Clare Stokes, partner of man of the match Ben, wrote online: “Bursting with pride! What a day!!! “I have no more words!!” Among the most heartfelt moments was the Stokes’ embrace after his role in the super over. And Clare has posted a number of pictures of the Wags squad, captioning one “girl power!” after the semi-final beating of Australia. Ben proud as punch with Clare after receiving his medal The 28-year-old celebrates with kids Layton and Libby Clare basks in the nation’s joy Hugging in the pavilion The couple pose for a selfie on the pitch View this post on Instagram Girl Power! ✌🏼 A post shared by Clare (@clarey11) on Jul 11, 2019 at 1:42pm PDT England were favourites going into the tournament but the pressure of hosting it sprouted on a number of times. Group stage defeats to Pakistan, Australia and Sri Lanka crystallised fans’ fears it would all go wrong at their big moment. But two stirring performances versus India and New Zealand in the groups sent them to the final-four, where they demolished the Aussies before Sunday’s epic showdown. Sarah Wood, wife of fast bowler Mark, added on Instagram: “I couldn’t be prouder.” Sarah celebrating with Mark and his winners’ medal The Woods pose with the trophy Jos Buttler posing with wife Louise and daughter Georgia [article-rail-section title=”Most Read Cricket News” posts_category=”22″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”popular” /] Summing up the nation’s mood on Monday was Joe Root’s wife, Carrie. She posted a photo of her lunchtime coffee with the caption: “Now what?!” Joe and Carrie Root at Lord’s as the sun sets The star batsman embraces his wife Chris Woakes shares the moment with wife Amie As well as a World Cup trophy, the couple also have a daughter, Laila In fact, England now have the small matter of the Ashes. A one-off test against Ireland at Lord’s begins just ten days after the final, on July 24. Then Australia are welcomed to Edgbaston to herald the second half of this enthralling summer of cricket. [bc_video video_id=”6059426321001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Theresa May welcomes the England cricket team to No10 Downing Street after historic win “]
15 Jul 19
The Sun
THE WIVES and girlfriends of England’s cricket stars revelled in Sunday’s magnificent World Cup win with a series of heartfelt Instagram posts. Those players accompanied by their loved ones at Lord’s made sure to thank them for playing their part in the stunning victory. Elle and Jason Roy enjoy the moment with baby Everly A win sealed with a kiss Eoin Morgan, Ben Stokes, Jason Roy, Joe Root and more were pictured embracing their partners on the pitch. And the Wags paid tribute to their beloveds’ amazing achievements via social media. Having lost the toss, England were made to field first and restricted New Zealand to 241. After equalling the Black Caps’ score in dramatic circumstances, the hosts held their nerve in the super over to win courtesy of their boundaries total. Tara Morgan, wife of captain Eoin, wrote: “Could not possibly be prouder!! “It has been four long years, what a finish!!” Fashion marketer Tara with hubbie Eoin and the trophy Mrs Morgan joked of emotional breakdowns after the win For opening bastman Roy, the chance to share the moment on the Lord’s turf with young daughter Everly was a special one. Before the tournament, he told Sun Sport of his horror at finding the baby girl “lifeless” in bed and the through-the-night hospital trip that ensued when she was struck by a stomach infection. The opener cuddles his daughter at Lord’s Roy takes a good look at the trophy with his wife and baby The ICC selected Roy for their Team of the Tournament Clare Stokes, partner of man of the match Ben, wrote online: “Bursting with pride! What a day!!! “I have no more words!!” Among the most heartfelt moments was the Stokes’ embrace after his role in the super over. And Clare has posted a number of pictures of the Wags squad, captioning one “girl power!” after the semi-final beating of Australia. Ben proud as punch with Clare after receiving his medal The 28-year-old celebrates with kids Layton and Libby Clare basks in the nation’s joy Hugging in the pavilion The couple pose for a selfie on the pitch View this post on Instagram Girl Power! ✌🏼 A post shared by Clare (@clarey11) on Jul 11, 2019 at 1:42pm PDT England were favourites going into the tournament but the pressure of hosting it sprouted on a number of times. Group stage defeats to Pakistan, Australia and Sri Lanka crystallised fans’ fears it would all go wrong at their big moment. But two stirring performances versus India and New Zealand in the groups sent them to the final-four, where they demolished the Aussies before Sunday’s epic showdown. Sarah Wood, wife of fast bowler Mark, added on Instagram: “I couldn’t be prouder.” Sarah celebrating with Mark and his winners’ medal The Woods pose with the trophy Jos Buttler posing with wife Louise and daughter Georgia [article-rail-section title=”Most Read Cricket News” posts_category=”334″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”popular” /] Summing up the nation’s mood on Monday was Joe Root’s wife, Carrie. She posted a photo of her lunchtime coffee with the caption: “Now what?!” Joe and Carrie Root at Lord’s as the sun sets The star batsman embraces his wife Chris Woakes shares the moment with wife Amie As well as a World Cup trophy, the couple also have a daughter, Laila In fact, England now have the small matter of the Ashes. A one-off test against Ireland at Lord’s begins just ten days after the final, on July 24. Then Australia are welcomed to Edgbaston to herald the second half of this enthralling summer of cricket. [bc_video video_id=”6059426321001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Theresa May welcomes the England cricket team to No10 Downing Street after historic win “]
15 Jul 19
Boulder Daily Camera
The following data is supplied by Colorado Weekly Homebuyers List Inc., 303-744-2020. The names and addresses of real estate buyers are available on gummed labels that include phone numbers. BOULDER AREA HOME SALES Listed are the buyer, the property address, the seller and the amount. Boulder Michelle Dotter — 4600 17th St., Unit 200, Darcie C. Carr, $189,500. Daniel Connors — 4815 White Rock Circle, Apt. D, Rising Trout Realty Group, $290,900. Daniel Connors — 4815 White Rock Circle, Apt. F, Meier Mount Properties LLC, $299,200. Richard and Imelda Smith — 33 S. Boulder Circle, Apt. 108, Wanda Kaan, $305,000. Elizabeth and John Boese — 1830 22nd St., Apt. 14, Daniel H. Doherty, $312,000. Jordan Mungin — 3250 Oneal Circle, Apt. J35, Maria Gehne, $319,000. Tenzin Passang — 5420 Arapahoe Ave. Ste, Fox LLC, $320,000. Benjamin Setterquist — 7442 Singing Hills Drive, Liam McClintock, $336,000. Katherine Bywater — 5934 Gunbarrel Ave., Apt. F, Anne E. Somes, $395,600. Katie and Mark Ewig — 3850 Paseo Del Prado, Apt. 17, Vicki Meadows, $420,000. Susan Dyer — 4470 Driftwood Place, Keith E. Baker, $445,000. David Janis — 2278 Nicholl St. E., Lowell Dennis Antener, $450,000. Ahmed Wahedi — 500 Mohawk Drive, Apt. 203, Sandra Gaitonde, $465,000. Michael Kwolek — 3301 Arapahoe Ave., Unit 223, Cityview Peloton 390 LP, $489,900. Chih Hsiao — 4475 Aberdeen Court, Donna J. Darland, $531,000. Joseph and Maria Cousins — 7426 Clubhouse Road, Michael E. Kopper, $532,500. Christopher Vonderhaar — 458 Nightshade Drive, Shawn and Denise Smith, $539,000. Imtiaz Rangwala — 3131 Redstone Lane, Roger F. Thompson, $540,000. Lisa Fortuna — 4230 Corriente Place, Mary A. Hassler, $615,000. Katherine and Jonathan Huckabee — 4310 Pali Way, Joseph and Bonit Vininski, $672,500. Ian and Amber Morris — 5553 Baca Circle, F. and Carolynne Muldoon, $740,000. David and Cecile Carlson — 380 S. 36th St., Peter and Virginia Stringi, $770,000. Nicholas and Allison Lasure — 864 Laurel Ave., Thorne Living Trust, $777,000. Patricia Lehman — 275 Pearl St., Apt. 13, Kathleen Clisham Landrum, $785,000. Philip Vanderbilt — 7172 Olde Stage Road, Joseph and Ba Passalacqua, $859,000. Elizabeth Bowesspiegel — 5697 Pennsylvania Place, Kevin and Gail Trenberth, $950,000. Riley and Courtney End — 3330 Everett Drive, Ravi and Stacey Dykema, $950,000. Mirella Shannon — 3125 Bluff St., Spark Boulder 24 LLC, $971,100. Rosalind Buick — 1061 Grant Place, 1061 Grant Place LLC, $1,125,000. Alexis Fasseas — 2944 10th St., Joseph M. Demmler, $1,161,200. Kenneth and Terri Wolf — 4399 Lariat Way, Andrew and Kami White, $1,220,000. Ryan and Yvonne Bennett — 1250 Albion Road, Jeffrey W. Zadow, $1,950,000. Corey and Suzanne Weiss — 3010 Washington St., Eric Lyon, $2,250,000. Gregory and Dana Jones — 3065 17th St., Jason and Casey Hebb, $2,373,000. Broomfield Adiel and Laura Brasov — 3350 Boulder Circle, Unit 202, Ronnie and Judith Blackwelder, $60,000. Ronnie and Judith Blackwelder — 14300 Waterside Lane, Unit L4, Laura and Adiel Brasov, $60,000. Anna Gregory — 10 Amesbury St., Daniel Flanagan, $270,000. Joel Rashbaum — 38 Douglas Drive S., Robert J. Floyd, $330,000. Tiffany Pinkley — 1980 Elmwood St., Leslie M. Prevish, $330,000. Matthew and Whitney Bergman — 13900 Lake Song Lane, Unit U2, Shiela Koppenheffer, $330,000. Upile and Jessica Khaya — 13584 Decatur Court, Jeffrey Waterman, $373,000. Erin Szemak — 395 Jade St., Susan and Barbara Patton, $408,000. Tyson Gutherless — 13349 Pamorama View Lane, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $415,300. Nathan Holloway — 13346 Wildflower St., Richard and Renee Holloway, $420,000. Noah Learner — 4253 Hawthorne Drive, Garret and Malena Nicodemus, $425,000. Steven and Janice Benkoske — 16461 Aliante Drive, Richard J. Hoffer, $430,000. Cheryl Gray — 4815 Raven Run, Igor Gosh, $435,000. Michael and Bruce Baker — 12587 Dale Court, Bryan and Sara Lauer, $440,000. Nathan and Vail Nazzaro — 17452 Olive St., Taylor Morrison Colo. Inc., $442,100. Brian Young — 4960 Yates Court, Zheng Wang, $450,000. Breanna Carroll — 17464 Olive St., Taylor Morrison Colo. Inc., $456,600. Taryn Talley — 13339 Pamorama View Lane, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $459,300. Phillip and Pamela Gonzalez — 3285 W. 11th Ave. Court, Robert V. Erichson, $470,000. Dennis and Jennifer Stjohn — 12631 James Circle, Ngan Thi Le, $474,000. Mosh and Annabelle Manresa — 306 Agate St., Edward and Shannon Talbot, $490,000. Mary and Zachary Evenhouse — 3558 W. 135th Ave., Mark and Beverly Shamley, $490,000. Jill Sutak — 17057 Navajo St., Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $497,000. Christen Selter — 13048 Sandstone Drive, Taylor Morrison Colo. Inc., $511,900. David Dufour — 13329 Pamorama View Lane, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $513,900. Dawn Petrus — 4972 Democrat Drive, Gerald B. Allen Jane N. Li, $515,000. Tenzin Jamyang — 17056 Navajo St., Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $520,000. Nathan and Lynde Haasis — 14133 Fairwind Lane, William and Linda Lane, $532,500. Brandon Sartor — 13359 Pamorama View Lane, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $538,800. Cory and Cassandra Brown — 17078 Osage St., Meritage Homes Coloraod Inc., $550,000. Alfred and Regina Tate — 2037 Vallejo Loop, Wonderland Quail Creek LLC, $557,700. Yolanda Youts — 14272 Piney River Road, Ronald S. Drabman Living Trus, $615,000. Jaccie Martinson — 16040 Atlantic Peak Way, Weekley Homes LLC, $628,000. Justin and Anna Ray — 15915 Vermillion Way, Rex and Constance Renfrew, $638,900. Mary Wrend — 16045 Atlantic Peak Way, Weekley Homes LLC, $645,200. Michael and Rebecca Dews — 13348 King Lake Trail, Thibodeau Revocable Trust, $715,900. Kimberly Dooley — 1229 W. 171st Place, Adam C. Torrez, $748,000. Lars and Kate Grimsrud — 2610 Creekside Court, Scott and Jennifer Nusz, $750,000. Shad Shepston — 3551 Mount Powell Drive, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $868,300. John and Judy Huff — 15678 Bison Run, Toll Co. II LP, $893,100. Ashley and Alexander Olsen — 16185 Bushnell Peak Drive, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $935,400. Arthur and Melinda Toensmeier — 15636 Deer Mountain Circle, Toll Co. II LP, $971,900. Ryan and Erin Polen — 3711 Mount Powell Drive, Epic Homes Anthem Ll, $1,117,400. R and Amanda Lewis — 16401 Graham Peak Way, Epic Homes Anthem Ll, $1,328,800. Erie Woor Pardo — 1204 County Road 7, James S. Waite, $100,000. Greg and Cindy Stackhouse — 2429 Shortridge Place, Jalpesh Patadia, $252,000. Charles Taylor — 1450 Blue Sky Way, Unit 12-30, Mark and Tiffany McCaughtry, $302,500. Susan Elsberry — 890 Audubon Peak Drive, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $432,900. Nathaniel and Laura Rapsey — 2570 Wisteria Drive, Todd and Katelin Bjerkaas, $440,000. Donald and Amanda Bird — 562 Green Mountain Drive, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $454,100. Laura and Keith McMorran — 962 Twin Sister Circle, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $464,000. Jill Hipes — 1042 Pinecliff Drive, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $480,400. Michael and Carole Mancini — 625 Brennan Circle, Bc Brennan LLC, $484,200. Spencer and Emily Roberts — 515 Gallegos Circle, Susan Ann Smietanski, $488,000. John and Vera Newman — 1181 Homestead Road, William Lyon Homes Inc., $517,000. Gregory and Jessica Witherow — 141 Northrup Drive, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $530,400. Eric and Julie Gleason — 90 Solstice Way, Debra and Edward Goodman, $535,000. Kevin and Eva Rich — 766 Cabot Drive, Standard Pacific Colo. Inc., $537,300. Dominic and Christina Carlill — 615 Gold Hill Drive, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $549,900. Allen and Kara Knott — 963 Pinecliff Drive, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $551,200. Christopher and Nicole Shipman — 1396 Jackson Court, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $558,000. Christopher and Kathleen Garcia — 905 Lawson Place, Anita and Donald Dragoo, $576,000. Patrick and Hannah Finley — 77 Sun Up Circle, Lee and Alicia Graves, $582,800. Joseph and Elizabeth Ferrone — 655 Dakota Court, Richard Franks, $635,000. Celine and John Planow — 765 Grenville Circle, Tara L. Murphy, $635,000. David and Allison Cowles — 932 Sandstone Circle, Lennar Colo. LLC, $637,100. Nathan and Lauren Lease — 409 Polaris Circle, Louise and Andrew Cowan, $677,000. Paul and Sandra Williams — 810 Grenville Circle, Standard Pacific Colo. Inc., $697,400. Richard and Denise Boselli — 73 Sunshine Circle, Rodrigo V. Robes, $765,000. Anjali Sheth — 2172 Fountain Circle, Toll Co. LP, $845,200. Earl and Jennifer Manchester — 12110 Jasper Road, Kurt and Rita Ellis, $883,000. Austin and Kathryn Hill — 2157 Fountain Circle, Toll Co. LP, $903,700. Lafayette Lucila Gomez — 409 Autrey Ave., Phillip R. Tharp, $320,000. Taylor Strasburger — 133 Mesa Circle, Corey M. Samot, $429,000. Robert Wong — 2365 Redwood Ave., Ivan Drury, $460,000. Teresa and David Jordan — 532 Casper Drive, Jennifer Nickal, $465,000. Russell White — 527 Mills St., Christine B. Johnsen, $467,000. Michael Davidson — 903 Vetch Circle, Eric W. Carpenter, $475,000. Janice Devries — 507 E. Cleveland St., Sarah and Kenneth Jensen, $479,000. Olivia and Ronald Curtis — 275 N. Cherrywood Drive, Greg and Janet Fanger, $495,000. Sherri Tennant — 908 Clover Circle, Katherine and Chad Willis, $509,000. Bryan Hall — 1522 Haystack Way, Kevin and Sarah Kornegay, $529,900. Lucia Messina — 180 Mercator Ave., Mary Ann Frazin, $545,000. David and Rebekah Gura — 604 Mills St., Andrew Pillari, $560,000. Robert Carney — 325 Marmot Point, Nicolas and Katheri Ferrington, $625,000. Melissa and Bryan McGowan — 608 Trails At Coal Creek Drive, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $725,000. Sara and Matthew Barber — 2891 Cascade Creek Drive, Gabriel and Michelle Gullia, $790,000. Elliot and Thomas Good — 4248 N. 109th St., Amador Jaso, $815,000. Nasim Zabihi — 727 Stagecoach Drive, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $1,064,400. Bradley and Colleen Elliott — 4440 N. 109th St., David and Shinob Doucette, $1,100,000. Lucas and Molly Thelosen — 718 Skywalker Point, Andrew and Kelly Judd, $1,250,000. Longmont Heather Brooks — 2160 Meadow Court, Christy and Maurine Estes, $255,000. Patricia Huybrechts — 804 Summer Hawk Drive, Unit 11103, Becky and Ronald Selby, $256,900. Susan Dillon — 804 Summer Hawk Drive, Unit 5208, Patricia E. Huybrechts, $270,000. Ting Jia — 930 Button Rock Drive, Unit Q97, Samuel J. Schreiber, $293,000. David Pacheco — 1419 Red Mountain Drive, Unit 99, Amanda Boughey, $297,500. Karin Cassidy — 1419 Red Mountain Drive, Unit 25, Kenneth R. Anderson, $299,000. Stephen Schernecke — 10665 Forester Place, Nicole and Joshua Casey, $300,000. Scott Norman — 51 Powder Horn Place, Thomas Treat, $317,500. Jessica and Joshua Laikeman — 1337 Dogwood Lane, John and Valeria Moore, $319,900. Darrel Sonday — 818 S. Terry St., Apt. 94, Kathleen Harterpoiry, $323,900. Shane Meehan — 10699 Durango Place, Nicole L. Perez, $330,000. Jade Zuspan — 801 Confidence Drive, Unit 21, Dana J. Silkensen, $345,000. Alanna Moore — 3674 Oakwood Drive, Barbara and Spencer Keller, $350,000. Geoffrey Tyre — 1252 Fall River Circle, Edward D. Tapia, $356,700. Debra Mastic — 2301 N. Shore Drive, Elsayed Saad Revocable Trust, $371,000. Michael Beard — 722 Kimbark St., Paul Williams, $385,000. Alisa Jeffery — 970 Wolf Creek Drive, Karen L. Teter, $385,000. David Spielman — 1421 Sunset St., Aaron and Jenna Corder, $392,500. Anil Mylevahanan — 1212 Lark St., Nina Barrett, $424,000. Dennis and Kim Vanderslice — 812 Elliott St., Claudia A. Druss, $428,000. David and Amanda Beard — 1501 Bellwood Drive, Mathias and Luann Heltemes, $430,000. Jason Rieg — 2067 River Walk Lane, James and Cassandra Moore, $430,000. Nina Barrett — 11 Marshall Place, Ags Invest LLC, $433,100. Nathan Hix — 2032 Red Cloud Road, Asheesh and Payal Ahuja, $436,000. Stephanie Bonjack — 1424 Sorrel Court, Benjamin and Joy Bishop, $450,000. Edouard Fontenot — 522 Peregrine Circle, David L. Hansen, $454,500. Jameson and Diedre Ribbens — 1453 Serenity Circle, Alyson Canepa, $455,000. Connie Reinhardt — 141 E. Longs Peak Ave., Gutekunst Revocable Tru, $460,000. Adam and Jennifer McMurtrey — 1920 Third Ave., Joseph M. Coyle, $480,000. Steven and Georgina Burrows — 135 Sugar Beet Circle, Meritage Homes Colo. Inc., $492,900. Melissa Bailey — 1601 Heirloom Way, William Fligg, $495,000. Robert and Elaine Waterman — 1504 Bluefield Ave., Joseph M. Lien, $495,000. Richard and Brittany Gratton — 718 Clarendon Drive, Ronald and Sandra Fracchia, $500,000. Ryan Clizer — 1037 Woodgate Court, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $504,800. Brian and Daisha McDermott — 260 Western Sky Circle, Richmond Am Homes Colo. Inc., $549,300. Richard Feilden — 1635 Alpine St., John Malcolm Felsing, $550,000. Jason and Brandi Schott — 1258 S. Oak Court, Flatirons Homes Inc., $550,000. John and Jean Ellison — 2705 Villanova Court, William Claire Fairchild, $565,000. Larry and Paulette McGimsey — 2345 Flagstaff Drive, Richfield Homes LLC, $622,400. Jessica Cameron — 2233 Barn Swallow Drive, Shelley Sheppeck, $625,000. Byoungjoo Jung — 2229 Lombardy St., KB home Colo. Inc., $626,900. Ian Cofrin — 825 Panorama Circle, Robert and Dongmei Klein, $700,000. Kurt and Jennifer Lorhammer — 1016 Redbud Circle, Donald and Emily Douglas, $710,000. Robert Murphy — 3920 Nelson Road, Robert Titley, $1,255,000. Louisville Mark and Olga Kightlinger — 150 Pheasant Run, John C. Matos, $339,300. Pewaubek and Karina Reid — 225 W. Sycamore Lane, Tyler and Kelsey Bennett, $556,000. Rajesh Joshi — 1071 Leonard Lane, Boulder Creek Delo LLC, $599,000. Jocelyn Herod — 940 Elm St., No. 3, Gordon Blair Mcbride, $649,200. Kalle and Margaret Anderson — 401 West St., Eileen Patrick, $650,000. Jennie and Kevin Geiger — 182 Cherrywood Lane, Charles and Marilee Cook, $670,000. Thomas and Mary Deany — 1090 Griffith St., Wkj Enterprises LLC, $742,000. Nederland Mariah Colton — 750 Lazy Z. Road, Melissa J. Dunning, $465,000. Superior Charles and Noelle Russ — 1242 S. Mesa Court, Michael and Lisa Bondurant, $620,000. Junghee Kang — 3662 Castle Peak Ave., Brian and Pam Senjem, $628,000. Bettina Buob — 3170 E. Yarrow Circle, Michael and Kelli Sanchez, $634,000. May and Sean Rosekrans — 1840 Vernon Lane, Catherine and Dougla Denewiler, $925,000.
15 Jul 19
loveartnotpeople

Objetivos: El arte contemporáneo es heredero del modo en el que el arte modernista fue puesto en tensión por aquellos aportes que llamaron la atención sobre los límites de los ideales de autonomía planteados por los artistas desde el siglo XIX. Sin embargo, esta ruptura con el modernismo no es tan absoluta como parece a […]

15 Jul 19
IndieWire
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Big Little Lies” Season 2, Episode 6, “The Bad Mother.”] So, it all comes down to… this? A courtroom inquisition with Nicole Kidman’s abused wife acting as her own attorney against Meryl Streep’s aggrieved, possibly vengeful grandma; one parent questioning the other for the title of “The Good Mother,” aka the legal guardianship of two young boys? Even if we don’t bring in the behind-the-scenes knowledge of how this season came about, Episode 6, “The Bad Mother,” feels like David E. Kelley throwing his hands up in the air and screaming, “Fuck it! Let’s just make it about the law!” After all, Kelley, a former attorney, has been writing about lawyers and courtrooms and legalese for more than three decades. The “L.A. Law,” “Ally McBeal,” “Boston Legal,” “Harry’s Law,” and “Goliath” creator has made it his “Practice” to place as many dramatic confrontations as possible between a pacing attorney and a cowering witness. And yet it feels so very strange to realize “Big Little Lies,” of all shows, will reach its Season 2 climax with Celeste using her oft-touted but rarely seen legal prowess to outwit, overpower, and shame her mother-in-law, Mary Louise. On the one hand, Kelley is giving the people what they want: an overtly melodramatic throwdown between the series’ two most notable performers. Who cares that it doesn’t fit the show? Who cares that it’s totally unnecessary? Who cares that the judge was about to grant custody to Celeste? That mama wants a fight, and we want it, too! But… sigh. It’s just hard to take any satisfaction in how the series’ searches for conflict anymore. Well before Celeste extended the story like a bad reality TV show, making us wait one more episode to hear the long-awaited verdict, Kelley’s been struggling to find a central, unifying problem as compelling as last season. To compensate, all the characters are either spinning their wheels (like Bonnie, who’s been haunted and wanting to confess since Episode 1) or acting against the core of who they are (like Ed, whose very public lunch date with Tori, played by Sarah Sokolovic, is impossible to believe — no matter how many times he claims to be a changed man, Adam Scott and his panicked cringes are the two things that won’t lie to us!). Without a single grounding force, “Big Little Lies” has gone totally off the rails, running out of story at the same time its audience has run out of patience. What was an amiable, even enlivening experience through three episodes showed its true colors in a confounding, problematic fourth entry and only fell further apart from there. Now, as we prepare for the finale, what answers are worth sticking around for? Adam Scott in “Big Little Lies” Will Bonnie kill her mom? Perhaps the bigger question is if Bonnie will stop lying to us before she stops lying in general. There have been so many scenes where Bonnie imagines doing something before we cut back to reality, where she’s only thinking about it. In this episode alone, she imagined confessing to killing Perry during an interrogation. Then she imagined killing her mother with a pillow. Then she imagined standing up in court and confessing. All of these are fake-outs which undermine what she actually does — I was expecting her long, angry tirade against her mother to suddenly stop and show Bonnie waking up from a nap — but they’re also redundant. We already know Bonnie wants to confess. We already know Bonnie is thinking about killing her mom. We already know Bonnie wants to confess — yes, I said this twice, because they showed it twice in the episode even though she’s been thinking about it all season! Come on!! Will Ed and Madeline stay together? This was, prior to “The Bad Mother,” my favorite storyline in Season 2. Adam Scott has been very, very good throughout, making Ed’s wounded “good guy” living on the edge of breaking, well, less good pretty fun to watch — mainly when he flips out on Nathan (James Tupper). But now we’re supposed to believe he’d entertain the idea of having an affair with Tori, just because it would… feel good? That’s not Ed’s way, and it feels like the show is just keeping her around so that when Ed finds out about Perry’s death, there’s an imminent threat. Maybe he’ll run to her bed when he finds out he’s been lied to again, but if he does, is that really in character? I don’t buy it. He’s too rational to jump to that extreme after spending all this time dwelling on it. Will Jane… do… something? Be OK? I don’t know what we’re supposed to hope for with Jane. There’s no reason to invest in her relationship with Corey (Douglas Smith), other than hoping that she can find love and happiness in romance again, but there’s no reason it has to be him. Jane seems like she’s processing things pretty well, overall. I think she’ll be fine no matter what. Forgetting about Mama Wright vs. Grandma Wright, which is, again, just there for the spectacle of Kidman vs. Streep, that leaves Renata (Laura Dern). Despite most of Renata’s drama circulating around her stunningly douchey hubby, the way Dern channels her rage into a propulsive, inventive, and positively feral spew of curse words is nothing short of “Veep”-esque. For that, I’m invested in Renata’s outcome. Though I’m worried there won’t be much of one, I do hope for a finale miracle and some sort of poetic resolution for Renata. But… sigh. That seems unlikely. The Season 2 lies are simultaneously too big and too little. So fuck it. Bring on the court battle. Grade: C “Big Little Lies” will air its Season 2 finale Sunday, July 21 at 9 p.m. ET on HBO.
14 Jul 19
News Directory

I am Carianne M. Leahy, representative, and Judith A. Kortabani, estate, with Andrew J. Shufelt III, and Trisha L. Shufelt, 124 Mill Street, $ 210,000. Carol A. Sarage to Kyle C. Devlin, 198 Beekman Drive, $ 145,000. Charles A. Calabrese with Neena T. Qasba, St. Anvil 205, $ 527,900. Christen M. Kelley, Christen M. Roberts […]

14 Jul 19
Reading in Pajamas

✿ROMANCE NEW RELEASES 07/14-07/20/19✿ ✦The Wedding Party by Jasmine Guillory (Contemporary Romance) (Releasing 07/16/19) ➢ Kindle $11.99 https://amzn.to/2DEAOZW ✦Riding the Edge (The Wild Riders Series) by Jaci Burton (Contemporary Romance) (Releasing 07/16/19) ➢ Kindle $3.99 https://amzn.to/2Y0ZGqV ✦Making Up by Helena Hunting (Contemporary Romance) (Releasing 07/16/19) ➢ Kindle $4.99 https://amzn.to/2jSvaxk ‪✦Love, Loyalty & Mayhem: A Motorcycle […]

14 Jul 19
d2tv

Hello sundogs. Close the drapes. We have TV to watch. Sunday July 14 PBS fan? Grantchester is back from 9-11pm ET. Bumph: “Sidney is swept up in the civil rights movement after a pastor and his daughter arrive in Cambridge, and a murder sees racial tensions spike; Sidney struggles to remember a murdered woman’s final […]

14 Jul 19
Swimming World News

Mike Higgs, Britain Olympic coach, mentor to Olympic medallist, World short-course and Commonwealth Sarah Hardcastle, Worlds medallist and Commonwealth champion Jackie Willmott, multiple world short-course champion and Commonwealth champion Mark Foster and generations of swimmers for the best part of half a century, has passed away. He was 73 and had been fighting a battle […]

13 Jul 19
The Sun
FOLLOWING Stacey Solomon’s no-holds-barred post-birth Insta pic after the recent arrival of son Rex, we asked three women to share theirs – and the stories behind them. Jaimie, Holly and Natasha’s first moments with their beautiful babies was captured and shared for the world to see. ‘I didn’t care about how I looked – I was in pure survival mode’ Jaimie Sarah Crooks, 32, is a female executive coach from London. She and fiancé Aaron, 37, a property developer, welcomed son Joshua on October 16, 2018. Jaimie gave birth to her son Joshua in October last year “When I look at this photo I feel grateful that Joshua and I made it out of childbirth alive. After a three-day labour and emergency caesarean I was exhausted and out of it on meds, but it authentically captures my experience and I now share it to help women gain peace around birth. “I got pregnant within seven months of meeting Aaron in May 2017. We’d talked about having kids and agreed we wanted them, but never dreamed it would happen so quickly. “We were overjoyed, but my pregnancy wasn’t easy. I suffered morning sickness all day every day, and at seven months developed a pyogenic granuloma on my forehead – a benign vascular lesion caused by hormonal changes, which left me self-conscious about my appearance. “I believed that while my pregnancy had been difficult, the birth would be better. I had my heart set on the birthing pool at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital – but it wasn’t to be. Jaimie’s fiance Aaron was there to hold her hand during the birth “During the last four weeks of pregnancy, my baby’s movement slowed and at 40 weeks, after my second reduced movement monitoring, the midwives wanted to induce me. “My birthing centre dreams were crushed and I was frightened. I had depression as a teen and anxiety in my early 20s, and in that moment the anxiety returned. “I knew I had to do what was best for my baby, so the next morning I was induced, and nearly 48 hours after the induction began my waters broke. I was exhausted and needed pain relief to get through it – initially I had gas and air, then an epidural. “Labour went on for another 23 hours and the midwives first tried to get Joshua out naturally, then with ventouse and finally forceps. But he became stuck and his heart rate dropped. Jaimie suffered terrible morning sickness throughout her pregnancy “I was rushed to theatre, where I panicked after hearing a crack as the team gave the forceps one more try. I thought they’d crushed my baby’s skull and was terrified one or both of us would die. “After an emergency C-section, the doctors said Joshua was fine and asked if I wanted to hold him, but I was too upset to even look at him. “I was annoyed with my baby for wrecking my body – something I felt guilty for. I asked the anaesthetist if it was normal to not want to hold your newborn after a traumatic birth and she reassured me that it was, but urged me to seek help if the feeling continued. Thankfully, it didn’t. “Once I was stitched, up Aaron placed Joshua on my chest and I felt a rush of love, but I was dazed and in incredible pain. Gorgeous Joshua poses for a photo “I felt violated, and in that photo every emotion – love, pain, fear, intrusion, worry – is etched on my face. “For weeks after, I didn’t care how I looked in front of a camera. I was in pure survival mode, concerned with whether I could walk or breastfeed. “For the first three months I had postnatal depression, which I believe was triggered by the difficult birth. Because of my mental health history, the hospital had allocated a perinatal psychiatric nurse, who I’d seen twice in pregnancy and then saw once a week for two months after Joshua’s birth. “Six hours after he was born, I posted a happy family pic on Insta and five days later I posted about mourning the loss of the plan of his arrival. Jaimie hopes that she can inspire pregnant women with her story “Three months later I shared the raw, honest first birth photo, opening up about how my labour had gone differently to what I’d planned, how that was OK and how it’s also OK if you’re suffering afterwards and need help. “I hope women who’ve had a traumatic birth will see my journey and realise it’s possible to recover and that one day, they will feel better, too.” ‘Applying make-up kept me calm before my C-section’ Holly Stevens, 35, is a beauty PR director and lives in London with her sports marketing partner Tom Fogg, 40. Their son Freddy was born on September 10, 2018. Holly Stevens and her partner Tom welcomes their son Freddy in September last year “My first photograph with Freddy represents the reality of my birth: completely flawless. I had a planned C-section and it felt totally calm and beautiful, largely helped by the surgeon who played relaxing classical music throughout. “Tom and I had only been together for three months when we conceived. The pregnancy came out of the blue and I was instantly terrified of giving birth. “I’d freaked out watching an Instagram birthing video and heard horror stories from my sister Louise, 38, who’d had pre-eclampsia and endured a terrible labour followed by an emergency Caesarean, for which she’d not been properly anaesthetised. “In the hope of a smooth birth, I booked privately for an elective C-section. It was costly, but as I’m self- employed, it was a huge advantage to know exactly when Freddy would arrive. Holly was terrified about giving birth but says her experience was flawless “I’m a real planner and because I felt so out of control during pregnancy, it helped me claw back some agency. “Looking my best during the birth was another thing I could control. After I fell pregnant, my best friend Alex, 34, said: ‘You can’t look s**t in your first baby picture.’ “Neither of us had been pregnant before, but we follow lots of celebrities on Instagram, including Abbey Clancy who looked stunning after giving birth. It really inspired me to do the same. “I knew that my first photograph with Freddy would go on Instagram and Facebook and be seen by friends, family and people I work with – clients, journalists and influencers – so I wanted to look as good as possible. The birth of Freddy was a planned C-section “Working in beauty PR, I’ve got a hairdresser client, so fortunately I rarely have to wash my own hair. I also keep my nails looking good with Shellac and get my eyebrows tattooed regularly. “People might think I’m being vain, but it’s crucial in my line of business that I’m always immaculately presented – and that includes in photographs of me with my newborn. “Two days before going to hospital I had my hair blow-dried in a salon and got my lashes extended and tinted so they’d look great in all the photos of me looking down at my new baby. “I’d had my eyebrows tattooed just before I got pregnant, so luckily they were still visible, too. Holly made sure she had her eyebrows and nails done before she gave birth “Just before I was due to have the C-section, I suddenly felt scared about the surgery so I distracted myself by applying make-up. Then I’d cry because of the nerves and would have to start over again! “As soon as I went into theatre, however, everything calmed down and I felt relaxed. I didn’t even realise they’d started operating until I felt a weird tug and Freddy was pulled out and held above the screen. “When my sister took the first photo of us together at 9.15am, I was on cloud nine, back in my hospital room drinking tea, munching on Hobnobs and feeling hopelessly in love with our baby son. “At the time, I’d taken lots of painkillers and was so excited that I don’t actually remember the photograph being taken! But I’m glad that it was, and that it’s there to remind us of the special moment. Holly works in PR and says its vital for her to always look immaculate “Unlike Stacey Solomon, I’d never dream of posting a photograph of myself covered in blood while cradling my newborn, because I wouldn’t want to remember the first moment with my baby as being all gungey. “It’s important for your own self-esteem to feel as good as you can. A few days after I was discharged with Freddy, I had a professional blow-dry at home to feel less like a sleep-deprived, ragged new mum. “It feels nice to look back at that first picture with Freddy knowing I felt my best at the very best time of my life.” ‘I was just so grateful my son was alive’ Natasha Bray, 32, is a rapid transformation therapy coach and psychology expert and lives in Bridgend. Her son Jenson, two, was born on October 5, 2016. Natasha’s son Jenson was born in October 2016 “When Jenson was placed on to my chest after a horrific 14-hour labour, I was in a daze. My body had tried to push the baby out before my cervix was fully dilated, and by the time I was ready the contractions had stopped so I delivered him without them. “I was severely torn internally and externally and was later diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse, a serious but common complication that comes from birth when one or more of the organs in the pelvis slip down from their normal position and bulge into the vagina. “At the time of this photograph, I had no idea of the severity of my injuries. I just remember thinking how beautiful my boy was and how lucky I was to finally have him after over a year of fearing I was infertile. “After being abused as a child, it was the first moment in my life when I had experienced unconditional love. Natasha says her birthing experience was traumatic “I’d become addicted to food when I was young, which was an emotional escape from the pain of childhood trauma. Then at 16, after ballooning to a size 16, I joined a gym but became addicted to working out. “Within three years, I had dropped to a size 6. I’d always dreamed of being married with children by 30, but when I came off the Pill in my late 20s I couldn’t get pregnant with my then boyfriend. “I thought I’d ruined my chances of being a mum because I’d treated my body so badly – it was a huge wake-up call. At 28 I transformed my diet. “I started taking natural supplements and eating more food and within 18 months, when I was a healthy size 10 and in a new relationship, I fell pregnant unexpectedly. Natasha’s labour lasted 14 hours and she severely damaged her body pushing her baby out “I’d not been with Marc, 33, long but I was over the moon, because I desperately wanted to be a mum. “The birth was traumatic. During labour I was in immeasurable pain but feared the worst for my unborn son, so when he arrived I was just grateful he was alive. “Because of the pelvic organ prolapse – a lifelong injury – I was told I could never exercise again. The news floored me, and although my relationship with fitness had become a lot healthier before pregnancy, I still used exercise as a distraction to blot out traumatic memories from my past. “Imagining a life without it was petrifying, and when Jenson was 10 months old I split up from his dad and was signed off work with stress and postnatal depression, which I believe was linked to the birth trauma and medical issues that followed. Natasha was told that she would not be able to exercise again “For a while I couldn’t look at Jenson’s birth photo without thinking about what I’d lost: my health, the family unit, myself. Now, it symbolises the start of my journey towards healing my past. “I’ve been told I can have surgery to repair the pelvic prolapse, but the op has a 30% failure rate and will stop me from having more kids, so it’s a decision I’m not ready to make at my age. “I’m having physiotherapy to strengthen my pelvic floor, but it’s a long journey ahead. “Without exercise I’ve been forced to deal with stress and emotional trauma in different ways, including launching my own business and having therapy sessions, which are a mix of CBT hypnosis and neuro-linguistic programming. She says having a baby has put everything into perspective “I’m also working with a postnatal personal trainer to build strength through light, low-impact exercise. “Having a baby has put everything into perspective and I’ve got one person to thank for teaching me so much: my little Jenson. He really is my saviour.” [bc_video video_id=”6048331816001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Joe Swash says Stacey Solomon was a warrior during labour but he nearly had to CATCH the baby during childbirth”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk  
13 Jul 19
The Scottish Sun
FOLLOWING Stacey Solomon’s no-holds-barred post-birth Insta pic after the recent arrival of son Rex, we asked three women to share theirs – and the stories behind them. Jaimie, Holly and Natasha’s first moments with their beautiful babies was captured and shared for the world to see. ‘I didn’t care about how I looked – I was in pure survival mode’ Jaimie Sarah Crooks, 32, is a female executive coach from London. She and fiancé Aaron, 37, a property developer, welcomed son Joshua on October 16, 2018. Jaimie gave birth to her son Joshua in October last year “When I look at this photo I feel grateful that Joshua and I made it out of childbirth alive. After a three-day labour and emergency caesarean I was exhausted and out of it on meds, but it authentically captures my experience and I now share it to help women gain peace around birth. “I got pregnant within seven months of meeting Aaron in May 2017. We’d talked about having kids and agreed we wanted them, but never dreamed it would happen so quickly. “We were overjoyed, but my pregnancy wasn’t easy. I suffered morning sickness all day every day, and at seven months developed a pyogenic granuloma on my forehead – a benign vascular lesion caused by hormonal changes, which left me self-conscious about my appearance. “I believed that while my pregnancy had been difficult, the birth would be better. I had my heart set on the birthing pool at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital – but it wasn’t to be. Jaimie’s fiance Aaron was there to hold her hand during the birth “During the last four weeks of pregnancy, my baby’s movement slowed and at 40 weeks, after my second reduced movement monitoring, the midwives wanted to induce me. “My birthing centre dreams were crushed and I was frightened. I had depression as a teen and anxiety in my early 20s, and in that moment the anxiety returned. “I knew I had to do what was best for my baby, so the next morning I was induced, and nearly 48 hours after the induction began my waters broke. I was exhausted and needed pain relief to get through it – initially I had gas and air, then an epidural. “Labour went on for another 23 hours and the midwives first tried to get Joshua out naturally, then with ventouse and finally forceps. But he became stuck and his heart rate dropped. Jaimie suffered terrible morning sickness throughout her pregnancy “I was rushed to theatre, where I panicked after hearing a crack as the team gave the forceps one more try. I thought they’d crushed my baby’s skull and was terrified one or both of us would die. “After an emergency C-section, the doctors said Joshua was fine and asked if I wanted to hold him, but I was too upset to even look at him. “I was annoyed with my baby for wrecking my body – something I felt guilty for. I asked the anaesthetist if it was normal to not want to hold your newborn after a traumatic birth and she reassured me that it was, but urged me to seek help if the feeling continued. Thankfully, it didn’t. “Once I was stitched, up Aaron placed Joshua on my chest and I felt a rush of love, but I was dazed and in incredible pain. Gorgeous Joshua poses for a photo “I felt violated, and in that photo every emotion – love, pain, fear, intrusion, worry – is etched on my face. “For weeks after, I didn’t care how I looked in front of a camera. I was in pure survival mode, concerned with whether I could walk or breastfeed. “For the first three months I had postnatal depression, which I believe was triggered by the difficult birth. Because of my mental health history, the hospital had allocated a perinatal psychiatric nurse, who I’d seen twice in pregnancy and then saw once a week for two months after Joshua’s birth. “Six hours after he was born, I posted a happy family pic on Insta and five days later I posted about mourning the loss of the plan of his arrival. Jaimie hopes that she can inspire pregnant women with her story “Three months later I shared the raw, honest first birth photo, opening up about how my labour had gone differently to what I’d planned, how that was OK and how it’s also OK if you’re suffering afterwards and need help. “I hope women who’ve had a traumatic birth will see my journey and realise it’s possible to recover and that one day, they will feel better, too.” ‘Applying make-up kept me calm before my C-section’ Holly Stevens, 35, is a beauty PR director and lives in London with her sports marketing partner Tom Fogg, 40. Their son Freddy was born on September 10, 2018. Holly Stevens and her partner Tom welcomes their son Freddy in September last year “My first photograph with Freddy represents the reality of my birth: completely flawless. I had a planned C-section and it felt totally calm and beautiful, largely helped by the surgeon who played relaxing classical music throughout. “Tom and I had only been together for three months when we conceived. The pregnancy came out of the blue and I was instantly terrified of giving birth. “I’d freaked out watching an Instagram birthing video and heard horror stories from my sister Louise, 38, who’d had pre-eclampsia and endured a terrible labour followed by an emergency Caesarean, for which she’d not been properly anaesthetised. “In the hope of a smooth birth, I booked privately for an elective C-section. It was costly, but as I’m self- employed, it was a huge advantage to know exactly when Freddy would arrive. Holly was terrified about giving birth but says her experience was flawless “I’m a real planner and because I felt so out of control during pregnancy, it helped me claw back some agency. “Looking my best during the birth was another thing I could control. After I fell pregnant, my best friend Alex, 34, said: ‘You can’t look s**t in your first baby picture.’ “Neither of us had been pregnant before, but we follow lots of celebrities on Instagram, including Abbey Clancy who looked stunning after giving birth. It really inspired me to do the same. “I knew that my first photograph with Freddy would go on Instagram and Facebook and be seen by friends, family and people I work with – clients, journalists and influencers – so I wanted to look as good as possible. The birth of Freddy was a planned C-section “Working in beauty PR, I’ve got a hairdresser client, so fortunately I rarely have to wash my own hair. I also keep my nails looking good with Shellac and get my eyebrows tattooed regularly. “People might think I’m being vain, but it’s crucial in my line of business that I’m always immaculately presented – and that includes in photographs of me with my newborn. “Two days before going to hospital I had my hair blow-dried in a salon and got my lashes extended and tinted so they’d look great in all the photos of me looking down at my new baby. “I’d had my eyebrows tattooed just before I got pregnant, so luckily they were still visible, too. Holly made sure she had her eyebrows and nails done before she gave birth “Just before I was due to have the C-section, I suddenly felt scared about the surgery so I distracted myself by applying make-up. Then I’d cry because of the nerves and would have to start over again! “As soon as I went into theatre, however, everything calmed down and I felt relaxed. I didn’t even realise they’d started operating until I felt a weird tug and Freddy was pulled out and held above the screen. “When my sister took the first photo of us together at 9.15am, I was on cloud nine, back in my hospital room drinking tea, munching on Hobnobs and feeling hopelessly in love with our baby son. “At the time, I’d taken lots of painkillers and was so excited that I don’t actually remember the photograph being taken! But I’m glad that it was, and that it’s there to remind us of the special moment. Holly works in PR and says its vital for her to always look immaculate “Unlike Stacey Solomon, I’d never dream of posting a photograph of myself covered in blood while cradling my newborn, because I wouldn’t want to remember the first moment with my baby as being all gungey. “It’s important for your own self-esteem to feel as good as you can. A few days after I was discharged with Freddy, I had a professional blow-dry at home to feel less like a sleep-deprived, ragged new mum. “It feels nice to look back at that first picture with Freddy knowing I felt my best at the very best time of my life.” ‘I was just so grateful my son was alive’ Natasha Bray, 32, is a rapid transformation therapy coach and psychology expert and lives in Bridgend. Her son Jenson, two, was born on October 5, 2016. Natasha’s son Jenson was born in October 2016 “When Jenson was placed on to my chest after a horrific 14-hour labour, I was in a daze. My body had tried to push the baby out before my cervix was fully dilated, and by the time I was ready the contractions had stopped so I delivered him without them. “I was severely torn internally and externally and was later diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse, a serious but common complication that comes from birth when one or more of the organs in the pelvis slip down from their normal position and bulge into the vagina. “At the time of this photograph, I had no idea of the severity of my injuries. I just remember thinking how beautiful my boy was and how lucky I was to finally have him after over a year of fearing I was infertile. “After being abused as a child, it was the first moment in my life when I had experienced unconditional love. Natasha says her birthing experience was traumatic “I’d become addicted to food when I was young, which was an emotional escape from the pain of childhood trauma. Then at 16, after ballooning to a size 16, I joined a gym but became addicted to working out. “Within three years, I had dropped to a size 6. I’d always dreamed of being married with children by 30, but when I came off the Pill in my late 20s I couldn’t get pregnant with my then boyfriend. “I thought I’d ruined my chances of being a mum because I’d treated my body so badly – it was a huge wake-up call. At 28 I transformed my diet. “I started taking natural supplements and eating more food and within 18 months, when I was a healthy size 10 and in a new relationship, I fell pregnant unexpectedly. Natasha’s labour lasted 14 hours and she severely damaged her body pushing her baby out “I’d not been with Marc, 33, long but I was over the moon, because I desperately wanted to be a mum. “The birth was traumatic. During labour I was in immeasurable pain but feared the worst for my unborn son, so when he arrived I was just grateful he was alive. “Because of the pelvic organ prolapse – a lifelong injury – I was told I could never exercise again. The news floored me, and although my relationship with fitness had become a lot healthier before pregnancy, I still used exercise as a distraction to blot out traumatic memories from my past. “Imagining a life without it was petrifying, and when Jenson was 10 months old I split up from his dad and was signed off work with stress and postnatal depression, which I believe was linked to the birth trauma and medical issues that followed. Natasha was told that she would not be able to exercise again “For a while I couldn’t look at Jenson’s birth photo without thinking about what I’d lost: my health, the family unit, myself. Now, it symbolises the start of my journey towards healing my past. “I’ve been told I can have surgery to repair the pelvic prolapse, but the op has a 30% failure rate and will stop me from having more kids, so it’s a decision I’m not ready to make at my age. “I’m having physiotherapy to strengthen my pelvic floor, but it’s a long journey ahead. “Without exercise I’ve been forced to deal with stress and emotional trauma in different ways, including launching my own business and having therapy sessions, which are a mix of CBT hypnosis and neuro-linguistic programming. She says having a baby has put everything into perspective “I’m also working with a postnatal personal trainer to build strength through light, low-impact exercise. “Having a baby has put everything into perspective and I’ve got one person to thank for teaching me so much: my little Jenson. He really is my saviour.” [bc_video video_id=”6048331816001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Joe Swash says Stacey Solomon was a warrior during labour but he nearly had to CATCH the baby during childbirth”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk  
13 Jul 19
The Irish Sun
FOLLOWING Stacey Solomon’s no-holds-barred post-birth Insta pic after the recent arrival of son Rex, we asked three women to share theirs – and the stories behind them. Jaimie, Holly and Natasha’s first moments with their beautiful babies was captured and shared for the world to see. ‘I didn’t care about how I looked – I was in pure survival mode’ Jaimie Sarah Crooks, 32, is a female executive coach from London. She and fiancé Aaron, 37, a property developer, welcomed son Joshua on October 16, 2018. Jaimie gave birth to her son Joshua in October last year “When I look at this photo I feel grateful that Joshua and I made it out of childbirth alive. After a three-day labour and emergency caesarean I was exhausted and out of it on meds, but it authentically captures my experience and I now share it to help women gain peace around birth. “I got pregnant within seven months of meeting Aaron in May 2017. We’d talked about having kids and agreed we wanted them, but never dreamed it would happen so quickly. “We were overjoyed, but my pregnancy wasn’t easy. I suffered morning sickness all day every day, and at seven months developed a pyogenic granuloma on my forehead – a benign vascular lesion caused by hormonal changes, which left me self-conscious about my appearance. “I believed that while my pregnancy had been difficult, the birth would be better. I had my heart set on the birthing pool at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital – but it wasn’t to be. Jaimie’s fiance Aaron was there to hold her hand during the birth “During the last four weeks of pregnancy, my baby’s movement slowed and at 40 weeks, after my second reduced movement monitoring, the midwives wanted to induce me. “My birthing centre dreams were crushed and I was frightened. I had depression as a teen and anxiety in my early 20s, and in that moment the anxiety returned. “I knew I had to do what was best for my baby, so the next morning I was induced, and nearly 48 hours after the induction began my waters broke. I was exhausted and needed pain relief to get through it – initially I had gas and air, then an epidural. “Labour went on for another 23 hours and the midwives first tried to get Joshua out naturally, then with ventouse and finally forceps. But he became stuck and his heart rate dropped. Jaimie suffered terrible morning sickness throughout her pregnancy “I was rushed to theatre, where I panicked after hearing a crack as the team gave the forceps one more try. I thought they’d crushed my baby’s skull and was terrified one or both of us would die. “After an emergency C-section, the doctors said Joshua was fine and asked if I wanted to hold him, but I was too upset to even look at him. “I was annoyed with my baby for wrecking my body – something I felt guilty for. I asked the anaesthetist if it was normal to not want to hold your newborn after a traumatic birth and she reassured me that it was, but urged me to seek help if the feeling continued. Thankfully, it didn’t. “Once I was stitched, up Aaron placed Joshua on my chest and I felt a rush of love, but I was dazed and in incredible pain. Gorgeous Joshua poses for a photo “I felt violated, and in that photo every emotion – love, pain, fear, intrusion, worry – is etched on my face. “For weeks after, I didn’t care how I looked in front of a camera. I was in pure survival mode, concerned with whether I could walk or breastfeed. “For the first three months I had postnatal depression, which I believe was triggered by the difficult birth. Because of my mental health history, the hospital had allocated a perinatal psychiatric nurse, who I’d seen twice in pregnancy and then saw once a week for two months after Joshua’s birth. “Six hours after he was born, I posted a happy family pic on Insta and five days later I posted about mourning the loss of the plan of his arrival. Jaimie hopes that she can inspire pregnant women with her story “Three months later I shared the raw, honest first birth photo, opening up about how my labour had gone differently to what I’d planned, how that was OK and how it’s also OK if you’re suffering afterwards and need help. “I hope women who’ve had a traumatic birth will see my journey and realise it’s possible to recover and that one day, they will feel better, too.” ‘Applying make-up kept me calm before my C-section’ Holly Stevens, 35, is a beauty PR director and lives in London with her sports marketing partner Tom Fogg, 40. Their son Freddy was born on September 10, 2018. Holly Stevens and her partner Tom welcomes their son Freddy in September last year “My first photograph with Freddy represents the reality of my birth: completely flawless. I had a planned C-section and it felt totally calm and beautiful, largely helped by the surgeon who played relaxing classical music throughout. “Tom and I had only been together for three months when we conceived. The pregnancy came out of the blue and I was instantly terrified of giving birth. “I’d freaked out watching an Instagram birthing video and heard horror stories from my sister Louise, 38, who’d had pre-eclampsia and endured a terrible labour followed by an emergency Caesarean, for which she’d not been properly anaesthetised. “In the hope of a smooth birth, I booked privately for an elective C-section. It was costly, but as I’m self- employed, it was a huge advantage to know exactly when Freddy would arrive. Holly was terrified about giving birth but says her experience was flawless “I’m a real planner and because I felt so out of control during pregnancy, it helped me claw back some agency. “Looking my best during the birth was another thing I could control. After I fell pregnant, my best friend Alex, 34, said: ‘You can’t look s**t in your first baby picture.’ “Neither of us had been pregnant before, but we follow lots of celebrities on Instagram, including Abbey Clancy who looked stunning after giving birth. It really inspired me to do the same. “I knew that my first photograph with Freddy would go on Instagram and Facebook and be seen by friends, family and people I work with – clients, journalists and influencers – so I wanted to look as good as possible. The birth of Freddy was a planned C-section “Working in beauty PR, I’ve got a hairdresser client, so fortunately I rarely have to wash my own hair. I also keep my nails looking good with Shellac and get my eyebrows tattooed regularly. “People might think I’m being vain, but it’s crucial in my line of business that I’m always immaculately presented – and that includes in photographs of me with my newborn. “Two days before going to hospital I had my hair blow-dried in a salon and got my lashes extended and tinted so they’d look great in all the photos of me looking down at my new baby. “I’d had my eyebrows tattooed just before I got pregnant, so luckily they were still visible, too. Holly made sure she had her eyebrows and nails done before she gave birth “Just before I was due to have the C-section, I suddenly felt scared about the surgery so I distracted myself by applying make-up. Then I’d cry because of the nerves and would have to start over again! “As soon as I went into theatre, however, everything calmed down and I felt relaxed. I didn’t even realise they’d started operating until I felt a weird tug and Freddy was pulled out and held above the screen. “When my sister took the first photo of us together at 9.15am, I was on cloud nine, back in my hospital room drinking tea, munching on Hobnobs and feeling hopelessly in love with our baby son. “At the time, I’d taken lots of painkillers and was so excited that I don’t actually remember the photograph being taken! But I’m glad that it was, and that it’s there to remind us of the special moment. Holly works in PR and says its vital for her to always look immaculate “Unlike Stacey Solomon, I’d never dream of posting a photograph of myself covered in blood while cradling my newborn, because I wouldn’t want to remember the first moment with my baby as being all gungey. “It’s important for your own self-esteem to feel as good as you can. A few days after I was discharged with Freddy, I had a professional blow-dry at home to feel less like a sleep-deprived, ragged new mum. “It feels nice to look back at that first picture with Freddy knowing I felt my best at the very best time of my life.” ‘I was just so grateful my son was alive’ Natasha Bray, 32, is a rapid transformation therapy coach and psychology expert and lives in Bridgend. Her son Jenson, two, was born on October 5, 2016. Natasha’s son Jenson was born in October 2016 “When Jenson was placed on to my chest after a horrific 14-hour labour, I was in a daze. My body had tried to push the baby out before my cervix was fully dilated, and by the time I was ready the contractions had stopped so I delivered him without them. “I was severely torn internally and externally and was later diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse, a serious but common complication that comes from birth when one or more of the organs in the pelvis slip down from their normal position and bulge into the vagina. “At the time of this photograph, I had no idea of the severity of my injuries. I just remember thinking how beautiful my boy was and how lucky I was to finally have him after over a year of fearing I was infertile. “After being abused as a child, it was the first moment in my life when I had experienced unconditional love. Natasha says her birthing experience was traumatic “I’d become addicted to food when I was young, which was an emotional escape from the pain of childhood trauma. Then at 16, after ballooning to a size 16, I joined a gym but became addicted to working out. “Within three years, I had dropped to a size 6. I’d always dreamed of being married with children by 30, but when I came off the Pill in my late 20s I couldn’t get pregnant with my then boyfriend. “I thought I’d ruined my chances of being a mum because I’d treated my body so badly – it was a huge wake-up call. At 28 I transformed my diet. “I started taking natural supplements and eating more food and within 18 months, when I was a healthy size 10 and in a new relationship, I fell pregnant unexpectedly. Natasha’s labour lasted 14 hours and she severely damaged her body pushing her baby out “I’d not been with Marc, 33, long but I was over the moon, because I desperately wanted to be a mum. “The birth was traumatic. During labour I was in immeasurable pain but feared the worst for my unborn son, so when he arrived I was just grateful he was alive. “Because of the pelvic organ prolapse – a lifelong injury – I was told I could never exercise again. The news floored me, and although my relationship with fitness had become a lot healthier before pregnancy, I still used exercise as a distraction to blot out traumatic memories from my past. “Imagining a life without it was petrifying, and when Jenson was 10 months old I split up from his dad and was signed off work with stress and postnatal depression, which I believe was linked to the birth trauma and medical issues that followed. Natasha was told that she would not be able to exercise again “For a while I couldn’t look at Jenson’s birth photo without thinking about what I’d lost: my health, the family unit, myself. Now, it symbolises the start of my journey towards healing my past. “I’ve been told I can have surgery to repair the pelvic prolapse, but the op has a 30% failure rate and will stop me from having more kids, so it’s a decision I’m not ready to make at my age. “I’m having physiotherapy to strengthen my pelvic floor, but it’s a long journey ahead. “Without exercise I’ve been forced to deal with stress and emotional trauma in different ways, including launching my own business and having therapy sessions, which are a mix of CBT hypnosis and neuro-linguistic programming. She says having a baby has put everything into perspective “I’m also working with a postnatal personal trainer to build strength through light, low-impact exercise. “Having a baby has put everything into perspective and I’ve got one person to thank for teaching me so much: my little Jenson. He really is my saviour.” [bc_video video_id=”6048331816001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Joe Swash says Stacey Solomon was a warrior during labour but he nearly had to CATCH the baby during childbirth”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk