Scag

16 Apr 19
market outlook

Zero-Turn Mowers Market Report is a comprehensive, professional report provides a detailed overview of major drivers, restraints, challenges, opportunities, current market trends and strategies impacting the global market along with estimates and forecast of revenue and share analysis. About Zero-Turn Mowers The Commercial sector is expected to emerge as the largest end-use segment. One of the […]

15 Apr 19
HORRORPEDIA

Empire State of the Dead is a  2016 American horror anthology feature film directed by Matthew A. Peters, Chad Foster, Jamie Storrs, Joshua Reale, Geoff Orlowski, David Royal, Andrew Peters, Alex Bell, Stephen Long and Ron Bonk. It was produced by Bonk and Jonathan Straiton (director of Johnny Z; Night of Something Strange). Plot: The […]

10 Apr 19
Southwell Community Archaeology Group

A big thanks to Emily Gillott and Chris Brooke for their supervision and engagement and SCAG members who have been involved. Community archaeology at its very best! The last day of the excavation at 2 Vicars Court – part of the Heritage Lottery Funded project. Various cobbled and other surfaces have been investigated and removed. […]

08 Apr 19
America's Voice

By 2021, New York City will begin charging drivers who enter Manhattan below Central Park under the guise of congestion pricing. No one is surprised. City and state officials have been trying to make this happen for years. The rare alignment of views between the governor, the mayor, and the state legislature each likely motivated […]

05 Apr 19
Dangerous Endeavors

It occurs to me, that I’ve played more than a couple types of Fighter now, in 5e, and I could probably do a break down of my experiences thus far, and it might be worthwhile advise for someone who might just be starting down the path of D&D, so here it goes. Let me start […]

05 Apr 19
UTTERANCES DEVOID OF FRICTION

Me? I’m a trader in rag, bone and anything else I can scavenge off the streets around here. Got a cart but the nag had it. Chimp does it now him being the dog. Blog is about scrapes and more scrapes – scoundrels, dips and scallywags. Take it from me – rag/bone is the business […]

04 Apr 19
Pinky in the

Breakfast meeting for work You come out ,say goodbye for the capitol meeting. This may be the last time we will see each other,you emphasize. Laughed it off and smooched bye. While sailing, thoughts remind You getting thinner, Smaller but working out. Trying to avoid caffeine,boy that was unexpected. Shall i add avoid your scag […]

03 Apr 19
BGL & partners

Je zit er niet op te wachten, maar het kan gebeuren. Je bent aan de slag als trainer, coach of therapeut, maar je cliënt is niet tevreden en dient een klacht in. Hoe ga je hiermee om?

02 Apr 19
Daily News
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
Orange County Register
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
Pasadena Star News
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
Press Enterprise
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
SCNG
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
Whittier Daily News
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
Press Telegram
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).
02 Apr 19
Daily Breeze
Old-timer Southern California drivers will tell you of taking an afternoon rush-hour cruise from the Balboa Peninsula to Santa Monica involving the 405,  the 10 and PCH in 45 minutes. Or there’s the one about the school superintendent who lived in San Pedro and made the morning drive-time ride from his home to his office in Pasadena on the 110 through downtown in half an hour. Gen Xers and millennials laugh until the tears flow at such surely apocryphal tall tales. And yet they are true. The Westside and the Eastside were once not separate and unreachably faraway kingdoms. The OC and the Valley were as next-door neighbors. Folks living in the Inland Empire and the South Bay could say to friends, without joking: “Don’t be a stranger.” That’s because our region’s freeway system when built out in the 1950s, ‘60s and early ‘70s actually worked like a dream for getting around the vast area. And that’s because, with less than half of our current population, permanent gridlock was not a thing. But it is now. If you don’t hit the mid-day window of 1 p.m. to … let’s say 1:20, forgetaboutit. It’s all red brake lights for you. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Among the many proffered solutions from monorails to Elon Musk’s tunnels is “congestion pricing” — charging drivers money to enter crowded areas, especially Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s worked to reduce gridlock in central London and elsewhere. So would you pay $4 to drive west of the San Diego Freeway? That’s our Question of the Week for readers. A SCAG study predicts the charge during certain hours would reduce traffic delays and miles driven in the small area by more than 20 percent. Does that make it right? Would drivers on strict budgets be unfairly dinged for simply having to get to work or run errands? Are the prices we pay for vehicle maintenance, parking and fuel taxes already enough of a burden? Are surface-street toll roads simply unAmerican? Or is this a worthy experiment? With carpools given a break, would you drive with a buddy? Email your thoughts to opinion@scng.com. Please include your full name and city or community of residence. Provide a daytime phone number (it will not be published).